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Dove Brand Promise

Pearson

by Magda Adamska @ BrandStruck

Category: Education & art – educational resources, schools & universities; Media & entertainment – publishers Owner of the brand: Pearson PLC Key competitors: McGraw-Hill Education, Kaplan, Cengage Learning, Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

Artykuł Pearson pochodzi z serwisu BrandStruck.

Goldman Sachs

by Magda Adamska @ BrandStruck

Category: Financial services – banks, asset management Owner of the brand: The Goldman Sachs Group, Inc. Key competitors: Morgan Stanley, J.P. Morgan, Merrill Lynch, Citi

Artykuł Goldman Sachs pochodzi z serwisu BrandStruck.

Axe

by Magda Adamska @ BrandStruck

Category: FMCG Personal care & beauty – body care, deodorants, fragrances, hair care Owner of the brand: Unilever Key competitors: Nivea, L’Oréal, Gillette, Old Spice

Artykuł Axe pochodzi z serwisu BrandStruck.

Ballantine’s

by Magda Adamska @ BrandStruck

Category: FMCG Alcoholic beverages – whisky, whiskey & bourbon Owner of the brand: Pernod Ricard Key competitors: Johnnie Walker, Jack Daniel’s, Jim Beam, Jameson, Grant’s

Artykuł Ballantine’s pochodzi z serwisu BrandStruck.

Maltesers

by Magda Adamska @ BrandStruck

Category: FMCG Food – confectionery and chocolate, desserts & ice creams Owner of the brand: Mars, Inc. Key competitors: Reeses’s, Hershey’s, Smarties, Kit Kat, Cadbury

Artykuł Maltesers pochodzi z serwisu BrandStruck.

Ad Campaign of the Week: Mercedes-Benz Grow Up Campaign Appeals to Luxury Consumers

by Anne Pilon @ AYTM

When you think of the Mercedes-Benz brand, you probably associate it with affluent, established consumers who have found success in their professional and personal lives. But a new campaign from the automotive brand is forcing some to rethink that perception. … Continue reading

The post Ad Campaign of the Week: Mercedes-Benz Grow Up Campaign Appeals to Luxury Consumers appeared first on AYTM.

Too busy to write a Creative Brief? Then, at least write a Mini Creative Brief

by Graham Robertson @ Beloved Brands

With social media, digital advertising and search media, things are moving faster than ever. You still need a Creative Brief. However, you might need to try our Mini Creative Brief. Opportunities come to brand leaders Read more…

The post Too busy to write a Creative Brief? Then, at least write a Mini Creative Brief appeared first on Beloved Brands.

Pampers

by Magda Adamska @ BrandStruck

Category: FMCG Personal care & beauty – baby care Owner of the brand: Procter & Gamble Co. Key competitors: Huggies, Johnson’s

Artykuł Pampers pochodzi z serwisu BrandStruck.

H&M

by Magda Adamska @ BrandStruck

Category: Apparel – high street apparel; Retail – fashion stores, e-retail Owner of the brand: H & M Hennes & Mauritz AB Key competitors: Zara, Gap, Uniqlo, Benetton, Topshop, Forever 21

Artykuł H&M pochodzi z serwisu BrandStruck.

The 10 essential steps of the Creative Advertising process the Brand Leader must lead

by Graham Robertson @ Beloved Brands

When it comes to advertising, one of the biggest struggles that Brand Leaders have is when the project gets out of hand. While there are ten essential steps, the Brand Leader must keep their head Read more…

The post The 10 essential steps of the Creative Advertising process the Brand Leader must lead appeared first on Beloved Brands.

Zara

by Magda Adamska @ BrandStruck

Category: Apparel – high street apparel; Retail – fashion stores, e-retail Owner of the brand: Inditex Key competitors: H&M, Gap, Uniqlo, Topshop, Forever 21, Benetton

Artykuł Zara pochodzi z serwisu BrandStruck.

Barclays

by Magda Adamska @ BrandStruck

Category: Financial services – banks, asset management Owner of the brand: Barclays Bank PLC Key competitors: HSBC, Citi, Santander, J.P. Morgan, Goldman Sachs, Morgan Stanley

Artykuł Barclays pochodzi z serwisu BrandStruck.

Be Real Body Image Pledge

Be Real Body Image Pledge


Dove UK

Dove is proudly supporting the launch of the Be Real Body Image Pledge

Axe wants to give men their own Dove moment in first global brand campaign

Axe wants to give men their own Dove moment in first global brand campaign


The Drum

Unilever-owned Axe, known as Lynx in the UK, has made a U-turn on its marketing strategy and is looking to emulate the success sister-brand of Dove's Real Beauty Sketches push with its first global brand campaign that promises to inject a bit of honesty into the male grooming category.

Luxury & sales force: learn to manage brand ambassadors

by aufeminin @ Womenology

Of the top fifteen international luxury brands, seven are French. French brands represent 25% of the world market in luxury personal assets (fashion, accessories, perfume, watches and jewellery), or 212 billion euros (Cabinet Bain & Company – 2012). (1) In …

Continuer la lecture

The post Luxury & sales force: learn to manage brand ambassadors appeared first on Womenology.

brand love

by tomfishburne @ Marketoonist | Tom Fishburne

Marketing is full of myths, anecdotes, and long-held beliefs of what drives growth. I think part of our job as marketers is to continually question these assumptions. It’s easy for marketers to get entranced by the idea that consumers will fall in love with our brands. Former Saatchi & Saatchi CEO Kevin Roberts coined the term “Lovemark” in 2005 and…

Twitter

by Magda Adamska @ BrandStruck

Category: Media & entertainment – social media Owner of the brand: Twitter, Inc. Key competitors: Facebook, Snapchat, Instagram, LinkedIn

Artykuł Twitter pochodzi z serwisu BrandStruck.

Red Bull

by Magda Adamska @ BrandStruck

Category: FMCG Non-alcoholic beverages – sports & energy drinks; Media & entertainment – digital media Owner of the brand: Red Bull GmbH Key competitors: Monster, Rockstar, Lucozade, NOS, Burn, Mountain Dew

Artykuł Red Bull pochodzi z serwisu BrandStruck.

Danone

by Magda Adamska @ BrandStruck

Category: FMCG Food – dairy; FMCG Non-alcoholic beverages – water Owner of the brand: Danone Key competitors: Nestlé, Yoplait, Chobani, Aquafina, Dasani

Artykuł Danone pochodzi z serwisu BrandStruck.

Fanta

by Magda Adamska @ BrandStruck

Category: FMCG Non-alcoholic beverages – soft drinks Owner of the brand: Coca-Cola Company Key competitors: Tango, Mirinda, Sunkist, Orangina

Artykuł Fanta pochodzi z serwisu BrandStruck.

Johnson’s

by Magda Adamska @ BrandStruck

Category: FMCG Personal care & beauty – baby care Owner of the brand: Johnson & Johnson Key competitors: Pampers, Huggies

Artykuł Johnson’s pochodzi z serwisu BrandStruck.

Ad Campaign of the Week: Halo Top Cinematic Ad Appeals to Moviegoers

by Anne Pilon @ AYTM

Popular ice cream brand Halo Top just unveiled a strange new ad that’s meant to run before scary movies in theaters throughout the next few months. Since it’s a popular time for scary movies, it could be a decent strategy … Continue reading

The post Ad Campaign of the Week: Halo Top Cinematic Ad Appeals to Moviegoers appeared first on AYTM.

Dove: the perfect success story in advertising

by aufeminin @ Womenology

In 2004 Dove launched a ground breaking worldwide advertising campaign in the beauty industry. The brand created a new way to address their public which aimed to be “real” by getting rid of the complexes that beauty product consumers suffer from. …

Continuer la lecture

The post Dove: the perfect success story in advertising appeared first on Womenology.

Dove

Dove


Unilever global company website

Dove is committed to helping women realise their personal potential for beauty by engaging them with products that deliver real care.

Dom Pérignon

by Magda Adamska @ BrandStruck

Category: FMCG Alcoholic beverages – champagne & wine Owner of the brand: LVMH Moët Hennessy Louis Vuitton SE Key competitors: Nicolas Feuillatte, G.H. Mumm, Laurent-Perrier, Taittinger, Pommery, Piper-Heidsieck, Cristal

Artykuł Dom Pérignon pochodzi z serwisu BrandStruck.

John Lewis puts focus on social media with 360 ad trial and new hire

by Thomas Hobbs @ Marketing Week

The retailer is hiring for a new head of brand and social marketing role as it looks to differentiate its retail experience and invest in the brand.

The post John Lewis puts focus on social media with 360 ad trial and new hire appeared first on Marketing Week.

Five Insights About Gender And Brands

by Chris Wren @ Branding Strategy Insider

Gender is a loaded topic. Increasingly, the traditional notions of gender are being challenged by progressive attitudes that gender is fluid. The implications could represent a fundamental change in the way marketers view audiences, since a cornerstone of demographic profiling usually includes whether a customer is a man or a woman. A new report from […]

Lloyds

by Magda Adamska @ BrandStruck

Category: Financial services – banks, asset management Owner of the brand: Lloyds Banking Group plc Key competitors: HSBC, Barclays, Royal Bank of Scotland, Santander

Artykuł Lloyds pochodzi z serwisu BrandStruck.

Brands Grow With Empathy | Branding Strategy Insider

Brands Grow With Empathy | Branding Strategy Insider


Branding Strategy Insider

Empathy wields power for brand builders.

New Axe ad campaign trying to be the "Dove" brand for young men

New Axe ad campaign trying to be the "Dove" brand for young men


Beloved Brands

The Axe consumer has grown up and now Axe wants to grow up with that consumer. When my son was 13, he started using the Axe brand. One day, I was walking p

Should your brand launch a youth sub-brand?

by Leonie Roderick @ Marketing Week

More companies are launching sub-brands to appeal to a younger demographic, but they would be wise to take a look at the parent brand instead.

The post Should your brand launch a youth sub-brand? appeared first on Marketing Week.

Preparing for the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR)

by Shane Kosch @ Prophet Thinking

General Data Protection Regulation intends to strengthen data protection and becomes enforceable across Europe on May 25, 2018. Here’s what brands need to know.

The post Preparing for the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) appeared first on Prophet Thinking.

Facebook responds to growing ‘uneasiness’ over brand safety with new ad controls

by Sarah Vizard @ Marketing Week

The social network is introducing new eligibility standards for publishers and creators that will lay out more clearly the type of content that can be monetised.

The post Facebook responds to growing ‘uneasiness’ over brand safety with new ad controls appeared first on Marketing Week.

Next: We won’t retaliate against Amazon, we will learn from them

by Thomas Hobbs @ Marketing Week

Despite Amazon’s own-label fashion brand Find going after its core customers, Next chief executive Lord Wolfson says he won’t slip into 'terrible analogies of war'.

The post Next: We won’t retaliate against Amazon, we will learn from them appeared first on Marketing Week.

Commentaires sur Gender Marketing Encounters: Marti Barletta par Colleen Faheu

by Colleen Faheu @ Commentaires pour Womenology

Hi, Marti, I always learn something from your work. This time it's not about women but about Canada! I've experience that underscores your view that "...Canada is a more forward-thinking market than the US. Big companies like Unilever, P&G, or Ford often view the Canadian market as a good place to try new thinking." As I'm doing missionary work to establish the discipline of Audio Branding in North America, I knock on a lot of doors. Canadian marketers, however, find me and reach out to me." Hah! I think I'll make more trips to Toronto. Cheers, Colleen

Can a grandmother working with Harvard save girls like Promise from domestic violence?

by Allison Heller @ Saving Promise

We Need People To Make Brands Work

by Derrick Daye @ Branding Strategy Insider

In 2000, the Wired article The Future Does Not Need Us called into question whether machines were quite the panacea we hoped they were. It was possible, said Bill Joy, that this dependence on machines was not going to a good place. If we can conclude as marketers that machines are building barriers and taking […]

How to Create Effective Buyer Personas

How to Create Effective Buyer Personas

by larissa pickens @ Journal - Creative Digital & Design Agency for Beauty and LIfestyle Brands

Can you describe your ideal customer in a nutshell? If not, it’s time to create some buyer personas. Buyer personas, also known as marketing personas, are models that help you tailor your branding and marketing to the people who need your product or service.

If you’ve never made buyer personas before, gathering and compiling the necessary information can seem intimidating. Luckily, the process is actually fairly straightforward. This article will walk you through the process of creating buyer personas, whether you’re doing it for the first time or just need a quick refresher.

 

What kind of information should a buyer persona include?

A useful buyer persona is multi-dimensional. It should include demographic information as well as more personal details, like what kind of challenges your ideal customer faces and what their goals for the future are. Some good information to include in your buyer personas includes: \

  • Basic demographic information. How old is your ideal customer? Are they male or female? Where do they live? Do they have a spouse or family?
  • Information about education and job status. Does your ideal customer have a high school diploma, or are they currently in college? How much do they earn? Are they happy with their job?
  • Information about what a typical day is like for your ideal customer. Do they work long hours? What are their habits like? What do they enjoy doing in their spare time?
  • Information about your ideal customer’s problems and goals. What do they want to achieve most? What’s holding them back?

 

The type of information that’s most useful to you will depend on what kind of business you have. For instance, if you’re running a tech startup, you might be particularly interested in your customers’ internet habits. Decide which of the categories above are most relevant to your situation, and focus on gathering that information.

You’ll probably want to create more than one buyer persona, since most businesses serve more than just a single demographic. Three to five personas is usually enough to capture the most important facets of your target market.

 

How to gather information

Once you know what kind of information you’re after, you can start collecting it from your current customers and leads. There are a number of ways you can approach this task.

1. Use data from your website. Google Analytics can give you a breakdown of your visitors’ age, gender, and location, along with information about which search terms people are using to find you. If you have contact forms on your website, you can get extra information from them by including fields for things like the person’s job title or the main thing they’re looking for.

2. Leverage social media. Use channels like Facebook, Twitter, and Pinterest to interact with customers. When people like your content or leave comments, make note of who they are, where they’re from, and any other relevant info in their profile.

3. Get your whole team involved. Talk to customer service, sales, and other employees who interact with customers on a regular basis. Ask them for their insights on who your customers are, what they want, and what influences them to buy (or not to buy) your product or service.

4. Conduct surveys. Use online tools like Survey Monkey to ask your visitors and customers questions about themselves. You’ll get information about your customer base straight from the source, and your customers will appreciate feeling heard. Providing some kind of incentive, like a discount, may help you get more replies.

5. Conduct interviews. Reach out to customers and leads and ask them if they’d be willing to be interviewed. Focus on gleaning information from them that would be hard to collect from analytics alone, such as what they need most right now, what stresses them out, and where they hope to be in five years.

 

Putting it All Together

As you gather data about your customers, you’ll probably start noticing some patterns. Use those patterns to start putting your buyer personas together. Sift through the information you’ve collected and flesh each persona out with realistic personal details.

Go the extra mile to make your personas seem like actual people. Give each of them a name, like “Manager Michael,” and find a stock image that reflects the gender, age, and occupation of the persona. Imagining your personas as people you might really interact with will help you market to the customers they represent most effectively.

How university partnerships are helping brands attract the best talent

by Charlotte Rogers @ Marketing Week

Businesses partnering with universities to offer value-added opportunities for students are reaping the rewards when it comes to futureproofing the quality of their workforce.

The post How university partnerships are helping brands attract the best talent appeared first on Marketing Week.

The skills, behaviors and experiences needed to be a great Marketer

by Graham Robertson @ Beloved Brands

As you manage your own Marketing Career, you assess your skills, behaviors and experiences, to figure where your gaps that you should address. A marketer must build their capability around key skill areas strategy, analytics, Read more…

The post The skills, behaviors and experiences needed to be a great Marketer appeared first on Beloved Brands.

Disney shifts focus to put digital content at the heart of its brand partnerships

by Leonie Roderick @ Marketing Week

Disney is launching its own digital ad network as it looks to “monetise content that hasn’t been monetised in the past”.

The post Disney shifts focus to put digital content at the heart of its brand partnerships appeared first on Marketing Week.

Heinz

by Magda Adamska @ BrandStruck

Category: FMCG Food – Soups, sauces & seasonings, baby food Owner of the brand: The Kraft Heinz Company Key competitors: Hunt’s, Campbell’s, Hellmann’s, Knorr

Artykuł Heinz pochodzi z serwisu BrandStruck.

Tesla

by Magda Adamska @ BrandStruck

Category: Automotive – cars, luxury cars; Energy – energy storage systems Owner of the brand: Tesla Motors Key competitors: Mercedes-Benz, BMW, Audi, Shell, ExxonMobil, BP

Artykuł Tesla pochodzi z serwisu BrandStruck.

Have a Service Business? What You Need to Prepare For Your Website

Have a Service Business? What You Need to Prepare For Your Website

by larissa pickens @ Journal - Creative Digital & Design Agency for Beauty and LIfestyle Brands

Creating a website for your service business is a big job, but it doesn’t have to be overwhelming. If you plan the pages you want, draft your copy, and gather important information ahead of time, your site will come together more quickly and easily – and you’ll probably enjoy the process of creating it more, too. We've helped a range of service-based businesses — from dentists to video editors and from interior designers to investors — level-up their web presence. This article will show you how to prepare materials for your service business website or portfolio.  

 

1. Home page

Your home page is always a good place to dive in — it's the most commonly viewed site so make sure to orienting visitors quickly. Use this space to give visitors an overview of what you do and how you can help them. Keep your copy brief and benefits-focused, giving them a high level overview of what's available on the site. You can save the details for other sections of your site, like your services page.

Pay particular attention to your headline. A great headline is focused, specific, and highlights your Unique Value Proposition (UVP) – the quality that makes your business uniquely helpful or important. As the first thing your visitors see, your home page headline is one of the most important elements of your site, so take the time to get it right.

 

2. About page

It might seem like a page you can ignore, but about pages are typically one of the most commonly clicked pages. Your about page should give visitors more information about who you are. Some good points to touch on include your education and past experience, as well as the history of your business. Don’t be afraid to let your personality shine through! A friendly, personable tone is usually better than a stiff, formal one.

About pages are notoriously difficult to write. If you’re feeling tongue-tied, try shifting your focus onto the client. Think about what your clients need, and highlight the ways your experience and qualifications help you meet those needs.

 

3. Services

Your services page is the place to go into detail about what you do and answer questions that visitors might have. Make a list of all the different services you offer, the types of clients you usually work with, and the situations when people most often hire you. Then give some thought to how you want to present this information. Lists with bullet points and headings are a good option, since they’re easy to scan. Charts are another good choice, since they make it easy to compare various services.

You can list your prices or create packages on your services page, but you don’t have to. Do what makes the most sense for your business.

 

4. Portfolio or case studies

The best way to show potential customers what you can do for them is to show them what you’ve already done for others. If you’re planning to create a portfolio page, start gathering links, images, or PDFs that reflect some of the best work you’ve done in the past. If you’re writing case studies, make sure your potential clients will find them relatable and easy to follow. Get specific about the problems your past clients had, how you approached them, and how your clients’ results improved with your help.

As you take on more projects and gain experience, your portfolio will change. Create an easy-to-duplicate template for your example work now, so that updating your page will be quick and simple in the future.

 

5. Testimonials and Trust

To win visitors’ trust, don’t sell your own services too hard – let your past clients do it for you. Get into the habit of collecting testimonials from happy clients after you finish a project with them. To keep it simple (and ensure you get useful feedback), you might want to create a form or template for this. In addition, keep track of any other authority-building details you want to use later, such as press mentions or famous clients you worked with.

Before you create your website, decide which testimonials you want to feature. Choose the ones that emphasize the benefits your clients got from working with you – these will be most convincing to potential new clients. Think about whether you want to make a dedicated page for testimonials, or just place them on your home page or services page.

 

6. Contact Page

The copy on your contact page should encourage an interested visitor to go ahead and get in touch with you. You may want to include something like a list of your qualifications or a summary of the benefits a client can expect when they work with you. If you’re using a contact form, think about which fields you want to include.

 

7. Additional Contact Options

Make it as easy as possible for people to reach out to you by including a variety of contact options on your website. Providing your phone number and email address will increase visitors’ trust in you, even if most people still opt to use your contact form. In fact, you may want to include your phone and email contact information in your site’s header or footer, so visitors can find it on every page.

Consider which, if any, online communication tools you want to use on your site. If you frequently chat with potential clients via phone or Skype, you can automate the process by embedding an appointment scheduling system like Calendly or Acuity on your contact page. You can also use live chat software, like Intercom or Drift, to talk with visitors and answer their questions in real time.

 

8. Your Blog

Blogging can be great for your business, but it also requires a long-term investment of time, money, or both. Think carefully about whether blogging is right for you before you create your website. It’s often better to avoid blogging altogether than to start a blog and then abandon it.

If you do decide to blog, make sure your plan is sustainable. Think about whether you want to write your own posts or hire a writer, and map out a publishing schedule that’s reasonable for you. You may even want to line up several posts ahead of time, so you’re not scrambling to fill an empty blog when your site goes live.

 

9. Social Media

If you’re already marketing your business on social media, it may be a good idea to integrate those platforms into your website. You could make your blog posts shareable with social media buttons, for instance, or include your Twitter feed in a sidebar. Take into account which platforms your target audience prefers, so you’ll be able to connect with them most easily.

 

10. Mailing List

A mailing list is one of the most powerful marketing tools you can have in your arsenal. If you’re planning on creating one, don’t wait – plan your strategy now, so you can start collecting email addresses as soon as your site is up and running.

There are several steps to building a mailing list. First, decide which email marketing provider you want to use. Constant Contact and Mail Chimp are two popular options. Next, think about where you want to place your opt-in forms on your website. You can embed them in a sidebar or the body of a page, or you can use a tool like OptinMonster to capture leads before they leave your site.

Finally, think about what incentive you’ll provide to get people to sign up for your mailing list. Tried-and-true options include a discount, online course, ebook, or white paper. Create your incentive now, so it will be ready to use when your site launches.

 

11. Maintenance

Creating your website is only half the battle – the other half is maintaining it. Give some thought to how you’ll keep your web presence up-to-date as time goes by. If boosting your search engine visibility is part of your long-term plan, create a schedule for publishing new content marketing materials like blog posts.

 

Even if you’re planning to use mostly evergreen materials on your site, it’s still important to do regular maintenance checks. Once or twice a year, review your site and make sure it represents your business accurately. Upload new photos, tweak your layout and design to keep it looking fresh, and update your copy to reflect any changes that have occurred in your field.


Dove

Dove


Unilever USA

Discover the dove® difference

Mountain Dew

by Magda Adamska @ BrandStruck

Category: FMCG Non-alcoholic beverages – soft drinks Owner of the brand: PepsiCo Key competitors: Sprite, Red Bull

Artykuł Mountain Dew pochodzi z serwisu BrandStruck.

Victoria’s Secret

by Magda Adamska @ BrandStruck

Category: Apparel – high street apparel; Retail – fashion stores, e-retail; FMCG Personal care & beauty – body care, fragrances Owner of the brand: L Brands Inc. Key competitors: Aerie, Agent Provocateur, Triumph International, Intimissimi

Artykuł Victoria’s Secret pochodzi z serwisu BrandStruck.

Tide

by Magda Adamska @ BrandStruck

Category: FMCG Household products – laundry products Owner of the brand: Procter & Gamble Co. Key competitors: Purex, Arm & Hammer, Persil, All

Artykuł Tide pochodzi z serwisu BrandStruck.

TUMI Luggage – TLX Collection

by Jack Lenton @ Ape to Gentleman

Premium travel and luggage brand TUMI has announced the launch of its first ever European made TLX collection.

The post TUMI Luggage – TLX Collection appeared first on Ape to Gentleman.

DOVE PROMISES Valentine Milk Chocolate Candy Hearts, 8.87 Oz - Walmart.com

DOVE PROMISES Valentine Milk Chocolate Candy Hearts, 8.87 Oz - Walmart.com


Walmart.com

Buy DOVE PROMISES Valentine Milk Chocolate Candy Hearts, 8.87 Oz at Walmart.com

YouTube

by Magda Adamska @ BrandStruck

Category: Media & entertainment – digital media, social media, streaming services Owner of the brand: Alphabet, Inc. Key competitors: Daily Motion, Vimeo, Spotify, Apple, Amazon, Facebook, Instagram, Snapchat

Artykuł YouTube pochodzi z serwisu BrandStruck.

Nescafé

by Magda Adamska @ BrandStruck

Category: FMCG Non-alcoholic beverages – coffee Owner of the brand: Nestlé S.A. Key competitors: Jacobs, Tchibo, Maxwell House, Folgers, Douwe Egberts, Starbucks

Artykuł Nescafé pochodzi z serwisu BrandStruck.

Dove

Dove


Unilever Middle East

In a world of hype and stereotypes, Dove empowers women's esteem recognising that beauty comes in all shapes and sizes and it's simply about how you feel.

Smarter video advertising – McDonalds case study

by Chris Fowles @ MWP Digital Media

McDonalds released a new television commercial earlier recently, and much to everyone’s surprise, it doesn’t mention the name of the fast food chain once. This is just the latest example of brands taking a drastically smarter and more subtle approach to advertising. In this blog we’ll explore some of the reasons for the new trend, and why […]

The post Smarter video advertising – McDonalds case study appeared first on MWP Digital Media.

Levi’s

by Magda Adamska @ BrandStruck

Category: Apparel – high street apparel; Retail – fashion stores, e-retail Owner of the brand: Levi Strauss & Co. Key competitors: Diesel, Wrangler, Pepe Jeans, Lee

Artykuł Levi’s pochodzi z serwisu BrandStruck.

Porsche

by Magda Adamska @ BrandStruck

Category: Automotive – cars, luxury cars, car accessories Owner of the brand: Volkswagen Group Key competitors: Ferrari, Lamborghini, Corvette, Jaguar

Artykuł Porsche pochodzi z serwisu BrandStruck.

Public Health England wants to make its brand ‘part of the fabric of society’

by Leonie Roderick @ Marketing Week

The government health body is changing its strategy as it looks to take its “tools out of the marketing world and into everyday interactions with the health system”.

The post Public Health England wants to make its brand ‘part of the fabric of society’ appeared first on Marketing Week.

Emirates Airline

by Magda Adamska @ BrandStruck

Category: Travel & transportation – airlines Owner of the brand: The Emirates Group (owned by the government of Dubai) Key competitors: Etihad Airways, Qatar Airways, Delta Air Lines, United Airlines, American Airlines, British Airways

Artykuł Emirates Airline pochodzi z serwisu BrandStruck.

How to Define A Target Market in 5 Steps

How to Define A Target Market in 5 Steps

by larissa pickens @ Journal - Creative Digital & Design Agency for Beauty and LIfestyle Brands

Who is your target market for your business' product or service? If you're trying to sell to everybody, you might want to rethink your marketing strategy. While it might seem like marketing to a wide audience will get you more sales, this is rarely the case. Narrowing down your target audience — and then marketing in a way that's relevant to them — is a much better strategy to growing your business. Here are five questions you can ask yourself to narrow down your target market.

 

1. What kind of solution am I offering? 

People buy things to solve their problems. The nature of these problems can vary widely. Not all problems are practical - for instance, some people buy expensive cars to solve their perceived problem of not looking cool enough. Every business offers a solution to some kind of problem, practical or not. 

 

Think about how you make customers' lives easier or provide them what they want. Why do people seek out your product or service? How are their lives better after hiring you or purchasing from you? In short, what kind of value do you provide?

 

2. Who needs the solutions I offer?

Of course, not everybody has the same problems. While there are a few problems, like keeping in touch with loved ones or getting from place to place, that almost everyone deals with, chances are that your product or service deals with a more niche type of problem. 

Ask yourself who could benefit from the solutions you offer. Get as specific as you can. Are business people most likely to need your services? Teenagers? Busy parents? Once you have a general idea of who makes up your target audience, you can start narrowing your focus even more.

 

3. What are the demographics of my target audience?

Age, gender, and socioeconomic status are all important things to know about your target audience. The better you can pin down your market's demographic factors, the more effectively you'll be able to advertise to them. Is the average person who needs your services a man or a woman? How old are they? What's their family life like? People from different demographic groups respond differently to advertisements, so it's important to answer this question accurately.

 

4. What does my target audience need and want?

Don't stop at figuring out your target market's basic demographic information. Visualize your ideal customer and get into their head even more. Go beyond the basics. What do they want most in life? What are they afraid of? What do they want to achieve in the next ten years? If you can tap into your target audience's emotions and thoughts, you'll have all the information you need to build a branding and marketing strategy that gets you results. 

 

5. What is my unique selling proposition?

To successfully convert leads into customers, it isn't enough just to solve a problem. You've also got to solve it differently or better than your competitors do. Take a look at businesses similar to yours, and figure out what makes you stand out from them. This is your unique selling proposition, or USP. After you've nailed down your USP, you can use it to further narrow down the pool of potential leads and hone your marketing strategy even more. 

 

 If you want to advertise more efficiently, create products that sell better, and turn leads into conversions, take a few minutes to think about who you're trying to convert. Defining your target market is an essential step as a business owner. Once you put in the effort, you'll find yourself with a better brand and more happy customers.


Morgan Stanley

by Magda Adamska @ BrandStruck

Category: Financial services – banks, asset management Owner of the brand: Morgan Stanley Key competitors: Goldman Sachs, Merrill Lynch, J.P. Morgan, Citi

Artykuł Morgan Stanley pochodzi z serwisu BrandStruck.

Mattel

by Magda Adamska @ BrandStruck

Category: Kids products – toys, publishing & media Owner of the brand: Mattel, Inc. Key competitors: Lego, Hasbro

Artykuł Mattel pochodzi z serwisu BrandStruck.

Pinterest

by Magda Adamska @ BrandStruck

Category: Media & entertainment – social media; Retail – e-retail Owner of the brand: Pinterest, Inc. Key competitors: Instagram, Facebook, Google, eBay, WeHeartIt, Fancy, Piccsy

Artykuł Pinterest pochodzi z serwisu BrandStruck.

American Airlines

by Magda Adamska @ BrandStruck

Category: Travel & transportation – airlines Owner of the brand: American Airlines Group, Inc. Key competitors: Delta Air Lines, United Airlines, Emirates Airline, British Airways

Artykuł American Airlines pochodzi z serwisu BrandStruck.

Converse

by Magda Adamska @ BrandStruck

Category: Apparel – sportswear Owner of the brand: Nike, Inc. Key competitors: Vans, Adidas, Reebok, Under Armour, Puma

Artykuł Converse pochodzi z serwisu BrandStruck.

Nestlé

by Magda Adamska @ BrandStruck

Category: FMCG Food – baby food, cereals, dairy, confectionery and chocolate, desserts & ice creams; FMCG Non-alcoholic beverages – soft drinks, coffee, water Owner of the brand: Nestlé S.A. Key competitors: Kellogg’s, Danone, Cadbury, Hershey’s, Snickers, Milka, Jacobs, Tchibo, Lipton, Aquafina, Dasani, Evian

Artykuł Nestlé pochodzi z serwisu BrandStruck.

Moët & Chandon

by Magda Adamska @ BrandStruck

Category: FMCG Alcoholic beverages – champagne & wine Owner of the brand: LVMH Moët Hennessy Louis Vuitton SE Key competitors: Nicolas Feuillatte, G.H. Mumm, Laurent-Perrier, Taittinger, Pommery, Piper-Heidsieck, Cristal

Artykuł Moët & Chandon pochodzi z serwisu BrandStruck.

American Express

by Magda Adamska @ BrandStruck

Category: Financial services – payment solutions Owner of the brand: American Express Company Key competitors: Visa, Mastercard, Discover, PayPal

Artykuł American Express pochodzi z serwisu BrandStruck.

Dove

Dove


Unilever South Africa

Dove provides a refreshingly real alternative for women who recognise that beauty comes in all shapes and sizes.

Archetype Innocent: free to be you and me | The Big Story

Archetype Innocent: free to be you and me | The Big Story


The Big Story

Marketing a Innocent brand is understanding that people still have the yearning for honesty and beauty in this world. It's all about keeping hope alive.

International round-up: Coca-Cola’s new corporate campaign, Uber sues mobile agency

by Marketing Week Reporters @ Marketing Week

Coca-Cola looks to make its corporate brand about more than just Coke Coca-Cola has launched a new corporate branding campaign in the US that aims to portray it as a “total beverage company” and shift the focus away from its most famous product. The spots, which are airing on US TV, feature a wide range […]

The post International round-up: Coca-Cola’s new corporate campaign, Uber sues mobile agency appeared first on Marketing Week.

Puma

by Magda Adamska @ BrandStruck

Category: Apparel – sportswear Owner of the brand: Kering Key competitors: Nike, Adidas, Reebok, Under Armour

Artykuł Puma pochodzi z serwisu BrandStruck.

Netflix

by Magda Adamska @ BrandStruck

Category: Media & entertainment – streaming services Owner of the brand: Netflix, Inc. Key competitors: Hulu, Amazon Prime, HBO

Artykuł Netflix pochodzi z serwisu BrandStruck.

The Real Value In Brand Vision, Mission And Values

by Mark Di Somma @ Branding Strategy Insider

A truth about strategy: it wasn’t what it is that counts, it’s what you do with it. So many companies fill out the paperwork without committing themselves to the implications, basically because they don’t want to be locked into anything that’s too “definite” in a world that they perceive as continuously changing. The problem with […]

Dr Pepper

by Magda Adamska @ BrandStruck

Category: FMCG Non-alcoholic beverages – soft drinks Owner of the brand: Dr Pepper Snapple Group (North America), Coca-Cola Company (selected countries) Key competitors: Coca-Cola (North America), Pepsi

Artykuł Dr Pepper pochodzi z serwisu BrandStruck.

The keys to online shopping for women

by aufeminin @ Womenology

« Purchasing, especially online, allows people to feel part of a large community with values at the heart of it, brand values.” These are the words of sociologist Stéphane Hugon whose doctoral research focused on “The social construction of online identity”. …

Continuer la lecture

The post The keys to online shopping for women appeared first on Womenology.

Channel 4

by Magda Adamska @ BrandStruck

Category: Media & entertainment – TV channels, streaming services Owner of the brand: Channel Four Television Corporation (a public corporation of the UK government) Key competitors: BBC, ITV, Sky, Netflix

Artykuł Channel 4 pochodzi z serwisu BrandStruck.

Mission Statements:  Why You Need One and How to Write It

Mission Statements: Why You Need One and How to Write It

by larissa pickens @ Journal - Creative Digital & Design Agency for Beauty and LIfestyle Brands

Your mission statement defines your business goals in three key ways: what the company does for its customers, what it does for its employees, and what it does for its owners. A mission statement describes a business's current reason for being. It is sometimes referred to as  company mission, corporate mission, or corporate purpose.

A mission statement describes where you are right now and how you plan to accomplish your current goals whereasthe vision statement focuses on the future and where you want to go in the future. Meanwhile a unique value proposition tends to focus more on positioning your company with competitors. 

 

Why You Need a Mission Statement

A well-formed mission statement can support your brand in many ways. Use your mission statement to:

  • Accurately pinpoint your business strategy and identity — Your mission statement forces you to narrow in on what you’re trying to accomplish in your business. It helps you to succinctly sum up your strategy and identity, giving a focus to your brand.
  • Quickly communicate business goals and values — Your mission statement can give the basics of your business philosophy to people who are curious about your company.
  • Guide decision making — Your mission statement helps you maintain consistency in marketing and product development. Your brand can be shaped by the decisions made throughout your company, both in the present and in the future, with the guidance of a carefully formed mission statement.
  • Unify the entire company under one banner — Your mission statement is helpful for your entire staff. It can provide a clear concept of the direction which you want your company to take, and it can help to ensure that all your employees are on the same page  as your company grows and develops.

A good mission statement gives prospective customers a reason to do business with you, and gives your own employees something to rally behind.

 

What Goes in a Mission Statement

Like a brand itself, a mission statement’s contents can be flexible. Sometimes it’s a single sentence, sometimes it’s a paragraph, sometimes it’s an entire page. As a best practice, try to limit yours to a paragraph or two, but don’t feel restricted if you want to add more.

Your mission statement should answer a few key questions about your brand:

  • Customers:
    What problem do you solve for your customers?
    What do you do and why do you do it?
    What market do you serve and what benefits do you offer?
  • Owners:
    Do you want to make a profit, or is it enough to just make a living?
    What are your financial or personal goals for the business?
  • Employees:
    What working situation do you create for your employees?
    What are your values as an employer?
     

While these are the main points of a mission statement, you may want to expand to discuss special processes, ambitions or the company philosophy. Remember that a mission statement should showcase the unique personality of your brand so avoid over generalizations.

 

How to Write a Mission Statement

Even though it’s short, writing a mission statement isn’t always easy. If you find it difficult to get started, follow our five-step process below. Before you begin, you may find it helpful to complete the preparation exercises at the end of this article to help get your creative juices flowing.

  1. Define your business goals, strategy, and ethics.
    You can’t write a mission statement if you don’t know what your mission is. Collect your thoughts and write out a brief description of your brand’s business model and ethics. Also describe the personality you’d like your brand to have. Answering the four questions above is a good start.
  2. Create a list of keywords.
    What words best represent your brand? Traditional or Innovative? Affordable or High-end? These are the words you will sprinkle throughout your mission statement: a single powerful word can make more impact than a sentence-long description.
  3. Flex your writing muscles and look for the most potent words. 
    For example, careful does not hold as much weight as meticulous. Break out the thesaurus if you’re struggling.
  4. Frame everything as a story using the keywords. Take time to write a first draft. Try to present your information as a narrative: who you are, what you do, what makes you special. Aim for a paragraph, but don’t be afraid to go longer. You can always cut it down later. If you just keep writing, you may find that usable ideas flow more easily.
  5. Summarize with a powerful leading statement.
    Once you have the bulk of your mission statement written, you’ll want to summarize your brand’s mission into a single sentence (or a series of punchy words). This can be catchy or inspirational.
  6. Refine meticulously.
    Mission statements should be short and sweet. Keep cutting, editing, combining, and rewriting until you have something that’s both engaging and quick to read. 

Dove

Dove


Unilever Canada

Dove grew from a moisturising Beauty Bar into a global brand with a range of products: body washes, hand and body lotions, facial cleansers, deodorants, shampoos, conditioners and hair styling.

7up

by Magda Adamska @ BrandStruck

Category: FMCG Non-alcoholic beverages – soft drinks Owner of the brand: Dr Pepper Snapple Group (US), PepsiCo (rest of the world) Key competitors: Sprite

Artykuł 7up pochodzi z serwisu BrandStruck.

Santander

by Magda Adamska @ BrandStruck

Category: Financial services – banks, asset management Owner of the brand: Santander Group Key competitors: HSBC, Citi, Wells Fargo, Barclays

Artykuł Santander pochodzi z serwisu BrandStruck.

Instagram

by Magda Adamska @ BrandStruck

Category: Media & entertainment – social media Owner of the brand: Facebook, Inc. Key competitors: Snapchat, Pinterest, Twitter, Hipstamatic, Prisma

Artykuł Instagram pochodzi z serwisu BrandStruck.

Smirnoff

by Magda Adamska @ BrandStruck

Category: FMCG Alcoholic beverages – vodka, gin and other spirits, alcopops Owner of the brand: Diageo Key competitors: Absolut, Khortytsa, Żubrówka, Svedka, Skyy, Grey Goose

Artykuł Smirnoff pochodzi z serwisu BrandStruck.

National Geographic

by Magda Adamska @ BrandStruck

Category: Media & entertainment – TV channels, magazines; Non-profit organisations; Kids products – publishing & media; Education & art – educational resources; Travel & transportation – tour operators; Retail – e-retail Owner of the brand: National Geographic Partners LLC (a joint venture between 21st Century Fox – 73% and the National Geographic Society – 27%) Key competitors: […]

Artykuł National Geographic pochodzi z serwisu BrandStruck.

Video production: From a brand to an idea

Video production: From a brand to an idea


MWP Digital Media

As you might imagine, great video marketing ideas are rarely plucked out of thin air and devising a winning concept is far from effortless.

The State of IoT in the Home: Part 2

by Ed Terpening @ Prophet Thinking

Opportunities and challenges for brands selling IoT products for the home.

The post The State of IoT in the Home: Part 2 appeared first on Prophet Thinking.

How to build your brand positioning statement around benefit clusters

by Graham Robertson @ Beloved Brands

The reality with most brands is that great brands can do a few things, that give the consumer a few different functional benefits and a few different emotional benefits. One of the tools I work Read more…

The post How to build your brand positioning statement around benefit clusters appeared first on Beloved Brands.

Intel

by Magda Adamska @ BrandStruck

Category: Electronics & technology – semiconductors, computer hardware Owner of the brand: Intel Corporation Key competitors: IBM, Samsung, AMD, Texas Instruments, Nvidia

Artykuł Intel pochodzi z serwisu BrandStruck.

The State of IoT in the Home: Part 1

by Ed Terpening @ Prophet Thinking

How brands can be relevant to IoT device buyers.

The post The State of IoT in the Home: Part 1 appeared first on Prophet Thinking.

Accenture

by Magda Adamska @ BrandStruck

Category: Professional services – technological solutions, management consulting Owner of the brand: Accenture PLC Key competitors: McKinsey, Deloitte, BCG, Bain, IBM, Capgemini

Artykuł Accenture pochodzi z serwisu BrandStruck.

brand laddering

brand laddering


Marketoonist | Tom Fishburne

“Brand Laddering” is one of the most common marketing tools. To drive growth and loyalty, marketers frequently work to elevate benefits of the brand from technical to functional to emot…

The reasons why so many Marketers suck at Advertising! Here is how you can get better!

by Graham Robertson @ Beloved Brands

I always get asked “So what is it that makes some Marketers great at advertising?”.  To me, the best Marketers are able to get great advertising on the air and keep bad advertising off the Read more…

The post The reasons why so many Marketers suck at Advertising! Here is how you can get better! appeared first on Beloved Brands.

Marks & Spencer

by Magda Adamska @ BrandStruck

Category: Retail – grocery stores, fashion stores, e-retail; Apparel – high street apparel; Financial services – banks; Energy Owner of the brand: Marks and Spencer plc Key competitors: Waitrose, Sainsbury’s, Tesco, John Lewis, Next, Debenhams

Artykuł Marks & Spencer pochodzi z serwisu BrandStruck.

Allianz

by Magda Adamska @ BrandStruck

Category: Financial services – insurance companies, asset management Owner of the brand: Allianz SE Key competitors: AXA,  Aegon, Generali, ING, Aviva

Artykuł Allianz pochodzi z serwisu BrandStruck.

Shell

by Magda Adamska @ BrandStruck

Category: Energy  Owner of the brand: Royal Dutch Shell plc Key competitors: ExxonMobil, BP, Chevron, Total

Artykuł Shell pochodzi z serwisu BrandStruck.

McDonald’s service hits rock bottom in drive thru ratings

by Graham Robertson @ Beloved Brands

McDonald’s was founded on the basis of customer service. Ray Kroc, the original McDonald’s CEO put huge emphasis on a customer first mentality: “McDonald’s is a people business, and that smile on that counter girl’s face Read more…

The post McDonald’s service hits rock bottom in drive thru ratings appeared first on Beloved Brands.

Dove: The Most Impressive Brand Builder | Aaker on Brands

Dove: The Most Impressive Brand Builder | Aaker on Brands


Prophet Thinking

Dove has grown tremendously in an intensively competitive arena with established competitors largely through their brand building efforts. Learn more.

Tumblr

by Magda Adamska @ BrandStruck

Category: Media & entertainment – social media Owner of the brand: Yahoo Inc. Key competitors: Instagram, Snapchat, Pinterest, Medium

Artykuł Tumblr pochodzi z serwisu BrandStruck.

TFI Envision Delivers Two Standard® Diesel Ad Campaigns

by TFI Envision, Inc. @ TFI Envision, Inc.

Long Island City, NY — Standard Motor Products turned again to TFI Envision to develop an ad campaign for their Standard® Diesel brand. TFI Envision created a powerful ad campaign to position the Standard® Diesel brand as the ‘go to’ line of diesel auto parts with an extensive line of unique products in many diesel ...

Dove

Dove


Integrated Brands

Unilever, a typical house of brands, is the global leader in the personal care market. Each brand in Unilever’s personal care business is precisely targeted to a specific group of consumers with a distinct value proposition to minimize cannibalization. …

PayPal

by Magda Adamska @ BrandStruck

Category: Financial services – payment solutions Owner of the brand: PayPal Holdings, Inc. Key competitors: Visa, Mastercard, American Express, Discover, Stripe, Amazon Payments, Android Pay

Artykuł PayPal pochodzi z serwisu BrandStruck.

McGraw-Hill Education

by Magda Adamska @ BrandStruck

Category: Education & art – educational resources; Media & entertainment – publishers Owner of the brand: Apollo Global Management, LLC Key competitors: Pearson, Kaplan, Cengage Learning, Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

Artykuł McGraw-Hill Education pochodzi z serwisu BrandStruck.

KitKat

by Magda Adamska @ BrandStruck

Category: FMCG Food – confectionery and chocolate, desserts & ice creams Owner of the brand: Nestlé S.A., The Hershey Company (US) Key competitors: Snickers, Toblerone, Cadbury, Hershey’s, Butterfinger

Artykuł KitKat pochodzi z serwisu BrandStruck.

Dove

Dove


Hindustan Unilever Limited website

Dove grew from a moisturising Beauty Bar into a global brand with a range of products: body washes, hand and body lotions, facial cleansers, deodorants, shampoos, conditioners and hair styling.

Miu Miu

by Magda Adamska @ BrandStruck

Category: Apparel – luxury apparel; FMCG Personal care & beauty – fragrances; Retail – fashion stores, e-retail Owner of the brand: Prada SpA Group Key competitors: Louis Vuitton, Gucci, Hermès, Ralph Lauren

Artykuł Miu Miu pochodzi z serwisu BrandStruck.

Xbox

by Magda Adamska @ BrandStruck

Category: Electronics & technology – video game consoles; Media & entertainment – games, streaming services Owner of the brand: Microsoft Corporation Key competitors: PlayStation, Nintendo

Artykuł Xbox pochodzi z serwisu BrandStruck.

How to Tell the Story of Your Brand

How to Tell the Story of Your Brand

by larissa pickens @ Journal - Creative Digital & Design Agency for Beauty and LIfestyle Brands

Traditional advertising has never been more ubiquitous. From the billboards commuters pass on their highway journeys to the bus wraps city dwellers walk by every day, marketing messages are everywhere.

The onslaught continues every time we go online. From banner ads to pop-ups, those enticements to buy are everywhere we turn. The more advertising becomes an integral part of daily life, the more the messages fade into the background.

If you want to break through the clutter and avoid the advertising overload, try telling the story of your brand instead.

Over the years, jaded consumers have come to ignore or be suspicious of traditional advertising messages. Even so, those same consumers still love a good story, and making the story of your brand a compelling one could be your key to success.

So how do you tell the story of your brand? Many business owners have never thought about this before, so it helps to take a step back and start at the beginning. Every great story starts with a great hook, so think about the factors that caused you to start your business in the first place. Maybe you identified an unmet need or recognized an underserved market niche. Maybe the origin of your business stemmed from a personal frustration or a unique experience. Whatever that origin story is, it is the perfect starting point for the story of your brand.

No matter how successful your business is now, chances are you did not do it alone. Be sure to acknowledge the contributions of the mentors, partners, investors and visionaries who helped you turn your dream of a business and a brand into a successful reality.

If your brand features a distinctive logo, your story can include tales of its creation. Many people wonder where those iconic brands came from, from the Nike swoosh to the famous McDonalds golden arches. Your brand and logo may not be as easily recognizable as those two examples, so use your story to tell the tale.

The name of your company plays a big role in the story of your brand, so talk about how the name was chosen, what it means to you and what it has come to symbolize for your customers. It is clear that brand names can have one meaning for the company founders and a different meaning for customers, so play up that conflict when telling the compelling story of your brand.

How many Google users know that the term actually refers to an almost incomprehensibly large number, or that the original Amazons were large, powerful women? The stories behind those iconic names are fascinating in themselves, and they can play a starring role in your own brand identity and the story you tell.

Do not avoid conflict as you tell the story of your brand. Every story needs a touch of drama, and chances are your own rise has not been conflict-free. You do not need to overdramatize what happened or stray from the truth; just talk openly and honestly about the history of your company and the challenges you overcome to be where you are today.

 You may not think that the story of your brand is that interesting, or that consumers will find it compelling. But once you start to tell the tale, you will see just how fascinating, how unusual and how personal the story of your brand really is. It will also engage your customers on a personal level and make your brand stand out in a crowded market.


Lynx

by Magda Adamska @ BrandStruck

Category: FMCG Personal care & beauty – body care, deodorants, fragrances, hair care Owner of the brand: Unilever Key competitors: Nivea, L’Oréal, Gillette, Old Spice

Artykuł Lynx pochodzi z serwisu BrandStruck.

Starbucks

by Magda Adamska @ BrandStruck

Category: Restaurants – coffee shops; FMCG Non-alcoholic beverages – coffee Owner of the brand: Starbucks Corporation Key competitors: McDonald’s, Dunkin’ Donuts, Costa Coffee, Tim Hortons

Artykuł Starbucks pochodzi z serwisu BrandStruck.

Brand Purpose - Marketing Week

Brand Purpose - Marketing Week


Marketing Week

From company vision to defined mission statements, here is all the news, analysis and insight on embedding values into your brand’s DNA.

Corona

by Magda Adamska @ BrandStruck

Category: FMCG Alcoholic beverages – beer & cider Owner of the brand: Anheuser-Busch InBev Key competitors: Heineken, Coors, Miller, Carlsberg, Grolsch, Stella Artois, Fosters

Artykuł Corona pochodzi z serwisu BrandStruck.

Unilever

by Magda Adamska @ BrandStruck

Category: FMCG Food; FMCG Non-alcoholic beverages; FMCG Household products; FMCG Personal care & beauty Owner of the brand: Unilever Key competitors: Procter & Gamble, Nestlé, Colgate-Palmolive, The Kraft Heinz Company, Reckitt Benckiser Group

Artykuł Unilever pochodzi z serwisu BrandStruck.

Brand Innovation Drives New Retail Strategy

by Chris Wren @ Branding Strategy Insider

It’s not easy to be a retail brand these days. Every few weeks it seems there is yet another story about some major retailer either abandoning or downsizing multiple locations. Online shopping has fundamentally changed the way consumers buy as well as the ways brands sell. It’s hard to show an industry that has been […]

Mastercard

by Magda Adamska @ BrandStruck

Category: Financial services – payment solutions Owner of the brand: Mastercard Inc. Key competitors: Visa, American Express, Discover, PayPal

Artykuł Mastercard pochodzi z serwisu BrandStruck.

Dove

Dove


Unilever Pakistan

Dove grew from a moisturising Beauty Bar into a global brand with a range of products: body washes, hand and body lotions, facial cleansers, deodorants, shampoos, conditioners and hair styling.

Passive Marketing: How Customers Hate to Be Sold but Love to Buy

Passive Marketing: How Customers Hate to Be Sold but Love to Buy

by larissa pickens @ Journal - Creative Digital & Design Agency for Beauty and LIfestyle Brands

An old business saying goes "People don't like to be sold — but they love to buy." While traditional advertising still has it's place, many consumers are now conditioned to tune it out — especially if it's not personalized to their situation or the timing of the delivery is off. The modern, digital consumer is much more demanding and marketers need to take a more nuanced approach to connect with them.

 

Why people hate to be sold

The concept of the sleazy salesman dies hard. There is a certain resentment involved when someone has more knowledge about a situation or product and can potentially use that edge against you. As customers, we want to feel we're the ones in control and making decisions that are in our best interests rather than having someone else tell us what to do.

The same holds true for marketing. No matter how honest or well-reasoned the pitch is, at the end of the day, a prospective client still sees it as exactly that...a sales pitch. 

 

Why people love to buy

On the other hand, there is an intense joy involved when people add value to their lives. Finding a service or product that improves their lives and solves a nagging problem creates the sensation of satisfaction, even happiness. This bliss isn't just from huge, life-changing purchases like real estate and cars but can come from small personal indulgences as well. The more closely aligned the customer is with your brand, the more likely they are to feel emotionally engaged and confident about the value of their purchase.

 

How to convince the visitor to be a customer

The predicament is this: how can a marketer convince a client to buy an item rather than sell that item to him? 

Identify your customer's core problem and use that need as a springboard for your messaging. Target a specific concern that your niche demographic has and demonstrate how your product is the solution to that specific problem. Focus on the emotional elements of the problem — and how it will feel to overcome the problem with help from your product.

Of course, identifying your customer's needs takes some time and effort. You can do this by conducting interviews, reading customer reviews, or using surveys to collect feedback. As your research progresses, you will collect not only the problem customers are attempting to solve, but the language they use to describe it. That way you can start to use their own language to craft a message that will have speak to them directly. 

At the heart of inbound marketing is giving customers the joy associated with having figured out the solution (e.g. your product) for themselves and the gratification of shopping for that item.

 

Walking the fine line between selling and pushing

Being an adept marketer today sometimes means being decisively passive. That may sound like an oxymoron, but it is actually a targeted strategy. Rather than an aggressive push for sales, let the clients know that you have the means to make their lives better. Educate them and guide them make their own decision. By giving them the fulfillment of independence and the pleasure of being a smart consumer, you will gain their trust and patronage.


5 Branding Rules to Live By - Partners Blog

5 Branding Rules to Live By - Partners Blog


Partners Blog

How do you build a successful brand? Building a brand and creating a sustainable business go hand in hand. Read more.

BBC

by Magda Adamska @ BrandStruck

Category: Media & entertainment – TV channels, radio stations, publishers, streaming services Owner of the brand: Government of the United Kingdom Key competitors: ITV, Channel 4, Sky, CNN, Netflix

Artykuł BBC pochodzi z serwisu BrandStruck.

Canon

by Magda Adamska @ BrandStruck

Category: Electronics & technology – cameras, office equipment, healthcare solutions Owner of the brand: Canon, Inc. Key competitors: Nikon, Sony, Konica Minolta, Olympus, Xerox, HP

Artykuł Canon pochodzi z serwisu BrandStruck.

How marketers are stepping up to take control of media

by Thomas Hobbs @ Marketing Week

Media transparency has become a major issue, but brands including Pernod Ricard, O2 and B&Q are taking steps to ensure they have more control and a better understanding of where their spend is going.

The post How marketers are stepping up to take control of media appeared first on Marketing Week.

The Controversy Behind Conflicting Messages from Axe and Dove

The Controversy Behind Conflicting Messages from Axe and Dove


TheRichest

Unilever has been plagued by controversies from the two brands it owns: Axe and Dove. Both products are hugely in contrast in their advertising campaigns. Of course, Unilever continues to maintain uni

Gap

by Magda Adamska @ BrandStruck

Category: Apparel – high street apparel; Retail – fashion stores, e-retail Owner of the brand: Gap Inc. Key competitors: H&M, Zara, Uniqlo, Levi’s, Benetton, Topshop, Forever 21

Artykuł Gap pochodzi z serwisu BrandStruck.

Snickers

by Magda Adamska @ BrandStruck

Category: FMCG Food – confectionery and chocolate, desserts & ice creams Owner of the brand: Mars, Inc. Key competitors: KitKat, Toblerone, Cadbury, Hershey’s, Butterfinger

Artykuł Snickers pochodzi z serwisu BrandStruck.

Roberto Cavalli

by Magda Adamska @ BrandStruck

Category: Apparel – luxury apparel; FMCG Personal care & beauty – fragrances; Retail – fashion stores, e-retail Owner of the brand: Clessidra SGR S.p.A. (90%) and Roberto Cavalli (10%) Key competitors: Gucci, Valentino, Versace, Prada, Armani, Dolce & Gabbana

Artykuł Roberto Cavalli pochodzi z serwisu BrandStruck.

Emotional brand storytelling: how risky is too risky?

by Chris Fowles @ MWP Digital Media

As video producers, MWP Digital Media is increasingly asked by our clients in briefing sessions to “make it risky”. It’s always great news to hear that clients want to take creative risks – it’ll certainly get you more attention than playing it safe. Gone are the days of ‘demo’ advertising with dry, product focused videos. It’s […]

The post Emotional brand storytelling: how risky is too risky? appeared first on MWP Digital Media.

Love at First Sight: First Impressions and Why Good Design Matters

Love at First Sight: First Impressions and Why Good Design Matters

by larissa pickens @ Journal - Creative Digital & Design Agency for Beauty and LIfestyle Brands

First impressions count. From the moment you walk into a store or load a website, you get a sense of what a brand is about. And you’ll instantly make judgments about its trustworthiness and authority — whether you’re conscious of doing this or not.
It only takes 50 milliseconds (0.05 seconds) for a user to form an opinion about a website. And first impressions are 94% design related. The opinion of the user —  good or bad — depends on several key factors.

How does this impact your ecommerce business?

From the time it takes your site to load, to the choice of colors and photographs, to the usability and functionality of your site — it all leaves an impression. Whether you’re strictly an online business or have an online presence to support your brick and mortar location, it’s important to consider what impression you’re making on your visitors.

Here are a few things to consider:


How Users Assess Trustworthiness

1. Users Determine a Website’s Credibility by Design

• 75% of customers make judgments about a company’s credibility based on their website’s overall design

• 46.2% of participants assessed the credibility of ecommerce sites based specifically on the visual design of a site, including layout, typography, font size and color schemes.

 

“I would like to think that when people go on the Web they're very tough integrators of information, they compare sources, they think really hard,” says experimental psychologist B.J. Fogg, “but the truth of the matter—and I didn't want to find this in the research but it's very clear—is that people do judge a Web site by how it looks. That’s the first test of the Web site. And if it doesn't look credible or it doesn’t look like what they expect it to be, they go elsewhere. It doesn't get a second test.”

 

Despite users claiming to value breadth and depth of information on a site, only 6% commented on the actual content of the website. This shows most users won’t stay on a poorly designed website long enough to actually evaluate the deeper levels of content.

No matter how good your products are, to get a user to stay on your website long enough to make a sale, you need a website that looks professional and inspires confidence.


2. Keep Designs Simple and Familiar

Google researchers have explored the interconnection of two design factors and found that they work together to create a good impression.

  • Visual complexity — how complex the visual design of a website looks

  • Prototypicality — how representative a design looks for a certain category of websites

They found that users strongly preferred websites that appeared to have low complexity and high prototypicality — in other words, websites that looked easy to use and looked similar to other websites they are familiar with. Furthermore, users need both together to create a consistently good impression.

Most consumers come to ecommerce websites with an existing idea of how they function and look. For beauty and lifestyle brands, with web savvy and visually fickle consumers, a poorly or even an unexpectedly designed website can turn away potential customers.


Eye tracking results of users in seconds

3. Know What Forms the First Impression by Following the Eyes

An eye tracking study at Missouri University explored where users spent their viewing time in assessing a new website:

  • Site’s main image: 5.94 seconds

  • Written content: 5.59 seconds

  • Footer: 5.25 seconds

  • Logo:  6.48 seconds

  • Navigation Menu: 6.44 seconds

  • Search box: Just over 6 seconds

 

“Thus, our study provides an evidence that users care for how and where the website can be navigated followed by body of the homepage. The quantitative results from interview also indicate that users’ first impressions are highly affected by several design factors like use of colors, font types and size, use of images, easier navigation and so on.”

 

Knowing this pattern makes it essential that these elements be well designed and clear on your website. Good design must clearly demonstrate to the user where they are, what’s there, and where they can go. For most ecommerce sites, this means making products and their benefits front and center.



4. First Impressions Are Stubbornly Difficult to Change

The cliche, “You never get a second chance to make a first impression” is now supported by recent psychological research. After people have created a bad first impression, they will remember positive impressions as “exceptions to the rule” rather than re-write their initial impression.

 

“The first impression will dominate regardless of how often it is contradicted by new experiences.” 

— Bertram Gawronski

 

While it’s tempting to focus on developing the product and skimp on “extras” such as design, a poorly designed website can actually hurt your brand — even long after it has been replaced. If the design is giving a negative impression or seems suspicious, cheap, or unprofessional, you not only lose a sale but will have a lot of work later to change the customer’s mind.


To make a long story short, great products are not enough. Consumers implicitly trust brands that have invested in design — whether they are conscious of it or not.

Good design tells your users that you care about them. That you are willing to invest in your brand. That your products don’t represent a race to the lowest price but stands for quality. 

Good design differentiates extraordinary brands. It makes your website feel trustworthy and encourages visitors to stay and become buyers, buyers to return and become fans.

How does your website stack up?


ITV

by Magda Adamska @ BrandStruck

Category: Media & entertainment – TV channels, streaming services Owner of the brand: ITV plc Key competitors: BBC, Channel 4, Sky, Netflix

Artykuł ITV pochodzi z serwisu BrandStruck.

Kellogg’s

by Magda Adamska @ BrandStruck

Category: FMCG Food – cereals Owner of the brand: Kellogg Company Key competitors: Cheerios, Nestlé, Cinnamon Toast Crunch, Lucky Charms, Weetabix, Quaker

Artykuł Kellogg’s pochodzi z serwisu BrandStruck.

Diesel

by Magda Adamska @ BrandStruck

Category: Apparel – high street apparel; FMCG Personal care & beauty – fragrances; Retail – fashion stores, e-retail Owner of the brand: OTB Group Key competitors: Levi’s, Wrangler, Pepe Jeans, Lee

Artykuł Diesel pochodzi z serwisu BrandStruck.

CanOWater on its hopes to take canned water mainstream

by Leonie Roderick @ Marketing Week

The water brand is hoping to solve the world’s plastic problem by 'building a cult of people' who will encourage others to switch from bottles to aluminium cans.

The post CanOWater on its hopes to take canned water mainstream appeared first on Marketing Week.

10 Questions To Ask When Crafting Brand Stories

by Derrick Daye @ Branding Strategy Insider

Branding Strategy Insider helps marketing oriented leaders and professionals like you build strong brands. BSI readers know, we regularly answer questions from marketers everywhere. Today we hear from Lawrence a brand manager from Dallas, Texas who has this question about crafting brand stories. “We are about to embark on an internal effort to shape a […]

Dove

Dove


Unilever Australasia

In a world of stereotypes, Dove Skin, Hair and Deodorant products, recognise that beauty comes in all shapes and sizes.

What’s Your Brand Archetype?

What’s Your Brand Archetype?


Creative Digital & Design Agency for Beauty and LIfestyle Brands

How to Improve Communication and Attract Ideal CustomersAccording to Jung, archetypes are universal patterns of behaviors that, once discovered, can help people better understand themselves and how they relate to others. In their book, The Hero and the Outlaw Margaret Mark and Carol S. Pea

British Airways

by Magda Adamska @ BrandStruck

Category: Travel & transportation – airlines Owner of the brand: International Airline Group, S.A. Key competitors: Lufthansa, KLM, Air France, Virgin, Emirates Airline, Delta Air Lines, American Airlines, United Airlines

Artykuł British Airways pochodzi z serwisu BrandStruck.

Pantone Honors Prince With His Own Shade Of Purple

by TFI Envision, Inc. @ TFI Envision, Inc.

USA – Pantone has released a brand new color to recognize pop icon Prince’s contributions to music, art, fashion and culture. The color, dubbed Love Symbol #2, is a deep purple hue that the company said was designed to be “emblematic of Prince’s distinctive style.” The shade’s name is a nod to the “love symbol” formed ...

HP

by Magda Adamska @ BrandStruck

Category: Electronics & technology – computers, tablets, office equipment; Professional services – technological solutions; Retail – e-retail Owner of the brand: HP Inc. Key competitors: Apple, Samsung, Microsoft, Lenovo, Xerox, Canon

Artykuł HP pochodzi z serwisu BrandStruck.

Ricardo Pimenta

Ricardo Pimenta


Saving Promise

Ricardo Pimenta Ricardo Pimenta is an international marketer with a passion for leading purposeful global brands with a positive social impact. His most recent assignment was Global Brand Vice-President for Unilever's Vaseline. Under his guidance, Vaseline charted its fastest growing period in recorded history, making

SAP

by Magda Adamska @ BrandStruck

Category: Electronics & technology – software; Professional services – technological solutions Owner of the brand: SAP SE Key competitors: IBM, Oracle, Microsoft, Salesforce, Sage

Artykuł SAP pochodzi z serwisu BrandStruck.

Airbnb

by Magda Adamska @ BrandStruck

Category: Travel & transportation – e-travel; Sharing economy Owner of the brand: Airbnb, Inc. Key competitors: FlipKey, HomeAway, Expedia, Couchsurfing, Booking.com, Agoda, TripAdvisor

Artykuł Airbnb pochodzi z serwisu BrandStruck.

LinkedIn

by Magda Adamska @ BrandStruck

Category: Media & entertainment – social media Owner of the brand: Microsoft Corporation Key competitors: Viadeo, Facebook, Google, Twitter, Medium

Artykuł LinkedIn pochodzi z serwisu BrandStruck.

Prada

by Magda Adamska @ BrandStruck

Category: Apparel – luxury apparel; FMCG Personal care & beauty – fragrances; Retail – fashion stores, e-retail Owner of the brand: Prada SpA Group Key competitors: Louis Vuitton, Gucci, Hermès, Ralph Lauren

Artykuł Prada pochodzi z serwisu BrandStruck.

Dove release male grooming range - Dove Men+Care - Ape to Gentleman

Dove release male grooming range - Dove Men+Care - Ape to Gentleman


Ape to Gentleman

The new proposition, targeting the more mature man, is the UK's only range to offer a shower and deodorant specifically designed for these men.

The miraculous transition of China is happening, but it may take the entire century to complete.

by Graham Robertson @ Beloved Brands

I am a Canadian who has done consulting and training work in China. These are my observations of my most recent trips.  China is in the midst of rapid growth that will continue to transform Read more…

The post The miraculous transition of China is happening, but it may take the entire century to complete. appeared first on Beloved Brands.

Morrisons on how staff are inspiring both its marketing and turnaround

by Thomas Hobbs @ Marketing Week

Morrisons' top marketer discusses the brand's ongoing turnaround, the Amazon deal and his expectations for Christmas.

The post Morrisons on how staff are inspiring both its marketing and turnaround appeared first on Marketing Week.

3 Branding Lessons From Dove for Startups

3 Branding Lessons From Dove for Startups


YourStory.com

Over the last few years, we have seen tons of startups build apps and products. If you’re starting off today, the bigger question is not what you build but how you get people to notice what you do. A lot of FMCG (Fast Moving Consumer Goods) companies face the same issue. After all, a soap is a soap is a soap, right? How do you get people to think of it differently?

Mars Chocolate & Candy Brands

Mars Chocolate & Candy Brands


Mars, Incorporated

Learn more about Mars Chocolate, candy brands and global confectionary products at Mars, Incorporated.

How can a junk business be the best consumer experience of any brand I’ve ever seen

by Graham Robertson @ Beloved Brands

Having been in our current house for 16 years, as our kids have gone from 4 up to 20 years old, we have naturally accumulated a lot of junk. Sure they are memories, but at Read more…

The post How can a junk business be the best consumer experience of any brand I’ve ever seen appeared first on Beloved Brands.

Greenpeace

by Magda Adamska @ BrandStruck

Category: Non-profit organisations Owner of the brand: Greenpeace Key competitors: WWF, Sierra Club, Friends of the Earth, Natural Resources Defense Council, The Nature Conservancy

Artykuł Greenpeace pochodzi z serwisu BrandStruck.

Uniqlo

by Magda Adamska @ BrandStruck

Category: Apparel – high street apparel; Retail – fashion stores, e-retail Owner of the brand: Fast Retailing Co., Ltd Key competitors: H&M, Zara, Gap, Levi’s, Benetton, Topshop, Forever 21

Artykuł Uniqlo pochodzi z serwisu BrandStruck.

Dove needs to refocus on honesty, not rely on 'stunts'

Dove needs to refocus on honesty, not rely on 'stunts'


Campaign Asia

Dove is losing sight of its strengths following a string of attention-seeking ads this year, industry leaders have warned.

Under Armour

by Magda Adamska @ BrandStruck

Category: Apparel – sportswear Owner of the brand: Under Armour, Inc. Key competitors: Nike, Adidas, Reebok, Puma

Artykuł Under Armour pochodzi z serwisu BrandStruck.

AXA

by Magda Adamska @ BrandStruck

Category: Financial services – insurance companies, asset management Owner of the brand: The AXA Group Key competitors: Allianz,  Aegon, Generali, ING, Aviva

Artykuł AXA pochodzi z serwisu BrandStruck.

Your content promotion strategy needs to improve. Here’s why

by Liam Walters @ MWP Digital Media

Content promotion is the part of content marketing that’s often forgotten about. So what is it and why do you need a content promotion strategy for your brand’s film or video?

The post Your content promotion strategy needs to improve. Here’s why appeared first on MWP Digital Media.

Aviva

by Magda Adamska @ BrandStruck

Category: Financial services – insurance companies, asset management Owner of the brand: Aviva plc Key competitors: Axa, Allianz, Aegon, Generali, ING

Artykuł Aviva pochodzi z serwisu BrandStruck.

Dove Go Fresh

Dove Go Fresh


FUSSFACTORY

Dove launched in 1957 with a revolutionary cleansing bar made with a patented blend of mild cleansers and ¼ moisturizing cream. Building on the foundation of that iconic Beauty Bar, Dove has grown into one of the world’s most recognizable personal care brands.This offering is a full line o

Audi

by Magda Adamska @ BrandStruck

Category: Automotive – cars, luxury cars, car accessories Owner of the brand: Volkswagen Group Key competitors: Mercedes-Benz, BMW

Artykuł Audi pochodzi z serwisu BrandStruck.

Ariel

by Magda Adamska @ BrandStruck

Category: FMCG Household products – laundry products Owner of the brand: Procter & Gamble Co. Key competitors: Persil, Surf, Omo

Artykuł Ariel pochodzi z serwisu BrandStruck.

snackable content

by tomfishburne @ Marketoonist | Tom Fishburne

Havas Media recently reported that 60% of content created by the world’s leading 1,500 brands is “just clutter,” defined as “poor, irrelevant or fails to deliver.” This conclusion was part of their annual Meaningful Brands study, which measures outcomes for brands that form “meaningful” connections with consumers. However, Havas found a 71% correlation between brands that create meaningful content and…

Uber brand takes another hit as it loses London licence

by Sarah Vizard @ Marketing Week

Transport for London says Uber is not “fit and proper” to hold a private hire operator licence as it raises concerns over a lack of corporate responsibility.

The post Uber brand takes another hit as it loses London licence appeared first on Marketing Week.

Spotify

by Magda Adamska @ BrandStruck

Category: Media & entertainment – streaming services Owner of the brand: Spotify Technology S.A. Key competitors: Tidal, Deezer, Pandora, Apple Music, Amazon Music, Google Play Music, YouTube

Artykuł Spotify pochodzi z serwisu BrandStruck.

Pizza Hut

by Magda Adamska @ BrandStruck

Category: Restaurants – casual restaurants, fast food chains Owner of the brand: Yum! Brands, Inc. Key competitors: McDonald’s, KFC, Burger King, Domino’s Pizza, Papa John’s

Artykuł Pizza Hut pochodzi z serwisu BrandStruck.

Dove | BrandStruck: Brand strategy database

Dove | BrandStruck: Brand strategy database


BrandStruck

Category: FMCG Personal care & beauty – hair care, body care, deodorants Owner of the brand: Unilever Key competitors: L’Oréal, Garnier, Nivea, Olay, Avon

Case Study: The Emotional Pull of Beauty Brands - Usabilla Blog

Case Study: The Emotional Pull of Beauty Brands - Usabilla Blog


Usabilla Blog

We recently wrote about how beauty brands seduce you with emotional design. It was great fun to look at different beauty brands, identify emotional concepts on their websites and make assumptions on how they draw us in. To back up

Heineken

by Magda Adamska @ BrandStruck

Category: FMCG Alcoholic beverages – beer & cider Owner of the brand: Heineken International Key competitors: Corona, Carlsberg, Grolsch, Stella Artois, Fosters, Budweiser, Coors, Miller

Artykuł Heineken pochodzi z serwisu BrandStruck.

Always

by Magda Adamska @ BrandStruck

Category: FMCG Personal care & beauty – feminine care Owner of the brand: Procter & Gamble Co. Key competitors: Carefree, Bodyform, Kotex, o.b., Stayfree

Artykuł Always pochodzi z serwisu BrandStruck.

Snapchat

by Magda Adamska @ BrandStruck

Category: Media & entertainment – social media Owner of the brand: Snap, Inc. Key competitors: Facebook, Instagram, Twitter

Artykuł Snapchat pochodzi z serwisu BrandStruck.

Procter & Gamble

by Magda Adamska @ BrandStruck

Category: FMCG Household products; FMCG Personal care & beauty Owner of the brand: Procter & Gamble Co. Key competitors: Unilever, Colgate-Palmolive, Reckitt Benckiser Group

Artykuł Procter & Gamble pochodzi z serwisu BrandStruck.

How to Build a Brand: The Brand Interview

How to Build a Brand: The Brand Interview

by larissa pickens @ Journal - Creative Digital & Design Agency for Beauty and LIfestyle Brands

You may have heard it said that brand is the sum of what your customers say about your business when you're not in the room to hear. And it's true that to some extent, your brand is outside of your control. However when you carefully create your voice, tone and position statements, you control a great deal about how your brand will be perceived. As long as your brand lives up to the set of brand guidelines you create, chances are good that your customers will understand the essence of your brand.

Whether you're just starting out or taking a second look at your brand pillars, a brand interview can be an excellent first step in discovering your brand.

 

Main Requirement: An Open Mind

Part of the brand interview involves agreeing in rote information: what is your company's ultimate vision? How do you intend to achieve that vision? Who is your main competition?

But the art of building a brand happens when you dig deeper into more ethereal questions--and that requires an open mind.

Come to your brand interview without an expectation of where you think you'll end up. Instead, use a series of associational exercises and explore all the alleyways and avenues your answers take you down.

 

3 Types of Associational Exercises

There are plenty of associational exercises to choose from. For the sake of brevity, I've selected three popular exercises: the Lightning Round, A vs. B and the Visual Exercise.

 

The Lightning Round

During the Lightning Round, you will be presented with a series of questions and asked to provide an answer as quickly as you can. The questions can range from the seemingly mundane (If you were a sandwich, what kind of sandwich would you be?) to the more fantastical (Name a super power your brand would have).

The useful information is derived not from the answer you give, but rather from the reason behind the answer. For example, if your first thought was that your brand resembled a peanut butter sandwich, you may discover some insights about your brand by examining the reason for your answer. Perhaps you answered in this way because your brand and your produce is a staple in your industry. Maybe you always associated peanut butter sandwiches with comfort and simplicity and that is the kind of notion you want your customers to feel when they interact with your brand. Whatever the reason, it is important to take the time to deeply examine them once you answer all the Lightning Round questions.

An easy way to get started is to discover your Brand Archetype which will help guide you.

 

A vs. B

An exercise similar to the Lightning Round is A vs. B. During this exercise, you are presented with two options and are asked to decide which option you believe your brand more closely associates itself with. For example: Apple vs. Google. Simply decide whether your brand is more like Apple or more like Google.

Like the Lightning Round, the actual answer is not as important as the reason behind your answer. People hear the options and relate them to different things. Whatever the answer was, take the time to explore the reasons behind your choice. As you continue through each set of A vs. B, chances are good that you will begin to notice certain similarities behind your answers. As the pattern emerges, so will certain core brand traits and elements. As you discover these, you will be able to use them as foundational pieces for building your brand.

A simple way to get started with this is to make a paper with two columns, the first column is what your brand stands for, the second is what it is not. For example "Feminine but not girly", "Professional but not impersonal," "Upbeat but not obnoxious," etc.

 

Visual Exercises

Brands are deeply visual, so it's equally important to include a visual component to the brand interview. This is often called moodboards and can be done in a number of ways from a Pinterest board to cut outs magazines to more professional presentations. What's most important is not the style it is created in (your customers will never see these initial visuals) but finding the images that resonate most with your brand.

 

Putting It All Together

Brand interviews can and should be a lot of fun, but they're hard work and they yield a lot of information in a short amount of time. Once you complete the interview and the associational exercises, let your answers breathe for a bit. Come back to it after a day or two and analyze the results. Look for similarities and explore differences. Bring in a second opinion if necessary. Brands aren't built overnight, so it's critical that you take the time needed to get it right.


Commentaires sur The most desired US brands by women … and men par Etude : les femmes et la technologie « Les News du planning

by Etude : les femmes et la technologie « Les News du planning @ Commentaires pour Womenology

[...] La plupart des marques des secteurs concernés n’ont pas perçu ce potentiel de consommation et ont délaissés les femmes dans leurs stratégies. À l’inverse, ceux qui comme Sony ont eu du flair se sont vus récompenser : avec des actions comme « Sony loves Women ! » ou la commercialisation d’une PSP Pink (première console portable conçue pour les femmes), le groupe nippon a réussi à devenir la 2e marque préférée des consommatrices américaines. [...]

When Is It Time For Your Brand To Invest In Design?

When Is It Time For Your Brand To Invest In Design?

by larissa pickens @ Journal - Creative Digital & Design Agency for Beauty and LIfestyle Brands

Knowing the right time to invest in design is something I see a lot of start-ups and entrepreneurs struggling with. Of course as a designer, I’d first like to say that it’s never a bad time to have great design! However I also know when you’re first starting out and have a concept, a limited budget and a million things to do to get your idea off the ground, it’s a balancing act.

I recently spoke with a group of agency owners and the conversation turned to how the design industry is becoming commodified with services such as Fiverr, 99Designs, and Upwork. Most see it as a threat to our industry and want to fight against it.

However I take a different view. I think for brands just starting out, these services can be a simple way to get a brand going and a site up quickly, test out your concept with a MVP (minimum viable product) and see if you can start building traction. I actually think it’s a reasonable approach if you are starting with very limited funding.

The problem is if your brand starts getting traction and growing, you’ll eventually find that the design is holding you back. Knowing when this happens can be tricky. 

It’s is often hard for customers to articulate that it’s the design that's turning them away from your brand. Likely they won’t put their finger on the design — they just know something feels a little off, they are mistrustful and aren’t clear about the value of the product. Distributors and retailers might be more savvy and pinpoint the design but only if you’ve done a good job convincing them on the value of the product elsewhere.

Comments I’ve hear from clients in this phase include:

 
  • We get a lot of traffic from a PPC ad campaign but they bounce when they hit our site.
     
  • The retailer loved our product but we need better packaging before they’ll work with us.
     
  • We’re not able to raise the price-point because of low perceived value.
     
  • We sell really well at other retailers but our own site seems to drive away customers.
     
  • We want to move into the luxury market but our brand looks like it was made in our kitchen.
     
  • We have a good number of loyal customers but have trouble converting new customers.
     
  • We want to go international but the consultant said we have to improve our branding first.
     
  • The profit margin from selling on our own site is great but the site doesn’t convert well.
 

If any of these sound familiar, it might be time to invest in up-leveling your design.

Once have proven product, traction and a budget, it’s crucial to improve your designs ASAP. With growing, you’ll have increasing numbers of customers making first impressions of your brand and you want to make sure it’s a good one (I wrote a whole blog post on that over here). 

You’ll also start having more distribution opportunities and believe me, Sephora does not allow poorly designed packaging into their stores. There’s little worse than trying to redesign a brand while a major retailer is waiting. 

Great design also communicates value and allows you to target specific price points and markets. For instance, if you want to make the jump from masstige to prestige, you’ll want to take a second look at your design and make sure it conveys that value.

Finally good design builds trust which leads to a wide range of benefits from engagement on social media and email sign-ups to higher conversion rates.

I frequently talk with business owners and entrepreneurs who threw together quick DIY branding or website to get their concept off the ground, however find that it’s holding them back as they try to up-level their business.

If you feel like that’s you — let’s figure out how to up-level your brand and move your empire ahead.
 

Lego

by Magda Adamska @ BrandStruck

Category: Kids products – toys; Media & entertainment – theme parks Owner of the brand: The Lego Group Key competitors: Mega Bloks, Mattel, Hasbro

Artykuł Lego pochodzi z serwisu BrandStruck.

“If brands do decide to address gays, they don’t include lesbians”

by aufeminin @ Womenology

A meeting with Amandine Miguel, spokesperson for Inter LGBT, head of Lesbian Visibility What do you think of gay marketing (brands who particularly target the homosexual community)? Firstly, it is wrong to think that the “gay marketing” label includes all …

Continuer la lecture

The post “If brands do decide to address gays, they don’t include lesbians” appeared first on Womenology.

TFI Envision Selected by Baby Dove

by TFI Envision, Inc. @ TFI Envision, Inc.

Norwalk, CT — Baby Dove officially launched in the US in 2017. The collection of products spanning from bath bars to wipes marks the first new category from Dove since the brand debuted Dove Men+Care in 2010. Baby Dove is a range of baby care products born from the Dove brand’s 60 years of skin ...

Deliciously Ella on her ‘unusual’ approach to marketing

by Michael Barnett @ Marketing Week

Food writer and entrepreneur Ella Mills started Deliciously Ella back in 2012, and it has since grown into a multimillion pound brand. Here she shares the secrets to her success and the role marketing has played.

The post Deliciously Ella on her ‘unusual’ approach to marketing appeared first on Marketing Week.

If your brand is afraid of Amazon, then you should be terrified of Alibaba

by Graham Robertson @ Beloved Brands

Now begins the North American battle of Amazon vs Walmart, with the winner to take on Alibaba on the world’s retailer stage. I love watching the Kentucky Derby, especially those horses that start off slow, Read more…

The post If your brand is afraid of Amazon, then you should be terrified of Alibaba appeared first on Beloved Brands.

Burger King

by Magda Adamska @ BrandStruck

Category: Restaurants – fast food chains Owner of the brand: Burger King Holdings (owned by 3G Capital) Key competitors: McDonald’s, Wendy’s, KFC, Subway

Artykuł Burger King pochodzi z serwisu BrandStruck.

IBM

by Magda Adamska @ BrandStruck

Category: Electronics & technology – computers, software, communications equipment; Professional services – technological solutions, management consulting Owner of the brand: International Business Machines Corporation Key competitors: Google, Microsoft, Oracle, Accenture, Amazon

Artykuł IBM pochodzi z serwisu BrandStruck.

Budweiser

by Magda Adamska @ BrandStruck

Category: FMCG Alcoholic beverages – beer & cider Owner of the brand: Anheuser-Busch InBev Key competitors: Heineken, Coors, Miller, Carlsberg, Grolsch, Stella Artois, Fosters

Artykuł Budweiser pochodzi z serwisu BrandStruck.

Visa

by Magda Adamska @ BrandStruck

Category: Financial services – payment solutions Owner of the brand: Visa Inc. Key competitors: American Express, Mastercard, Discover, PayPal

Artykuł Visa pochodzi z serwisu BrandStruck.

Facebook’s Sheryl Sandberg: Digital is causing the collapse of the marketing funnel

by Sarah Vizard @ Marketing Week

Facebook’s chief operating officer suggests the growing importance of digital and mobile and the speed at which consumers can find information is causing a fundamental change in the way brands communicate.

The post Facebook’s Sheryl Sandberg: Digital is causing the collapse of the marketing funnel appeared first on Marketing Week.

Why do brands need media muses?

by aufeminin @ Womenology

“In reality, women are more ‘real,’ and not as perfect as Adriana Karembeu. People need reality, they need truth.” These are the words of Nicolas Chomette, head of Black & Gold, a design and strategy company. He adds, “Sometimes we …

Continuer la lecture

The post Why do brands need media muses? appeared first on Womenology.

Sorry Dove, empowerment isn’t a personal care product | Arwa Mahdawi

Sorry Dove, empowerment isn’t a personal care product | Arwa Mahdawi


the Guardian

The Choose Beautiful campaign’s promise to boost your self-esteem is cynical – it just wants you to choose Dove

Lyft

by Magda Adamska @ BrandStruck

Category: Travel & transportation – taxi companies; Sharing Economy Owner of the brand: Lyft, Inc. Key competitors: Uber, Sidecar, myTaxi

Artykuł Lyft pochodzi z serwisu BrandStruck.

Oracle

by Magda Adamska @ BrandStruck

Category: Electronics & technology – software, communications equipment; Professional services – technological solutions Owner of the brand: Oracle Corporation Key competitors: IBM, Microsoft, SAP, Amazon, Google, Salesforce,

Artykuł Oracle pochodzi z serwisu BrandStruck.

Twitter CEO promises overhaul of ‘clunky’ ad offering

by Sarah Vizard @ Marketing Week

Twitter's boss Jack Dorsey admits the platform hasn't done enough to differentiate its ad product or prove to advertisers that it works.

The post Twitter CEO promises overhaul of ‘clunky’ ad offering appeared first on Marketing Week.

If you want to do great work in Marketing, go work on a boring product. 

by Graham Robertson @ Beloved Brands

I started my career in kids cereals and every time I tried to do something interesting, I was told “No, we can’t do that” or my VP looked at me sideways like I was crazy. Read more…

The post If you want to do great work in Marketing, go work on a boring product.  appeared first on Beloved Brands.

M&M’s

by Magda Adamska @ BrandStruck

Category: FMCG Food – confectionery and chocolate, desserts & ice creams Owner of the brand: Mars, Inc. Key competitors: Reeses’s, Hershey’s, Smarties, KitKat, Cadbury

Artykuł M&M’s pochodzi z serwisu BrandStruck.

Sky

by Magda Adamska @ BrandStruck

Category: Media & entertainment – TV & Internet providers, TV channels, streaming services; Telecommunications Owner of the brand: Sky plc Key competitors: Virgin Media, BT, BBC, Channel 4, Netflix

Artykuł Sky pochodzi z serwisu BrandStruck.

Knorr

by Magda Adamska @ BrandStruck

Category: FMCG Food – Soups, sauces & seasonings Owner of the brand: Unilever Key competitors: Campbell’s, Maggi, Heinz

Artykuł Knorr pochodzi z serwisu BrandStruck.

Uber

by Magda Adamska @ BrandStruck

Category: Travel & transportation – taxi companies; Sharing Economy Owner of the brand: Uber Technologies, Inc. Key competitors: Lyft, Sidecar, myTaxi

Artykuł Uber pochodzi z serwisu BrandStruck.

Jim Beam

by Magda Adamska @ BrandStruck

Category: FMCG Alcoholic beverages – whisky, whiskey & bourbon, alcopops Owner of the brand: Beam Suntory Key competitors: Jack Daniel’s, Johnnie Walker, Chivas Regal, Ballantine’s, Jameson, Grant’s

Artykuł Jim Beam pochodzi z serwisu BrandStruck.

Burberry

by Magda Adamska @ BrandStruck

Category: Apparel – luxury apparel, FMCG Personal care & beauty – fragrances, make-up; Retail – fashion stores, e-retail Owner of the brand: Burberry Group plc Key competitors: Louis Vuitton, Hermès, Gucci, Prada, Ralph Lauren

Artykuł Burberry pochodzi z serwisu BrandStruck.

PlayStation

by Magda Adamska @ BrandStruck

Category: Electronics & technology – video game consoles; Media & entertainment – games, streaming services Owner of the brand: Sony Corporation Key competitors: Xbox, Nintendo

Artykuł PlayStation pochodzi z serwisu BrandStruck.

Dove Purely Pampering Body Cream with Shea Butter & Warm Vanilla (300ml)
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Dove Antiperspirant Spray Deodorant For Women 150 ml ( Pack of 10 ) + Our Travel Size Perfume
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Dove Antiperspirant Deodorant Silk Dry, 48 Hr., 150 ML (Pack of 6)
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Dove Body Wash, Deep Moisture Pump, 34 Ounce, (Pack of 2)
$26.59
Dove Silky Nourishment Body Cream 10.1 oz
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Dove Purely Pampering Body Wash, Pistachio Cream with Magnolia, 16.9 Ounce / 500 Ml (Pack of 3)
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Improved Formulation Go Fresh Dove Anti-Perspirant Deodorant Spray Grapefruit & lemongrass Scent (6 Can)
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Dove Men + Care Face Lotion Hydrate + 1.69 OZ - Buy Packs and SAVE (Pack of 3)
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Dove Purely Pampering Body Wash, Shea Butter with Warm Vanilla, 16.9 Ounce / 500 Ml (Pack of 3)
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Dove Men + Care Clean Comfort Spray Deodorant & Anti-Perspirant 150ML / 5.07 Oz,(6 Pack)
$16.10
Dove Invisible Solid Deodorant, Original Clean - 2.6 oz - 3 pk
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3 Pk. Dove Gentle Exfoliating Body Wash with Nutrium Moisture 16.9 Oz
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Dove Original Anti-Perspirant Deodorant 48h Spray 150 ml / 5 fl oz (6-Pack)
$15.99
Dove Go Fresh Anti-Perspirant Deodorant Spray 150ml Grapefruit & lemongrass Scent (1 Can)
$5.76
Dove Daily Moisture Shampoo and Conditioner 12oz Combo SET **Package May Vary**
$13.48
Dove Go Fresh Cool Moisture Fresh Touch Body Wash Cucumber and Green Tea 16.9 Oz / 500 Ml (Pack of 3)
$14.28
Dove Anti-Perspirant Deodorant, Sensitive Skin 2.60 oz
$7.99
Dove Men Plus Care Body Wash, Deep Clean, 13.5 Ounce (Pack of 3)
$22.33
Dove Beauty Cream Bar Soap, Go Fresh Revive, 100 G / 3.5 Oz Bars (Pack of 12)
$14.65
Dove Men+Care Deodorant Stick Clean Comfort 3 oz(Pack of 3)
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Dove Go Fresh Pomegranate & Lemon Verbena Deodorant Spray 150 ml / 5 oz (6-Pack)
$18.06
Dove Go Fresh Body Wash, Revitalize, Mandarin & Tiare Flower Scent, 16.9 Ounce / 500 Ml (Pack of 3)
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Dove Weightless Moisturizers Smooth and Soft Anti-Frizz Cream, 4 Ounce (113g)
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Dove Clinical Protection Antiperspirant Deodorant, Original Clean, 1.7 Oz (Pack of 3)
$21.98
Dove Clinical Protection Antiperspirant Deodorant, Cool Essentials 1.7 Ounce, (Pack of 2)
$14.49
6 Pack Dove Cotton Dry Anti-Perspirant Deodorant Spray 48 Hour Protection 150 Ml
$17.06
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$18.40
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$14.99
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$19.52
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$19.99
Dove Advanced Care Anti-Perspirant Deodorant, Revive 2.6 Oz (Pack of 3)
$16.48
DVO2979401 - Moisturizing Gentle Hand Cleaner
$122.28
Dove Original Spray Deodorant Anti Perspirant 150 Ml 5.07oz (Pack of 3)
$11.00
Dove Men+Care Antiperspirant Deodorant, Sensitive Shield, 2.7 Ounce (Pack of 4)
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$14.99
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$10.59
Dove Go Fresh Cucumber & Green Tea Deodorant 48h Spray 150 ml / 5 fl oz (6-Pack)
$16.49
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$12.46
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$23.99
Dove Invisible Dry Anti White Marks Antiperspirant Deodorant, 150 Ml / 5 Oz (Pack of 6)
$17.50
Dove Winter Care Beauty Bars - 14/4oz
$28.95
Dove Men + Care Dry Spray Antiperspirant, Clean Comfort (Pack of 4)
$15.83
Dove® Beauty Bath Shower Gel Indulging Cream 16.9 Oz / 500 Ml
$7.77
Dove Men + Care Body + Face Bars Aqua Impact - 6 ct
$12.82
Dove Go Fresh Cool Moisture Body Wash, Cucumber and Green Tea Pump 34 Ounce (Pack of 2)
3 Dove Nourishing and Restore Body Wash 500ml/19.9oz (3X 500ml/16.9oz, Purely pampering-Almond cream with hibiscus)
$17.99
Dove Advanced Care Deodorants, Cool Essentials (2.6 oz., 3 pk.)
$16.87
Dove Nutritive Solutions Daily Moisture, Shampoo and Conditioner Duo Set, 40 Ounce Pump Bottles
$24.90
Dove Men + Care Body & Face Wash, Sensitive Shield 13.50 oz (Pack of 3)
$20.70
Dove Go Fresh Revive Anti-Perspirant Deodorant Stick for Unisex, 2.6 Ounce
$6.69
Dove Men + Care Extra Fresh Non-irritant Antiperspiration 5 Pack
$24.99
Dove Invisible Dry Anti White Marks Anti-Perspirant Deoderant
$5.12
(Duo Set) Dove Damage Therapy Intensive Repair, Shampoo & Conditioner, 12 Oz. bottles
$13.19
Dove Men+Care Body and Face Wash, Clean Comfort 18 oz
Dove Damage Therapy Daily Moisture Shampoo, 2.8 Pound
$14.99
Dove Men Care Non-Irritant Antiperspirant Deodorant, Extra Fresh - 2.7 Ounce (5 in Pack)
$22.47
Dove Nutritive Therapy, Nourishing Oil Care, DUO Set Shampoo + Conditioner, 12 Ounce, 1 Each
$12.98
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$12.65
Dove Beauty Bar, Pink 4 oz, 14 Bar
$17.99
Dove Original Beauty Cream Bar White Soap 100 G / 3.5 Oz Bars (Pack of 12) by Dove
$16.99
Dove Shave Gel Sensitive 7 oz. (Pack of 3)
$17.26
Dove Cotton Soft Anti-Perspirant Deodorant Spray Dry 48 Hour Protection (Pack of 6) 150 Ml by Dove
$20.98
Dove Clinical Protection Anti-Perspirant Deodorant Solid, Revive 1.70 oz(Pack of 2)
$13.48
Dove Shampoo, Dryness & Itch Relief 12 oz
$5.59
Dove Body Wash Deep Moisture 24 oz, Pack of 3
$15.16
Dove Purely Pampering Body Wash, Coconut Milk (24 fl. oz., 3 pk.)
$24.09
Dove go sleeveless Antiperspirant, Beauty Finish 2.6 oz, 2 Pack
$4.99
Dove Beauty Bar, White 4 oz, 2 Bar
Dove Men + Care Revitalize Face Cream Lotion 1.69oz (Quantity 1)
$4.97
Dove Oxygen Moisture Shampoo and Conditioner Set 12 Ounce
$13.85
Sensitive Skin Unscented Moisturizing Cream Beauty Bar By Dove, 12 Count 4 Oz Each
$19.99
Dove Beauty Bar, Sensitive Skin 4 oz, 6 bar
$12.99
Dove Regenerative Nourishment Shampoo and Conditioner Set, 8.45 FL OZ each
$15.99
Dove Purely Pampering Shea Butter Beauty Bar with Vanilla Scent Soap 3.5 Oz / 100 Gr (Pack of 12 Bars)
$17.48
Dove Antiperspirant Deodorant, Powder 2.6 Ounce, (Pack of 6)
$21.36
Dove Body Wash Deep Moisture 24 oz, Pack of 3
$15.16
6 Cans of Dove Men+Care Invisible Dry 150ml Anti-Perspirant Anti-Transpirant Spray
$18.72
Dove Clinical Protection Antiperspirant Deodorant, Cool Essentials 1.7 oz
$7.72
Dove Sensitive Skin Nourishing Body Wash, 12 Ounce (2 Pack)
$19.33
Dove Men+Care Body Wash, Extra Fresh 23.5 Ounce (Pack of 2)
$20.45
Dove Men + Care Face Wash, Hydrate, 5 Oz (Pack of 3)
$18.40
Dove Men+Care Body Wash, Extra Fresh 13.5 oz, Twin Pack
$16.99
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Dove Dry Shampoo Refresh and Care Volume and Fullness, 5 Ounces, 3 Pack
$16.80
Dove Men+Care 2 in 1 Shampoo and Conditioner, Fresh and Clean 25.4 oz
Dove Sensitive Skin Unscented Hypo-Allergenic Beauty Bar 4 oz, 2 ea (Pack of 2)
$11.14
Dove Men + Care Body & Face Wash, Clean Comfort 13.50 oz ( Pack of 3)
$16.10
Dove Men + Care Fortfying Shampoo+conditioner 2 in 1 32fl Oz
$16.05
Dove Go Fresh Cucumber & Green Tea Scent, Antiperspirant & Deodorant Stick, 1.4 Oz / 40 Ml (Pack of 4)
$9.98
Dove Body Wash, Sensitive Skin Pump, 34 Ounce (Pack of 2)
$27.33
Dove Body Lotion, Cream Oil Intensive, 13.5 Ounce (Pack of 3)
$23.49
Dove Damage Therapy Cool Moisture Shampoo (12 oz) and Conditioner (12 oz)
$11.99
Dove Go Fresh Antiperspirant & Deodorant, Cool Essentials - 2.6 oz - 2 pk
$12.99
Dove Go Fresh Antiperspirant Deodorant, Restore, 2.6 Ounce (Pack of 2)
$9.11
Dove Men+Care Body and Face Bar, Deep Clean 4 oz, 6 Bar
$9.39
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