Cosmetics1.us

Dove Evolution Of Beauty

Dove's Evolution of Beauty Campaign Goes Viral on YouTube

by Rohit @ Influential Marketing Blog

Dove’s Campaign for Real Beauty has been one of the most talked about campaigns of the year, earning praise from people in the advertising world, as well as from real consumers for representing something different to the typical fashion advertising.  By focusing on the distorted perception of beauty that much of the fashion industry is

Evolution of the Dove “Real Beauty” Campaign

Evolution of the Dove “Real Beauty” Campaign


The Emily Program Foundation

By Awazi, a Foundation volunteer The Dove “Real Beauty” Campaign launched in 2004, and started as a “global conversation” to find the definition of beauty and what it means to people who identify a…

Twofer Tuesday: On Focus & Fantastic Aliveness

Twofer Tuesday: On Focus & Fantastic Aliveness

by acr @ Box of Crayons

Too often, we forget to appreciate the beauty in the everyday and to have compassion for ourselves. We focus on productivity at all costs and try to push through the grind, overlooking the fact that we are all individuals, with

Dove's Evolution video: No wonder our perception of beauty is distorted

Dove's Evolution video: No wonder our perception of beauty is distorted


wewomen.com

Dove's Evolution video: No wonder our perception of beauty is distorted - Dove’s Evolution film shows us why we shouldn’t compare ourselves to celebrities and stick-thin models. The short film follows a young woman's journey from normal to billboard model with the help of make-up artists...

Johnson’s

by Magda Adamska @ BrandStruck

Category: FMCG Personal care & beauty – baby care Owner of the brand: Johnson & Johnson Key competitors: Pampers, Huggies

Artykuł Johnson’s pochodzi z serwisu BrandStruck.

10 Years After Dove's 'Real Beauty' Campaign, More Brands Fight for Real Women

10 Years After Dove's 'Real Beauty' Campaign, More Brands Fight for Real Women


TakePart

It's been 10 years since Dove launched its “Campaign for Real Beauty”—a stark series of ads that were radical and simple in equal measure—featuring lovely, normal-sized women who didn’t need Photoshop to look radiant. The ads, which ran in 2004 and 2005, lacked any screed about the pressures that come with being a woman in a visual culture that’s awash in creatively lit, digitally manipulated images of dangerously thin models. The folks behind the campaign simply let us feel our own shock at seeing women with normal curves and natural faces being celebrated for their beauty in a national advertisement. Dove didn't stop there. The soap maker added rocket fuel to the conversation in 2006, when its time-lapse "Evolution" video went viral. The movement to expose marketers' use of trickery to convince us that we're failing if we don't have flawless skin and breathtaking bodies was here to stay. Significant progress has been made since Dove's campaign: The American public, the blogosphere, and the Twitterverse now routinely call out magazine publishers and marketers for digitally altering images of girls and women to shrink their bodies, smooth their faces, and otherwise morph them to fit an unrealistic, narrow ideal of beauty. The pace is quickening. In just the past few months, there's been even more progress and a few moments that drove the dialogue forward. 1. The more bare skin a campaign flaunts, the more Photoshop it typically gets. But American Eagle says its new campaign for the Aerie line of lingerie will not use any altered images of models. Instead, “real” girls and women can upload unretouched photos of themselves to a photo gallery. Sure, it’s pretty screwed up that selling underwear using real photos of gorgeous, skinny young girls (instead of digitally improved gorgeous, skinny young girls) is seen as groundbreaking. But moving away from the idealized versions of women who don't exist is a footstep Dove took, and the clothier is now following its lead. “It’s great that we’re beginning to break that down,” said Heather Arnet, executive director of the Women & Girls Foundation, of the fakeries that line the glossies. 2. Forever Yours Lingerie didn't stop working with model Elly Mayday when she was diagnosed with ovarian cancer last year. It featured beautiful shots of her with surgical scars unhidden and no wig or digital fakery to hide the baldness that resulted from her cancer treatment. Rather than looking like something’s missing, Mayday’s baldness comes across as strong and sexy. It’s empowering for the rest of us to see a woman outside the beauty mold we’ve been sold for so long—and to find ourselves aspiring to emulate her sexy confidence and appeal. (Forever Yours also gets points for raising money toward Mayday’s medical expenses.) 3. A new time-lapse video released by Hungarian pop star Boggie shows her singing a pop song called “Nouveau Parfum” while being Photoshopped, a fresh take on Dove's "Evolution" that's amplified by the resigned expression on her face. As the song unfolds, pieces of her disappear and are overwritten: Boggie’s eyes, like everyone else’s, aren’t exactly symmetrical. So one is deleted, then replaced by an exact copy of the other. Not a single square inch of her face or hair is left untouched. 4. Earlier last month during the Golden Globes, actor Diane Keaton took the stage to honor Woody Allen, her tousled hair and menswear-chic outfit reminding us of the trend she set when Annie Hall hit theaters in 1977. It was also clear on high-definition screens across America that at 68, she's got (oh, the horror!) lots of lines on her gorgeous face. When her speech ended, the network cut to a commercial break featuring Keaton selling L'Oréal cosmetics without a line on her digitally enhanced face, seemingly sporting the skin of a 25-year-old. Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook quickly lit up with scorn. That social media response is valuable, Arnet says, because younger women and girls are active on Instagram and Twitter and are participating in those conversations. 5. Former Cosmopolitan editor Leah Hardy drew attention for admitting that during her tenure the magazine routinely Photoshopped out the protruding bones of super skinny models to keep readers from seeing how emaciated the models really were. Since that admission surfaced, before-and-after comparisons of bone-thin models and their healthier-looking altered images have been popping up around the Web. Apparently the world’s top fashion magazines, despite the huge budgets at their disposal, cannot find a single woman on the planet who isn’t either too thin or too fat for their liking. It’s further reinforcement of the conclusion we’d love to share with every tween girl who’s just beginning to notice her appearance: The elusive “perfection” that every cosmetic company and clothing retailer is trying to sell you does not exist. 6. Mindy Kaling might not have minded, but many other people did: When Elle magazine published covers for its February 2014 issue featuring Kaling, readers and pundits immediately questioned why Kaling's cover was a black-and-white close-up rather than the full-color, full-body shots of the other (skinnier and more "conventionally" beautiful) actors. That's the key: We've begun to make a habit of questioning how women are depicted and what tools are being used to change or edit their appearance for public consumption. Yes, the visual landscape is still awash with altered images, surgically altered models, and the pressure to be thinner, younger, and closer to the narrow beauty ideal that so much marketing pushes on us. Marketers aren’t going to stop selling us

Dove Real Beauty Sketches | BLOG

Dove Real Beauty Sketches | BLOG


BLOG

We all remember Dove’s Evolution campaign about the realities of makeup and Photoshop from 2006. The video fast-forwards us through a pretty, but ordinary looking woman going through all the hair, makeup, and retouching that goes into the final, “perfected” looks we see in magazines. The video is just over a minute, but is amazingly..

Transformation Tuesday: Dove's Campaign for Real Beauty - Digital Natives

Transformation Tuesday: Dove's Campaign for Real Beauty - Digital Natives


Digital Natives

In the first of our Transformation Tuesday series, we’re showing a bit of love to those who’ve used digital content to innovate and improve the perception of their brand. First up: Dove. The ‘Campaign for Real Beauty’ has been recognised by Advertising Age as the best campaign of the 21st century. Although Dove used real …

Prada

by Magda Adamska @ BrandStruck

Category: Apparel – luxury apparel; FMCG Personal care & beauty – fragrances; Retail – fashion stores, e-retail Owner of the brand: Prada SpA Group Key competitors: Louis Vuitton, Gucci, Hermès, Ralph Lauren

Artykuł Prada pochodzi z serwisu BrandStruck.

Always

by Magda Adamska @ BrandStruck

Category: FMCG Personal care & beauty – feminine care Owner of the brand: Procter & Gamble Co. Key competitors: Carefree, Bodyform, Kotex, o.b., Stayfree

Artykuł Always pochodzi z serwisu BrandStruck.

A brand for social change? The myth of Dove's 'real beauty'

A brand for social change? The myth of Dove's 'real beauty'


The Conversation

Why do women hate to have their picture taken? That’s the question Dove, the global beauty brand, asks in its latest advertisement. The video – see below – is part of Dove’s campaign for “real beauty…

Dove ad wins Cannes film prize

Dove ad wins Cannes film prize


the Guardian

A Dove ad won the top award in the film category at the Cannes Lions International Advertising Festival. By Mark Sweney.

Procter & Gamble

by Magda Adamska @ BrandStruck

Category: FMCG Household products; FMCG Personal care & beauty Owner of the brand: Procter & Gamble Co. Key competitors: Unilever, Colgate-Palmolive, Reckitt Benckiser Group

Artykuł Procter & Gamble pochodzi z serwisu BrandStruck.

Wearing perfume, an almost sacred beauty ritual

by aufeminin @ Womenology

The majority of women put perfume on every day, so much so that 143,000 bottles of perfume are sold every day in France (source: Planetoscope). And what might seem like a simple beauty step has a much deeper cultural dimension …

Continuer la lecture

The post Wearing perfume, an almost sacred beauty ritual appeared first on Womenology.

Real Beauty? Measuring the Dove Marketing Program's Success

Real Beauty? Measuring the Dove Marketing Program's Success


EnergizeGrowth

More than 10 years after its debut, the Dove Real Beauty program remains a marketing icon and a source of controversy. What did it accomplish?

Dove's real beauty ads 'were retouched'

Dove's real beauty ads 'were retouched'


Telegraph.co.uk

A major advertising campaign, which flaunted the "real beauty" of its ordinary women stars, was perhaps not as naturalistic as first thought after an expert who worked on the pictures claimed he touched them up.

Diesel

by Magda Adamska @ BrandStruck

Category: Apparel – high street apparel; FMCG Personal care & beauty – fragrances; Retail – fashion stores, e-retail Owner of the brand: OTB Group Key competitors: Levi’s, Wrangler, Pepe Jeans, Lee

Artykuł Diesel pochodzi z serwisu BrandStruck.

Victoria’s Secret

by Magda Adamska @ BrandStruck

Category: Apparel – high street apparel; Retail – fashion stores, e-retail; FMCG Personal care & beauty – body care, fragrances Owner of the brand: L Brands Inc. Key competitors: Aerie, Agent Provocateur, Triumph International, Intimissimi

Artykuł Victoria’s Secret pochodzi z serwisu BrandStruck.

Axe

by Magda Adamska @ BrandStruck

Category: FMCG Personal care & beauty – body care, deodorants, fragrances, hair care Owner of the brand: Unilever Key competitors: Nivea, L’Oréal, Gillette, Old Spice

Artykuł Axe pochodzi z serwisu BrandStruck.

Dove Evolution Commercial

Dove Evolution Commercial


@TheSocyCinema

Tags: gender , bodies ,  media , ideal beauty, image, representation, sexism, self esteem, 0 0 to 05 mins Year: 2006 Length: 1:15 Access: YouTube Summary: The caption under this clip reads,...

“Without the internet, I wouldn’t be the woman that I am today”

by aufeminin @ Womenology

A meeting with Capucine, the creator of the blog Babillages How did you think of the idea to create Babillages? I was 19 and a student in communication and journalism. I started my first internship in women’s press, mainly in …

Continuer la lecture

The post “Without the internet, I wouldn’t be the woman that I am today” appeared first on Womenology.

Why People Hate Dove's 'Real Beauty Sketches' Video

Why People Hate Dove's 'Real Beauty Sketches' Video


Business Insider

What's wrong with the viral success?

Dove | BrandStruck: Brand strategy database

Dove | BrandStruck: Brand strategy database


BrandStruck

Category: FMCG Personal care & beauty – hair care, body care, deodorants Owner of the brand: Unilever Key competitors: L’Oréal, Garnier, Nivea, Olay, Avon

Pampers

by Magda Adamska @ BrandStruck

Category: FMCG Personal care & beauty – baby care Owner of the brand: Procter & Gamble Co. Key competitors: Huggies, Johnson’s

Artykuł Pampers pochodzi z serwisu BrandStruck.

Interview with Tim Piper, Dove Real Beauty | Box of Crayons

Interview with Tim Piper, Dove Real Beauty | Box of Crayons


Box of Crayons

Listen to Michael's interview with Tim Piper, talking about the Dove Real Beauty campaign

Check Out Dove’s New ‘Real Beauty’ Campaign

Check Out Dove’s New ‘Real Beauty’ Campaign


Fortune

It’s confusing a lot of people.

Dove: the perfect success story in advertising

by aufeminin @ Womenology

In 2004 Dove launched a ground breaking worldwide advertising campaign in the beauty industry. The brand created a new way to address their public which aimed to be “real” by getting rid of the complexes that beauty product consumers suffer from. …

Continuer la lecture

The post Dove: the perfect success story in advertising appeared first on Womenology.

No Wonder Our Perception Of Beauty is Distorted

by gretchen @ No Wonder Our Perception Of Beauty is Distorted – Girls Can't WHAT?

My sister insisted I post the new Dove Commercial that shows the evolution of a "Supermodel". In light of the recent Hooters and Trophy Wife threads, it's fabulous to take such an eye-opening look at how "beauty" is created. This is an absolutely amazing video that every girl must see. Please support Dove: www.campaignforrealbeauty.com

Beauty and sensuality are significant assets in the job market

by aufeminin @ Womenology

For some decades, studies have shown that people who are considered to be physically beautiful are at an advantage in a number of areas, both private and professional. Three recent books confirm this trend by showing that beauty has become …

Continuer la lecture

The post Beauty and sensuality are significant assets in the job market appeared first on Womenology.

Unilever

by Magda Adamska @ BrandStruck

Category: FMCG Food; FMCG Non-alcoholic beverages; FMCG Household products; FMCG Personal care & beauty Owner of the brand: Unilever Key competitors: Procter & Gamble, Nestlé, Colgate-Palmolive, The Kraft Heinz Company, Reckitt Benckiser Group

Artykuł Unilever pochodzi z serwisu BrandStruck.

How Dove's Real Beauty Video Touched a Nerve and Went Viral [VIDEO]

How Dove's Real Beauty Video Touched a Nerve and Went Viral [VIDEO]


The Content Strategist

The heart string-tugging video, created by Ogilvy & Mathers Brazil, has social and mainstream media buzzing. Here's why.

Roberto Cavalli

by Magda Adamska @ BrandStruck

Category: Apparel – luxury apparel; FMCG Personal care & beauty – fragrances; Retail – fashion stores, e-retail Owner of the brand: Clessidra SGR S.p.A. (90%) and Roberto Cavalli (10%) Key competitors: Gucci, Valentino, Versace, Prada, Armani, Dolce & Gabbana

Artykuł Roberto Cavalli pochodzi z serwisu BrandStruck.

Burberry

by Magda Adamska @ BrandStruck

Category: Apparel – luxury apparel, FMCG Personal care & beauty – fragrances, make-up; Retail – fashion stores, e-retail Owner of the brand: Burberry Group plc Key competitors: Louis Vuitton, Hermès, Gucci, Prada, Ralph Lauren

Artykuł Burberry pochodzi z serwisu BrandStruck.

Why Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie’s Beauty Campaign Matters

by truth @ My Body My Image

Hosted By EllE By Chaédria LaBouvier Oct 21, 2016 It was announced today that celebrated author, feminist, and aesthete Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie is the face of British brand Boots’ new beauty campaign. The campaign launches today, and according to Huffington Post UK it will include print, digital, and TV components. But it is much more … Continue reading Why Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie’s Beauty Campaign Matters

Teen Vogue, Shows “Ethnic” Beauty in its original form…

by truth @ My Body My Image

Hosted by Teenvogue.com Borrowing from other cultures has never been trendier—or more taboo. From afros to cornrows, henna to headdresses, cultural appropriation is a trending topic on the tips of tongues everywhere. (To get caught up on the conversation, look no further than Amandla Stenberg’s brilliant, critically acclaimed video Don’t Cash Crop My Cornrows where … Continue reading Teen Vogue, Shows “Ethnic” Beauty in its original form…

L’Oréal: a success story in international marketing to women

by aufeminin @ Womenology

Established in 130 countries across five continents, L’Oréal group’s international success represents an international marketing model based on skill, knowledge and an unshakeable reputation. How has L’Oréal created this image and reputation? How has the group won over women around the …

Continuer la lecture

The post L’Oréal: a success story in international marketing to women appeared first on Womenology.

Why Dove's Real Beauty Sketches is better positioned than prior campaigns | Adam Williams

Why Dove's Real Beauty Sketches is better positioned than prior campaigns | Adam Williams


Adam Williams

Dove began its crusade against the beauty industry with the short "Dove Evolution". I want to explain why the Real Beauty Sketches campaign is better.

Dove's "Campaign for Real Beauty" Is the Campaign of 21st Century - Marketing magazin

Dove's "Campaign for Real Beauty" Is the Campaign of 21st Century - Marketing magazin


Marketing magazin

The iconic campaign was picked by every one of the Advertising Age judges as belonging on the list, and one that was described by the panel as “groundbreaking, brave, bold, insightful, transparent and authentic.” As Ad Age states, Dove began its campaign with a global survey in 2004 that found, among other things, that only 23 …

Over Competitive Parent...Oh No!

by noreply@blogger.com (Michelle) @ Michelle's Media Blog

I believe that in any child or athlete’s life they will always have as their number one fans their family or friends, but nothing is worse than an over competitive parent. A parent who is very competitive is very hard to deal with and often embarrassing. Have you ever seen any type of child competing in a particular sport and have their wild parent giving pep talks, yelling, or even going as far as holding up cheesy signs. Well these are all symptoms are of an over bearing competitive parent. Media is one of the main causes for an over competitive parent in my eyes. Media constructs the message that to be successful, you have to be a winner. This means winning in every aspect of your life. We all know that clearly this is not always possibly, usually there is always someone who is better then you, but just giving it your all is always worth it. Media puts it in our heads that the only people who will ever get anywhere in life are the ones who constantly win. The media implies that not only will winning help us succeed, but it will improve our reputation and status in life. This is not always true, just because you win something does not mean that you will be a better person. Sadly, this is what many parents believe which leads them to become over competitive. Often they will push their kids past their limits doing anything possible to win. Not only is this unhealthy, but downright mean. No parent should be forcing their child to win by bribery or threats or just plain pressure. Children are too young for this and should be competing to compete against themselves, and not always against others. Many interpret these messages from the media in different ways. When some people see an Olympic medalist, they admire the hard work the athlete must have put in and all of their dedication. Others may be very jealous and do anything in their pathway to get themselves, or their child to become such an amazing athlete as they see in the athletes competing in the Olympics. Often if a parent was not successful in their childhood they will also put more pressure onto their child so they can “relive their dreams”. Most likely, it was the media which put the idea of wanting to be a successful child into their head. Usually in all of the hit TV shows when children compete in anything, they always come out on top and are now the most popular and are able to have such large bragging rights. Which parent does not want their child to be liked by others, so why not force your child to be a winner? Often, media messages such as commercials for winning athletes are produced to sell a product which are endorsed the athlete. By having a winning athlete in the picture, we are made to think that it is such a huge part of how the athlete won, and if we use such a product we will come out on top just like the athlete did. If parents see a commercial for a specific energy drink or protein bar which is endorsed by a gold medal athlete, why would they not purchase this product for their child to consume? Their belief is its only food; it can’t hurt them, so why not see if it will improve my child! Many parents see this as a gateway to help their child win. Some parents take matters into their own hands and the situation goes way out of control. Also I believe that having TV shows where their child can be in the spotlight such as TLC’S “toddlers in Tiaras” is not a positive way to show a child being successful. In this show we continually see the child’s parents trying to coach their 5 year old child into becoming a beauty queen, rather than a child expressing their own wishes to become one. Every “Pageant Mom” seems crazy, and will do anything to make their child win. The mother gets the child ready for hours, practice routines with them, and even does the routine themselves while out in the audience incase their child forgets. This gets over the top very easily especially considering there are so many parents who want their child to win. Not only do they want them to win, they want them to get the top over all grand prize, or the mother is disappointed. At the end the show you see reality TV to the extreme because the show concentrates on televising just the crazy pageant moms fighting with each other over who’s child should have won and how the judging was based. This all relates back to us and the media. We as humans love to watch reality shows. We love to see others in difficult situations and we enjoy being able to point out other’s flaws. When we are able to see others in an argument, it almost makes us forget about what a bad day we have had and focus on them. It takes our mind off our loves and puts us in another world where we as the viewers can just watch in other people’s drama without having to partake in it. Competitive parents are just another shot of reality TV for us.

Here is an article to show you not only if you have but if you are a over competitive parent! http://www.jobeaufoix.com/2010/03/04/competitive-parents-are-you-one/