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Dove Evolution Commercial

Teaching Feminism and Body Image: What is Dove Really Selling?

Teaching Feminism and Body Image: What is Dove Really Selling?


Small Strokes Big Oaks

Yesterday, during a lesson on persuasive rhetorical techniques, I showed my students a number of commercials, asking them whether the technique used was Logos, Ethos, or Pathos.  Along with this, I…

This Commercial Shows Us Why We Can’t Let The Beauty Industry Shape Our Children

This Commercial Shows Us Why We Can’t Let The Beauty Industry Shape Our Children


Collective Evolution

In 2006 the food, beverage, cleaning agent and personal care product manufacturer Unilever launched a campaign designed to help build and promote the Dove Self-Esteem Fund. As part of the ‘Dove Campaign for Real Beauty’ several commercials were made and released, all of which managed to press certain boundaries in our mainstream understanding of beauty. […]

Dove | BrandStruck: Brand strategy database

Dove | BrandStruck: Brand strategy database


BrandStruck

Category: FMCG Personal care & beauty – hair care, body care, deodorants Owner of the brand: Unilever Key competitors: L’Oréal, Garnier, Nivea, Olay, Avon

How Dove's 'Real Beauty Sketches' Became The Most Viral Video Ad Of All Time

How Dove's 'Real Beauty Sketches' Became The Most Viral Video Ad Of All Time


Business Insider

Details on the media plan behind it.

Remembering the Mexican Revolution with Aunt Julia

by Matt Thompson @ Savage Minds

Growing up in Austin, Texas, Diez y Seis — Mexican Independence Day — always seemed to hold an official, albeit minor, status in the state capitol. This was not a holiday that we observed in my family in any formal capacity. Much like Cinco de Mayo we might find ourselves at a Mexican restaurant that … Continue reading Remembering the Mexican Revolution with Aunt Julia

Dove

Dove


Unilever UK & Ireland

Making a genuine difference

The Problem with Dove | THE ILLUSIONISTS

The Problem with Dove | THE ILLUSIONISTS


THE ILLUSIONISTS - a documentary about body image and globalization

The dark side of Dove's Real Beauty Campaign: from its controversial parent company, to the marketing of Dove skin whitening deodorants in India...

The Asian Dove That Ate Europe Alive

The Asian Dove That Ate Europe Alive


Scientific American Blog Network

The story behind one of Europe's most familiar columbiforms...

Media Literacy and Body Confidence: Is One Lesson Enough? - Adios Barbie

Media Literacy and Body Confidence: Is One Lesson Enough? - Adios Barbie


Adios Barbie

By Valerie Martin This past year, as part of my graduate social work internship I conducted student counseling in a local high school, both one-on-one and in groups. For my…

Dove Evolution in Campaign For Real Beauty - The Inspiration Room

Dove Evolution in Campaign For Real Beauty - The Inspiration Room


The Inspiration Room

Dove’s Campaign for Real Beauty has gone viral this month with the launch of “Evolution”, a 60 second journey from real beauty to retouched glamour. The Evolution TV ad is appearing on YouTube, MySpace and Google Video, topping viral popularity on lists such as The Viral Chart. The Dove Evolution spot opens with a woman …

Dove

Dove


Unilever global company website

Dove is committed to helping women realise their personal potential for beauty by engaging them with products that deliver real care.

Dove: the perfect success story in advertising

by aufeminin @ Womenology

In 2004 Dove launched a ground breaking worldwide advertising campaign in the beauty industry. The brand created a new way to address their public which aimed to be “real” by getting rid of the complexes that beauty product consumers suffer from. …

Continuer la lecture

The post Dove: the perfect success story in advertising appeared first on Womenology.

Watch Media Distort Our Perception Of Beauty As Seen In Dove Evolution

Watch Media Distort Our Perception Of Beauty As Seen In Dove Evolution


Deep Roots at Home

Is it possible that marketing and media purposefully deceive us? The apparent fit we see on the mannequins isn’t really how the clothing is made at all.

Dove "Evolution" commercial what program is that?

Dove "Evolution" commercial what program is that?


Photo.net Photography Forums

What program are they using to do the editing? It looks and feels likePhotoshop... But it is not... So does anyone know? Is it a real post pro...

Dove - Evolution Commercial (higher quality)

Dove - Evolution Commercial (higher quality)


TED-Ed

Body Image Statistics  

Real Beauty? Measuring the Dove Marketing Program's Success

Real Beauty? Measuring the Dove Marketing Program's Success


EnergizeGrowth

More than 10 years after its debut, the Dove Real Beauty program remains a marketing icon and a source of controversy. What did it accomplish?

Dove Ideology

Dove Ideology


Savage Minds

The latest Dove advertising campaign, “Real Beauty Sketches,” has already garnered its share of well-deserved criticism: That “Dove is owned by Unilever – the same company that owns Axe, king of mi…

Women in music videos: press pause on female stereotypes

Women in music videos: press pause on female stereotypes


Dove US

Help your child challenge the “perfect” body shape and stereotypes of women they see in music videos—and boost their body confidence in the process.

Squarespace Calling John Malkovich

by Duncan Macleod @ The Inspiration Room

Squarespace commercial “Calling John Malkovich” is one of the nominations for Most Outstanding Commercial at this year’s Emmy Awards. The Super Bowl commercial is a continuation of the Squarespace campaign in which John Malkovich sets out to establish an online fashion design business. Things get tricky when he discovers that a namesake has already got […]

10 Years After Dove's 'Real Beauty' Campaign, More Brands Fight for Real Women

10 Years After Dove's 'Real Beauty' Campaign, More Brands Fight for Real Women


TakePart

It's been 10 years since Dove launched its “Campaign for Real Beauty”—a stark series of ads that were radical and simple in equal measure—featuring lovely, normal-sized women who didn’t need Photoshop to look radiant. The ads, which ran in 2004 and 2005, lacked any screed about the pressures that come with being a woman in a visual culture that’s awash in creatively lit, digitally manipulated images of dangerously thin models. The folks behind the campaign simply let us feel our own shock at seeing women with normal curves and natural faces being celebrated for their beauty in a national advertisement. Dove didn't stop there. The soap maker added rocket fuel to the conversation in 2006, when its time-lapse "Evolution" video went viral. The movement to expose marketers' use of trickery to convince us that we're failing if we don't have flawless skin and breathtaking bodies was here to stay. Significant progress has been made since Dove's campaign: The American public, the blogosphere, and the Twitterverse now routinely call out magazine publishers and marketers for digitally altering images of girls and women to shrink their bodies, smooth their faces, and otherwise morph them to fit an unrealistic, narrow ideal of beauty. The pace is quickening. In just the past few months, there's been even more progress and a few moments that drove the dialogue forward. 1. The more bare skin a campaign flaunts, the more Photoshop it typically gets. But American Eagle says its new campaign for the Aerie line of lingerie will not use any altered images of models. Instead, “real” girls and women can upload unretouched photos of themselves to a photo gallery. Sure, it’s pretty screwed up that selling underwear using real photos of gorgeous, skinny young girls (instead of digitally improved gorgeous, skinny young girls) is seen as groundbreaking. But moving away from the idealized versions of women who don't exist is a footstep Dove took, and the clothier is now following its lead. “It’s great that we’re beginning to break that down,” said Heather Arnet, executive director of the Women & Girls Foundation, of the fakeries that line the glossies. 2. Forever Yours Lingerie didn't stop working with model Elly Mayday when she was diagnosed with ovarian cancer last year. It featured beautiful shots of her with surgical scars unhidden and no wig or digital fakery to hide the baldness that resulted from her cancer treatment. Rather than looking like something’s missing, Mayday’s baldness comes across as strong and sexy. It’s empowering for the rest of us to see a woman outside the beauty mold we’ve been sold for so long—and to find ourselves aspiring to emulate her sexy confidence and appeal. (Forever Yours also gets points for raising money toward Mayday’s medical expenses.) 3. A new time-lapse video released by Hungarian pop star Boggie shows her singing a pop song called “Nouveau Parfum” while being Photoshopped, a fresh take on Dove's "Evolution" that's amplified by the resigned expression on her face. As the song unfolds, pieces of her disappear and are overwritten: Boggie’s eyes, like everyone else’s, aren’t exactly symmetrical. So one is deleted, then replaced by an exact copy of the other. Not a single square inch of her face or hair is left untouched. 4. Earlier last month during the Golden Globes, actor Diane Keaton took the stage to honor Woody Allen, her tousled hair and menswear-chic outfit reminding us of the trend she set when Annie Hall hit theaters in 1977. It was also clear on high-definition screens across America that at 68, she's got (oh, the horror!) lots of lines on her gorgeous face. When her speech ended, the network cut to a commercial break featuring Keaton selling L'Oréal cosmetics without a line on her digitally enhanced face, seemingly sporting the skin of a 25-year-old. Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook quickly lit up with scorn. That social media response is valuable, Arnet says, because younger women and girls are active on Instagram and Twitter and are participating in those conversations. 5. Former Cosmopolitan editor Leah Hardy drew attention for admitting that during her tenure the magazine routinely Photoshopped out the protruding bones of super skinny models to keep readers from seeing how emaciated the models really were. Since that admission surfaced, before-and-after comparisons of bone-thin models and their healthier-looking altered images have been popping up around the Web. Apparently the world’s top fashion magazines, despite the huge budgets at their disposal, cannot find a single woman on the planet who isn’t either too thin or too fat for their liking. It’s further reinforcement of the conclusion we’d love to share with every tween girl who’s just beginning to notice her appearance: The elusive “perfection” that every cosmetic company and clothing retailer is trying to sell you does not exist. 6. Mindy Kaling might not have minded, but many other people did: When Elle magazine published covers for its February 2014 issue featuring Kaling, readers and pundits immediately questioned why Kaling's cover was a black-and-white close-up rather than the full-color, full-body shots of the other (skinnier and more "conventionally" beautiful) actors. That's the key: We've begun to make a habit of questioning how women are depicted and what tools are being used to change or edit their appearance for public consumption. Yes, the visual landscape is still awash with altered images, surgically altered models, and the pressure to be thinner, younger, and closer to the narrow beauty ideal that so much marketing pushes on us. Marketers aren’t going to stop selling us

Over Competitive Parent...Oh No!

by noreply@blogger.com (Michelle) @ Michelle's Media Blog

I believe that in any child or athlete’s life they will always have as their number one fans their family or friends, but nothing is worse than an over competitive parent. A parent who is very competitive is very hard to deal with and often embarrassing. Have you ever seen any type of child competing in a particular sport and have their wild parent giving pep talks, yelling, or even going as far as holding up cheesy signs. Well these are all symptoms are of an over bearing competitive parent. Media is one of the main causes for an over competitive parent in my eyes. Media constructs the message that to be successful, you have to be a winner. This means winning in every aspect of your life. We all know that clearly this is not always possibly, usually there is always someone who is better then you, but just giving it your all is always worth it. Media puts it in our heads that the only people who will ever get anywhere in life are the ones who constantly win. The media implies that not only will winning help us succeed, but it will improve our reputation and status in life. This is not always true, just because you win something does not mean that you will be a better person. Sadly, this is what many parents believe which leads them to become over competitive. Often they will push their kids past their limits doing anything possible to win. Not only is this unhealthy, but downright mean. No parent should be forcing their child to win by bribery or threats or just plain pressure. Children are too young for this and should be competing to compete against themselves, and not always against others. Many interpret these messages from the media in different ways. When some people see an Olympic medalist, they admire the hard work the athlete must have put in and all of their dedication. Others may be very jealous and do anything in their pathway to get themselves, or their child to become such an amazing athlete as they see in the athletes competing in the Olympics. Often if a parent was not successful in their childhood they will also put more pressure onto their child so they can “relive their dreams”. Most likely, it was the media which put the idea of wanting to be a successful child into their head. Usually in all of the hit TV shows when children compete in anything, they always come out on top and are now the most popular and are able to have such large bragging rights. Which parent does not want their child to be liked by others, so why not force your child to be a winner? Often, media messages such as commercials for winning athletes are produced to sell a product which are endorsed the athlete. By having a winning athlete in the picture, we are made to think that it is such a huge part of how the athlete won, and if we use such a product we will come out on top just like the athlete did. If parents see a commercial for a specific energy drink or protein bar which is endorsed by a gold medal athlete, why would they not purchase this product for their child to consume? Their belief is its only food; it can’t hurt them, so why not see if it will improve my child! Many parents see this as a gateway to help their child win. Some parents take matters into their own hands and the situation goes way out of control. Also I believe that having TV shows where their child can be in the spotlight such as TLC’S “toddlers in Tiaras” is not a positive way to show a child being successful. In this show we continually see the child’s parents trying to coach their 5 year old child into becoming a beauty queen, rather than a child expressing their own wishes to become one. Every “Pageant Mom” seems crazy, and will do anything to make their child win. The mother gets the child ready for hours, practice routines with them, and even does the routine themselves while out in the audience incase their child forgets. This gets over the top very easily especially considering there are so many parents who want their child to win. Not only do they want them to win, they want them to get the top over all grand prize, or the mother is disappointed. At the end the show you see reality TV to the extreme because the show concentrates on televising just the crazy pageant moms fighting with each other over who’s child should have won and how the judging was based. This all relates back to us and the media. We as humans love to watch reality shows. We love to see others in difficult situations and we enjoy being able to point out other’s flaws. When we are able to see others in an argument, it almost makes us forget about what a bad day we have had and focus on them. It takes our mind off our loves and puts us in another world where we as the viewers can just watch in other people’s drama without having to partake in it. Competitive parents are just another shot of reality TV for us.

Here is an article to show you not only if you have but if you are a over competitive parent! http://www.jobeaufoix.com/2010/03/04/competitive-parents-are-you-one/

Do you really want this person to be you ? I don't think so...

The Rock x Siri Dominate the Day

by Duncan Macleod @ The Inspiration Room

Apple is promoting the latest Siri features with a commercial featuring The Rock, Dwayne Johnson. The commercial, “The Rock x Siri Dominate the Day”, has the actor, producer and professional wrestler using Siri to tick off items on his life long bucket list. In a whirlwind of activity he uses Siri’s connection with FaceTime, email, […]

"Real Beauty" or Real Marketing?

by noreply@blogger.com (Mariah's Blog) @ Campaign Analysis Blog

     For many years, women and young girls have dealt with self-esteem issues, especially in the last few decades.  Dove, the skin and beauty product company, has had an ongoing campaign entitled Campaign For Real Beauty, which they have been promoting since 2004.  According to Dove, the mission of the campaign has been "to make people feel more beautiful every day by challenging today's stereotypical view of beauty."  Since the campaign started, Dove has received an immense amount of press and recognition- more than they ever have before.  Therefore, I cannot help but wonder, are they promoting “Real Beauty” or Real Marketing?  Unfortunately, although Dove claims to want to promote real beauty, they are in fact simply trying to increase revenue.  The societal norms of women on billboards and in magazines are sized-zero, loaded with make-up and digitally altered to have them appear what society would define as beautiful.  The company, however, has gone against the societal norm and claimed that real beauty is defined as women who are sized-twelve and natural- all to gain the media’s attention.  Unfortunately, the sad truth of this fact is that Dove still promotes beauty as society has viewed it, still use the societal norm of beautiful women, used the Real Beauty campaign to gain revenue and increase the value of their company, and use digital enhancement to alter the looks of their “naturally beautiful women” in their advertisements.
     When society promotes beautiful hair, we are shown volumized, long, sleek and shiny.  This is the exact advertising technique of Dove, as well.  For example, during the Real Beauty campaign, the classic character of Betty Flintsone was used in a Dove hair advertisement promoting more volumized and beautiful hair.  The advertisement features the Betty Flintstone we naturally see- her already beautiful natural red hair in a bun.  However, Dove is exploiting that her hair is not beautiful enough, and that she needs their product to make her hair beautiful.  As society would see beautiful hair, it is not in a bun, but rather it is let down and is long, sleek, shiny and with great volume.  Next to the typical Betty we’ve always known is a "new" Betty featured with long, shiny hair, and this is exactly what Dove is promoting in this print advertisement.  At the bottom of the ad, it reads, “Talk about yabba dabba do,” stating that her hair was not beautiful enough to begin with.  The same concept applies to Dove’s hair advertisement featuring Marge Simpson.  The ad displays the classic Marge we typically see- with tall, curly and frizzy hair.  The expression on her face is concerned as she looks at her hair.  After she uses the anti-frizz cream product by Dove, Marge is shown happier and as having societal beauty- hair down, long, shiny, sleek, and frizz-free.  Therefore, just as with the Betty Flintstone ad, Dove is promoting that Marge Simpson needs their product in order for her to have what society would view as beautiful hair.  Consequently, as shown with the Betty Flintstone and Marge Simpson ads, although Dove wants to go against society and promote natural beauty, they are falling short of their word and actually being hypocritical with their advertisements.
     Not only is Dove falling into the trap of promoting societal beauty with the Betty Flintstone and Marge Simpson ads, but also in other advertisements, as well.  During their infamous Campaign for Real Beauty, Dove released a coupon for their Energy Glow Beauty Body Lotion featuring four different women in bras and underwear.  The tagline of the ad states, “Good for your skin. Great for your look.”  Here Dove is implying your body needs to be better and visually appealing to look at, which is not the idea they claim to promote.  As viewed in recent billboards and print ads, Dove has promoted for their campaign that the most beautiful of women are a size twelve and have flab.  However, once again, they are being hypocritical in their Energy Glow Beauty Body Lotion because here, all four women are in perfect shape.  One woman in particular, on the right of the advertisement, is actually what society would most likely view as the most beautiful woman in ad, and she is in tip-top shape displaying a wonderful-looking muscular structure on her abs.  You would expect to see her on the cover of Women’s Fitness- not on a Dove coupon.  I thought Dove wanted to promote natural, average-sized women.  This woman with her Ab Circle Pro abs is completely going against Dove’s original statement of “Real Beauty.”  Once again, Dove cannot stay away from society’s view of beautiful women, as they continue to use them in their advertisements.
     On top of developing useful products, every company must have a good marketing strategy or else people will not know their name, and their products will not sell.  Especially in an economic recession, companies need to think up more strategic ways of promoting their products, and Dove has done just this.  The basis behind their Campaign for Real Beauty is not to promote what they are claiming as real beauty, but to increase sales.  According to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, the average weight of the American woman above the age of twenty is just shy of one hundred sixty-five pounds.  Therefore, promoting women who are one hundred sixty-five pounds does wonders for their marketing plan.  If I were a two hundred pound woman, I would not be sucked in to the advertisements displaying a stick-figured mere one hundred and ten pound woman; I would want to see women just like me.  This was Dove’s plan all along.  Since the average size of women is growing, so do the women in their advertisements.  Ergo, the ads are more likely to appeal to more women, therefore increasing sales.  I will admit Dove was extremely clever in coming up with such a strategy.  After all, that’s what people are paid millions of dollars to do.  It was a well played out approach in the marketing scheme of things because after the Campaign for Real Beauty launched, Dove’s products flew off the shelves.  So when it comes down to it, Dove will only promote better self-esteem for women so long as their company does well and their marketing design continues to work as it has been for the past six years.
     In addition to still promoting society’s view of beautiful women in their advertisements, Dove has also digitally enhanced their own models in the Real Beauty campaign.  In a commercial Dove created entitled, “Evolution,” we see a woman who has acne, beauty marks and pale skin.  The commercial takes us on a journey through her day, as she is getting ready for a photo shoot.  The woman sits in a chair as she has multiple make-up artists cover her pimples, sunspots and blemishes.  They then continue to pile on all sorts of make-up onto her cheeks, forehead, nose, chin, and eyes- the whole nine yards.  She then has hair stylists curling and perfecting her hair.  At this point, the woman already looks like an entirely different person.  They continue on with the photo shoot, snapping multiple pictures of her.  Once she is finished, they load the photographs onto the computer and continue to alter her appearance furthermore.  They lengthen her neck, make her eyes fuller, move around her hair and much more.  The final product is the image they take and put onto a billboard promoting face foundation.  The tagline of the commercial states, “No wonder girl’s image of beauty is so distorted.”  Dove is expressing in this commercial that it’s no wonder women’s image of beauty is misconstrued; most companies take their advertisements and alter them in such a way that the model appears absolutely “perfect,” as if they looked this way naturally.  The point Dove was trying to get across with this commercial was that it is not “Real Beauty” when you have to digitally alter people in advertisements.  Oh wait- didn’t Dove then continue to digitally manipulate their own advertisements featured in the Campaign for Real Beauty?  According to the May 12, 2008 issue of The New Yorker, photos featured in the campaign- such as one of the originals displaying six different-sized “natural” women- were in fact unnatural, and the photos were digitally altered.  Pascal Dangin, a digital artist, is best known for his work for digitally touching up models in Vogue magazine and for the worldwide known company Dior.  Dangin then touched up the advertisement for Dove featuring the six women.  He stated, "Do you know how much retouching was done on that? But it was great to do, a challenge, to keep everyone's skin and faces showing the milage but not looking unattractive."  Dove wanted the women to look natural, but at the same time not show any stretch marks or cellulite.  According to the Health Guide Organization, over ninety percent of women have cellulite, so why would Dove, the company promoting Real Beauty, cover up such flaws in their own advertisements?  This is because cellulite is simply unappealing, and as Dangin mentioned, Dove did not want the women to appear unattractive.  This is yet another marketing strategy used to promote their company and products.  Once again, Dove proves to be hypocritical in their reasoning behind the promotion of their Campaign for Real Beauty.
     Dove’s purpose of creating the Campaign for Real Beauty was not to promote women’s self-esteem and what true beauty should be, but rather to devise a unique marketing plan to promote their company and appeal to a larger (no pun intended) audience.  Although Dove’s mission was to explain that what society tells us true beauty is, is in fact fake, they still promote models and tactics supporting society’s view of beauty.  In addition, while exploiting companies using digital enhancement to distort the image of what true beauty should be, Dove continues to digitally manipulate their own advertisements to appeal to the viewer, as well.  Although Dove did a phenomenal job in their marking strategies to appeal to a more vast audience, they consistently fail to follow through with their mission to promote “Real Beauty” and damage the idealized societal view of what beauty truly means.

Can disclaimer labels or Dove Evolution commercial mitigate negative effects of thin-ideal exposure?

Can disclaimer labels or Dove Evolution commercial mitigate negative effects of thin-ideal exposure?


ResearchGate

Official Full-Text Paper (PDF): Can disclaimer labels or Dove Evolution commercial mitigate negative effects of thin-ideal exposure?

Dove Evolution Commercial

Dove Evolution Commercial


@TheSocyCinema

Tags: gender , bodies ,  media , ideal beauty, image, representation, sexism, self esteem, 0 0 to 05 mins Year: 2006 Length: 1:15 Access: YouTube Summary: The caption under this clip reads,...

The Inconvenient Truth Behind Dove, The Love-Your-Body Beauty Company

The Inconvenient Truth Behind Dove, The Love-Your-Body Beauty Company


Jezebel

Yesterday, when we presented the new Dove commerical, Onslaught, we neglected to mention a few things. Luckily, blogs Feministing and Feministe reminded us of a few facts! For starters, while Dove can be applauded for examining the damaging effects of the beauty industry, its parent company, Unilever, is a major manufacturer of skin-lightening creams marketed in India. (Because, you know, the lighter your skin, the more beautiful you are.) In addition, Unilever makes Axe body spray, whose sexist and just plain stupid ad campaigns and "humilidating" show don't exactly send the message that the Onslaught spot does. And there's more: Unilever spends $809 million on advertising: it markets Dove, which encourages women to love their bodies, Ben & Jerry's ice cream, in which you can drown your sorrows if you don't love your body, and Slim-Fast, to make your body thin enough to love.

Archetype Innocent: free to be you and me | The Big Story

Archetype Innocent: free to be you and me | The Big Story


The Big Story

Marketing a Innocent brand is understanding that people still have the yearning for honesty and beauty in this world. It's all about keeping hope alive.

Why retouching is a very personal topic

by noreply@blogger.com (Desi) @ RETOUCHING: THE GOOD, THE BAD AND THE UGLY


I was born and raised in Bulgaria. The city that I come from is relatively small. Growing up as a teenager in Bulgaria, I was not exposed to many teen or fashion magazines. Most of the magazines back then were expensive so my parents were not able to afford giving me money for magazines every single week. And to be honest there were not that many fashion magazines published in Bulgaria, back then.  The aftermath of communism still existed. I remember seeing once in the store a version of Italian Vogue. For some reason it was wrapped in plastics and I could not even take a look inside. Of course I have seen images of models and celebrities, mostly on TV though or in some newspapers.  In my free time I used to read a book, go biking or just hang out with friends.
In 2004, I decided to come to the United States and continue my education here. I was 18- years –old back then. I decided to come to New York because I have been always interested in different cultures. After all, New York is one of the most diverse cities in the world. And here I was…several months after graduating high school I was ready to face the challenges that the big city offers.
I was dazzled by the skyscrapers, the shiny stores and the fashion around me . It was all new to me and I wanted to explore it all.  I remember the first time that I went to Time Square … I fell in love with all the billboards depicting gorgeous models. Then I “discovered “the fashion magazines, and simply got obsessed. I was in love with Elle, Cosmopolitan, Marie Claire, but my favorite of them all was Vogue. I remember looking at the photos in these magazines for hours, admiring the gorgeous women depicted. I was buying a dream and most importantly wanted to be part of the dream. As a result I started being obsessed with the way I look. I was spending crazy amount of money on all different beauty products, personal trainer, and clothing. My goal was to achieve perfection. Unfortunately, this obsession had negative impact on my life. As a result I was not performing well in school and had to skip one semester. It also had a great impact on my relationships with men because I was always feeling insecure.
 Three years ago I started internship in a company specializing in retouching. I have heard about retouching before I started working in the institution but was not familiar how it works. I am very thankful that I had the opportunity to explore to what extend the images that we see in magazines are retouched. It was a wakeup call! I realized that I was missing my real self. I was trying to look like one of these women on the commercials without realizing that it is actually IMPOSIBLE. These women do not exist. 99.9 % of the images that we see are artificially created.  Magazines are selling a dream. It is good to look at the dream. However, do not try to be part of it because it is unhealthy and the image that you want to achieve is unattainable.

The evolution of Dove

The evolution of Dove


strategy

As Dove celebrates its 50th anniversary, strategy examines how the brand has evolved from a bar of soap to a global master brand. Along the way, we look at how messaging to women has also evolved over this pivotal period in women's history

Dove's True Colors: beautiful or bad? - AfterEllen

Dove's True Colors: beautiful or bad? - AfterEllen


AfterEllen

Here's the thing: I use Dove. I like Dove. I happen to think they make nice soap. And if they also happen to put out some nice television ads, well, all the better. But recently the brand and its Campaign for Real Beauty have come under fire by critics who have cried hypocrisy because Dove is owned by the same company that puts out, among many other things, Axe body spray. On the one hand, positive messages telling young girls about having good body image; on the other, sleazy messages telling young boys about bagging hot chicks. Oh, the conundrum. Dove’s latest ad, called “Onslaught,” is interesting for many reasons. In the clip, an adorable red-haired girl smiles innocently into the camera, only to be bombarded with a montage of images urging her to look “younger, smaller, lighter, firmer, tighter, thinner, softer.”

New Dove ad exposes 'beauty pressures' on girls

New Dove ad exposes 'beauty pressures' on girls


CTVNews

The Dove Campaign for Real Beauty has launched a new advertisement aimed at exposing the "beauty pressures" that bombard young girls.

Dove ad wins Cannes film prize

Dove ad wins Cannes film prize


the Guardian

A Dove ad won the top award in the film category at the Cannes Lions International Advertising Festival. By Mark Sweney.

We Are America – Love has no labels

by Duncan Macleod @ The Inspiration Room

The Ad Council’s “We Are America” commercial, part of the Love has no labels campaign, is one of the nominations for Most Outstanding Commercial at this year’s Emmy Awards. Launched for Independence Day 2016, the We Are America ad featured American professional wrestler, rapper, actor and reality television show host John Cena reflecting on patriotism […]

GE Meet Molly, the Kid Who Never Stops Inventing

by Duncan Macleod @ The Inspiration Room

GE has launched “Meet Molly, the Kid Who Never Stops Inventing”, a commercial celebrating the engineering solutions developed at GE. We’re introduced to Molly, a young girl who comes up with brilliant solutions to problems in the home, including taking out the trash, selling Girl Guide cookies, making her bed, sweeping the floor and mowing […]

Commentaires sur The most desired US brands by women … and men par Etude : les femmes et la technologie « Les News du planning

by Etude : les femmes et la technologie « Les News du planning @ Commentaires pour Womenology

[...] La plupart des marques des secteurs concernés n’ont pas perçu ce potentiel de consommation et ont délaissés les femmes dans leurs stratégies. À l’inverse, ceux qui comme Sony ont eu du flair se sont vus récompenser : avec des actions comme « Sony loves Women ! » ou la commercialisation d’une PSP Pink (première console portable conçue pour les femmes), le groupe nippon a réussi à devenir la 2e marque préférée des consommatrices américaines. [...]

Dove "Evolution" vs. Victoria's Secret

Dove "Evolution" vs. Victoria's Secret


These Are a Few of My Favorite Things

Victoria’s Secret and Dove, they have different views on body image. Two commercials are evaluated, Dove’s “Evolution” and VS’s Super Bowl 2015 commercial.

Photoshop Is A Girl’s Best FriendPart III Retouching the Portrait

by Cemal Ekin @ NECCC – Kept Light Photography

Let’s start by viewing a short video, all the way to the end. Click on the following link and watch the video before moving on to the section that follows. Dove – Evolution Commercial Objective Produce a pleasing photograph of the model that looks realistic and natural, also free from editing artifacts Tools to know […]

Dove's "Campaign for Real Beauty" Is the Campaign of 21st Century - Marketing magazin

Dove's "Campaign for Real Beauty" Is the Campaign of 21st Century - Marketing magazin


Marketing magazin

The iconic campaign was picked by every one of the Advertising Age judges as belonging on the list, and one that was described by the panel as “groundbreaking, brave, bold, insightful, transparent and authentic.” As Ad Age states, Dove began its campaign with a global survey in 2004 that found, among other things, that only 23 …

Volkswagen Humans Adapt

by Duncan Macleod @ The Inspiration Room

Volkswagen France is running “Humains”, a commercial promoting the brand’s environmental credentials. Earlier in the month the French government announced plans to phase out petrol and diesel powered vehicles by 2040. The Volkswagen Humans campaign responds with the promise of adaptation. People have always adapted to their environment, often without realising, whether it be eating […]

Dove Purely Pampering Body Cream with Shea Butter & Warm Vanilla (300ml)
$8.16
Dove Antiperspirant Spray Deodorant For Women 150 ml ( Pack of 10 ) + Our Travel Size Perfume
$32.99
Dove Antiperspirant Deodorant Silk Dry, 48 Hr., 150 ML (Pack of 6)
$16.49
Dove Body Wash, Deep Moisture Pump, 34 Ounce, (Pack of 2)
$26.59
Dove Silky Nourishment Body Cream 10.1 oz
$7.10
Dove Purely Pampering Body Wash, Pistachio Cream with Magnolia, 16.9 Ounce / 500 Ml (Pack of 3)
$17.48
Improved Formulation Go Fresh Dove Anti-Perspirant Deodorant Spray Grapefruit & lemongrass Scent (6 Can)
$16.50
Dove Men + Care Face Lotion Hydrate + 1.69 OZ - Buy Packs and SAVE (Pack of 3)
$19.50
Dove Purely Pampering Body Wash, Shea Butter with Warm Vanilla, 16.9 Ounce / 500 Ml (Pack of 3)
$12.99
Dove Men + Care Clean Comfort Spray Deodorant & Anti-Perspirant 150ML / 5.07 Oz,(6 Pack)
$16.10
Dove Invisible Solid Deodorant, Original Clean - 2.6 oz - 3 pk
$9.55
3 Pk. Dove Gentle Exfoliating Body Wash with Nutrium Moisture 16.9 Oz
$14.99
Dove go fresh Revive Antiperspirant/Deodorant, Pack of 4, 2.6 Oz each
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Dove Advanced Care Invisible Solid Antiperspirant deodorant 4ct(2.6oz x 4)
$11.74
Dove Men+Care Elements Antiperspirant Stick, Minerals + Sage 2.7 oz, 4 Count
$17.88
Dove Original Anti-Perspirant Deodorant 48h Spray 150 ml / 5 fl oz (6-Pack)
$15.99
Dove Go Fresh Anti-Perspirant Deodorant Spray 150ml Grapefruit & lemongrass Scent (1 Can)
$5.76
Dove Daily Moisture Shampoo and Conditioner 12oz Combo SET **Package May Vary**
$13.48
Dove Go Fresh Cool Moisture Fresh Touch Body Wash Cucumber and Green Tea 16.9 Oz / 500 Ml (Pack of 3)
$14.28
Dove Anti-Perspirant Deodorant, Sensitive Skin 2.60 oz
$7.99
Dove Men Plus Care Body Wash, Deep Clean, 13.5 Ounce (Pack of 3)
$22.33
Dove Beauty Cream Bar Soap, Go Fresh Revive, 100 G / 3.5 Oz Bars (Pack of 12)
$14.65
Dove Men+Care Deodorant Stick Clean Comfort 3 oz(Pack of 3)
$23.22
Dove Go Fresh Pomegranate & Lemon Verbena Deodorant Spray 150 ml / 5 oz (6-Pack)
$18.06
Dove Go Fresh Body Wash, Revitalize, Mandarin & Tiare Flower Scent, 16.9 Ounce / 500 Ml (Pack of 3)
$15.98
Dove Weightless Moisturizers Smooth and Soft Anti-Frizz Cream, 4 Ounce (113g)
$3.99
Dove Clinical Protection Antiperspirant Deodorant, Original Clean, 1.7 Oz (Pack of 3)
$21.98
Dove Clinical Protection Antiperspirant Deodorant, Cool Essentials 1.7 Ounce, (Pack of 2)
$14.49
6 Pack Dove Cotton Dry Anti-Perspirant Deodorant Spray 48 Hour Protection 150 Ml
$17.06
Dove Go Fresh Restore Beauty Bars, Blue Fig and Orange Blossom Scent, 4.75 Oz (Pack of 12)
$18.40
Dove Invs Sold Pwd Size 2.6z Dove Powder Invisible Solid Antiperspirant Deodorant
$10.46
Dove Men + Care Antiperspirant & Deodorant, Cool Silver 2.70 oz (Pack of 4)
$14.99
Dove Advanced Care Antiperspirant, Clear Finish 2.6 oz, 4 Count
$19.52
Dove Ultimate go fresh Cool Essentials Anti-perspirant/Deodorant, 2.6 Ounce (Pack of 4)
$19.99
Dove Advanced Care Anti-Perspirant Deodorant, Revive 2.6 Oz (Pack of 3)
$16.48
DVO2979401 - Moisturizing Gentle Hand Cleaner
$122.28
Dove Original Spray Deodorant Anti Perspirant 150 Ml 5.07oz (Pack of 3)
$11.00
Dove Men+Care Antiperspirant Deodorant, Sensitive Shield, 2.7 Ounce (Pack of 4)
Dove Hair Therapy Daily Moisture Conditioner, 40 Fl Oz
$14.99
Dove Go Fresh Beauty Bar Soap, Cool Moisture, 6 Count
$10.59
Dove Go Fresh Cucumber & Green Tea Deodorant 48h Spray 150 ml / 5 fl oz (6-Pack)
$16.49
Dove go fresh Beauty Bar, Cucumber and Green Tea 4 oz, 6 Bar
Dove Deodorant 2.6 Ounce Adv Care Anti-Perspirant Sensitive (76ml) (3 Pack)
$12.46
DOVE Winter Care Nourishing Body Wash 24-Ounce - 3-Pack
$23.99
Dove Invisible Dry Anti White Marks Antiperspirant Deodorant, 150 Ml / 5 Oz (Pack of 6)
$17.50
Dove Winter Care Beauty Bars - 14/4oz
$28.95
Dove Men + Care Dry Spray Antiperspirant, Clean Comfort (Pack of 4)
$15.83
Dove® Beauty Bath Shower Gel Indulging Cream 16.9 Oz / 500 Ml
$7.77
Dove Men + Care Body + Face Bars Aqua Impact - 6 ct
$12.82
Dove Go Fresh Cool Moisture Body Wash, Cucumber and Green Tea Pump 34 Ounce (Pack of 2)
3 Dove Nourishing and Restore Body Wash 500ml/19.9oz (3X 500ml/16.9oz, Purely pampering-Almond cream with hibiscus)
$17.99
Dove Advanced Care Deodorants, Cool Essentials (2.6 oz., 3 pk.)
$16.87
Dove Nutritive Solutions Daily Moisture, Shampoo and Conditioner Duo Set, 40 Ounce Pump Bottles
$24.90
Dove Men + Care Body & Face Wash, Sensitive Shield 13.50 oz (Pack of 3)
$20.70
Dove Go Fresh Revive Anti-Perspirant Deodorant Stick for Unisex, 2.6 Ounce
$6.69
Dove Men + Care Extra Fresh Non-irritant Antiperspiration 5 Pack
$24.99
Dove Invisible Dry Anti White Marks Anti-Perspirant Deoderant
$5.12
(Duo Set) Dove Damage Therapy Intensive Repair, Shampoo & Conditioner, 12 Oz. bottles
$13.19
Dove Men+Care Body and Face Wash, Clean Comfort 18 oz
Dove Damage Therapy Daily Moisture Shampoo, 2.8 Pound
$14.99
Dove Men Care Non-Irritant Antiperspirant Deodorant, Extra Fresh - 2.7 Ounce (5 in Pack)
$22.47
Dove Nutritive Therapy, Nourishing Oil Care, DUO Set Shampoo + Conditioner, 12 Ounce, 1 Each
$12.98
Dove Men+Care Post Shave Balm, Hydrate+ 3.4 oz (Pack of 2)
$12.65
Dove Beauty Bar, Pink 4 oz, 14 Bar
$17.99
Dove Original Beauty Cream Bar White Soap 100 G / 3.5 Oz Bars (Pack of 12) by Dove
$16.99
Dove Shave Gel Sensitive 7 oz. (Pack of 3)
$17.26
Dove Cotton Soft Anti-Perspirant Deodorant Spray Dry 48 Hour Protection (Pack of 6) 150 Ml by Dove
$20.98
Dove Clinical Protection Anti-Perspirant Deodorant Solid, Revive 1.70 oz(Pack of 2)
$13.48
Dove Shampoo, Dryness & Itch Relief 12 oz
$5.59
Dove Body Wash Deep Moisture 24 oz, Pack of 3
$15.16
Dove Purely Pampering Body Wash, Coconut Milk (24 fl. oz., 3 pk.)
$24.09
Dove go sleeveless Antiperspirant, Beauty Finish 2.6 oz, 2 Pack
$4.99
Dove Beauty Bar, White 4 oz, 2 Bar
Dove Men + Care Revitalize Face Cream Lotion 1.69oz (Quantity 1)
$4.97
Dove Oxygen Moisture Shampoo and Conditioner Set 12 Ounce
$13.85
Sensitive Skin Unscented Moisturizing Cream Beauty Bar By Dove, 12 Count 4 Oz Each
$19.99
Dove Beauty Bar, Sensitive Skin 4 oz, 6 bar
$12.99
Dove Regenerative Nourishment Shampoo and Conditioner Set, 8.45 FL OZ each
$15.99
Dove Purely Pampering Shea Butter Beauty Bar with Vanilla Scent Soap 3.5 Oz / 100 Gr (Pack of 12 Bars)
$17.48
Dove Antiperspirant Deodorant, Powder 2.6 Ounce, (Pack of 6)
$21.36
Dove Body Wash Deep Moisture 24 oz, Pack of 3
$15.16
6 Cans of Dove Men+Care Invisible Dry 150ml Anti-Perspirant Anti-Transpirant Spray
$18.72
Dove Clinical Protection Antiperspirant Deodorant, Cool Essentials 1.7 oz
$7.72
Dove Sensitive Skin Nourishing Body Wash, 12 Ounce (2 Pack)
$19.33
Dove Men+Care Body Wash, Extra Fresh 23.5 Ounce (Pack of 2)
$20.45
Dove Men + Care Face Wash, Hydrate, 5 Oz (Pack of 3)
$18.40
Dove Men+Care Body Wash, Extra Fresh 13.5 oz, Twin Pack
$16.99
Dove Hs Srength/Shine Xho Size 7z Dove Hs Srength/Shine Xhold 7z
$8.77
Dove Dry Shampoo Refresh and Care Volume and Fullness, 5 Ounces, 3 Pack
$16.80
Dove Men+Care 2 in 1 Shampoo and Conditioner, Fresh and Clean 25.4 oz
Dove Sensitive Skin Unscented Hypo-Allergenic Beauty Bar 4 oz, 2 ea (Pack of 2)
$11.14
Dove Men + Care Body & Face Wash, Clean Comfort 13.50 oz ( Pack of 3)
$16.10
Dove Men + Care Fortfying Shampoo+conditioner 2 in 1 32fl Oz
$16.05
Dove Go Fresh Cucumber & Green Tea Scent, Antiperspirant & Deodorant Stick, 1.4 Oz / 40 Ml (Pack of 4)
$9.98
Dove Body Wash, Sensitive Skin Pump, 34 Ounce (Pack of 2)
$27.33
Dove Body Lotion, Cream Oil Intensive, 13.5 Ounce (Pack of 3)
$23.49
Dove Damage Therapy Cool Moisture Shampoo (12 oz) and Conditioner (12 oz)
$11.99
Dove Go Fresh Antiperspirant & Deodorant, Cool Essentials - 2.6 oz - 2 pk
$12.99
Dove Go Fresh Antiperspirant Deodorant, Restore, 2.6 Ounce (Pack of 2)
$9.11
Dove Men+Care Body and Face Bar, Deep Clean 4 oz, 6 Bar
$9.39
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