Cosmetics1.us

Dove Marketing Campaign

Dove Wants Women to Redefine Beauty

Dove Wants Women to Redefine Beauty


Motto

They want you to #RaisetheBeautyBar

Good Campaign of the Week: Vice “Safe Sesh”

by D&AD @ Brandingmag

If there is anything that history has taught us, it’s that people will invariably do whatever they damn well please, with very little regard for consequence. So, when we’re talking about illegal substances, the ever so tiny matter of them being illegal is exactly that – ever so tiny. As long as they are readily […]

IN Marketing Ranked #1 Advertising Agency in Orange County

by ampdev @ Advantage Marketing Partners

The Orange County Business Journal ranked IN Marketing Services the #1 Advertising Agency in Orange County.

The post IN Marketing Ranked #1 Advertising Agency in Orange County appeared first on Advantage Marketing Partners.

Can Dove carry the #RealBeauty legacy with Break the Rules? - Social Samosa

Can Dove carry the #RealBeauty legacy with Break the Rules? - Social Samosa


Social Samosa

For decades cosmetic, skincare, and fashion brands have peddled the notion that in order to look beautiful a woman has to conform

The Best of Global Digital Marketing in Dhaka, Bangladesh

by Best Marketing @ Best Marketing

26th September 2016

How To Get Word-of-Mouth: 40+ Successful Examples To Learn From

by Jon Tan @ Word-of-Mouth and Referral Marketing Blog

Over the past year, the ReferralCandy blog has been analyzing and dissecting all sorts of word-of-mouth successes: Established brands, new ideas on Kickstarter, and everything in between. We’ve read countless books and studies about the subject: Made to Stick, Tipping Point, Unleashing the Ideavirus, Contagious… you name it, we’ve probably read it. We’ve learned a […]

The post How To Get Word-of-Mouth: 40+ Successful Examples To Learn From appeared first on Word-of-Mouth and Referral Marketing Blog.

International round-up: Facebook fined in Spain, L’Oréal uses AI to target Chinese shoppers

by Charlotte Rogers @ Marketing Week

Plus marriage equality opponents in Australia outspend their opposition by nearly 500% in TV advertising and B&Q faces disruption from a French DIY website.

The post International round-up: Facebook fined in Spain, L’Oréal uses AI to target Chinese shoppers appeared first on Marketing Week.

Dove's "Campaign for Real Beauty" Is the Campaign of 21st Century - Marketing magazin

Dove's "Campaign for Real Beauty" Is the Campaign of 21st Century - Marketing magazin


Marketing magazin

The iconic campaign was picked by every one of the Advertising Age judges as belonging on the list, and one that was described by the panel as “groundbreaking, brave, bold, insightful, transparent and authentic.” As Ad Age states, Dove began its campaign with a global survey in 2004 that found, among other things, that only 23 …

Winning Over Female Beauty Consumers in India - A Lesson From Dove - GFluence

Winning Over Female Beauty Consumers in India - A Lesson From Dove - GFluence


GFluence

The Dove “Real Beauty” campaign has an iconic status among marketing circles. Using “real” women who buy the products instead of models seems simple, yet it defied everyday advertising practices. After major success in the West, Dove continues to reinvent its famous advertising campaign in other countries. Taking in account cultural specifics it snatched its share of female beauty consumers in India’s market. Let’s take look how the famous beauty products company adapted its western marketing strategy to make it in India.The Original Dove Real Beauty CampaignIt all started in 2003 in the UK. Remember these billboards?Source: Creativebrief.comSince then [...] Read more

Marc Pritchard: 2017 is the year the bloom came off the rose for digital media

by Sarah Vizard @ Marketing Week

Procter & Gamble's marketing boss says this year has been a big wake-up call for the industry, but believes once the work on transparency is done digital can enter its next phase of mass one-on-one marketing.

The post Marc Pritchard: 2017 is the year the bloom came off the rose for digital media appeared first on Marketing Week.

Social Purpose Marketing for Behaviour Change

by Rachel Adrian @ JS Daw & Associates

By Rachel Adrian Recent years have seen a huge increase in companies getting involved in social purpose marketing. Rather than... Read more »

The post Social Purpose Marketing for Behaviour Change appeared first on JS Daw & Associates.

5 Things Great Product Marketers Do

5 Things Great Product Marketers Do

by Katie Martell @ THE BLOG -

Something not many people know about me is that I’ve got a twin sister.

She’s brilliant. If you are into the left-brain right-brain dichotomy of categorizing people, then she is the pragmatic left with a PhD in biochemistry and I the demiurgic right with a career in marketing communications and a propensity for trusting my intuition.

As everything in life, however, we both exhibit a holistic blend of both left brain logic, and right brain creativity.

In the industry of marketing, we are often quick to separate those in our profession into these two categories - data-driven and analytical marketers against creative, visual, and artistic. Whether you’re left, right, or center…  marketing is about empathy.  

I’ve written before about the need to tap into not only both sides of that three pound lump in our heads, but also another vital organ in our systems:

“The new truth is that marketing is a trifecta of art, heart and science.”

And while it’s true that many of our colleagues could be easily categorized into one or the other, the best marketers I’ve seen are a stellar mix of left brain, right brain and empathy. And perhaps nobody characterizes this blend more eloquently than a great product marketer.

5 Characteristics of Great Product Marketers

One of my very favorite people in this world is Hally Pinaud, a product marketer at Marketo. She’s the best at what she does, and we are all going to be very lucky to work for her someday… until then, her and I recently chatted about what great product marketers look like:

1. "They are great storytellers, but never tell a fairytale." 

Studies show that our brains (those three pound lumps I mentioned earlier) are not hard-wired to understand logic or retain facts for very long. They are wired to understand and retain stories. When used right in marketing, with emotional drivers and authenticity, storytelling results in persuasion and action.

Great product marketers understand their product, of course, but more importantly they understand how it connects to the pain of the buyer. They should articulate that story better than most, putting it together in a powerful way that resonates with a customer's day-to-day life. They not only do it for themselves, they can scale it to the rest of their organization, leading me to our next trait:

2. They are great trainers

Not only can great product marketers tell good stories that tie product back to a problem, they can equip the organization to do the same. A hallmark of great product marketing is their collateral. Good collateral does a lot of the heavy lifting for somebody – but it's not enough by itself.

A PDF can't teach someone when, and how, to use it effectively. Research has found that up to 70% of B2B content goes unused (SiriusDecisions), partly due to its irrelevance, and partly due to a lack of training.

Product marketers must therefore be excellent trainers, able to put tools in front of people and teach them to look for the right clues to leverage them correctly. When in the sales cycle, or in the lifecycle of a customer, is this part of the story relevant? When in that lifecycle are you making this connection?

They must not only create content that moves people along a journey, demonstrating how the solution can solve for pain every step of the way, but articulate when and where to use that content in context. Excellent product marketers are able to evolve from simply equipping the team to true empowerment.

3. They understand the lifecycle – yes, including post-sales

Speaking of lifecycle, great product marketers have a keen understanding of the whole lifecycle of a customer, not just up to the point of acquisition, but also what comes after. They understand meeting with current customers, and knowing the process, can illuminate whether what you’re doing delivers the right level of impact to them.

While many product marketers are great with sales, see my next point, they often risk ignoring the post-sales team. In an age of buyer mistrust and strong competition, our post-sales team is critical to delivering the type of customer experience that creates advocates.

This team brings the product vision to reality, and forms the very foundation for word-of-mouth marketing. For product marketers to have true impact, they’ve got to foster clarity and collaboration with this often grey area of the customer lifecycle.

4. They respect and work with sales

This really should be point #1. One reason I’ve always respected, admired, and appreciated great product marketing is their position within the organization, connecting product development and management to the marketing team, and most importantly acting as a liaison to the front lines of the business, sales.

More than a liaison, great product marketers understand and respect the profession of sales. They forge powerful partnerships that transcend a near-universal narrative of “animosity” that predicates the sales and marketing relationship. They respect that intangible aspect of great sales that requires a high level of emotional intelligence (or EQ) – that je ne sais quoi that you can’t teach.

Product marketing gives sales the ammunition they need to have honest conversations with people, making sure they’re informed so they can channel that EQ in an authentic way. That means being a realist, giving them real-world examples of your competition – the good, bad, and the ugly. They have to speak authentically, and informed, about shortcomings in order to do what they do best.

Great product marketers challenge their colleagues across the organization to do their best work, and trust that they will.

 5. They work in the grey areas

“People are delighted and deals are won in the grey areas.”

This was one of my favorite quotes from Hally, who explained that a great PPT deck can’t get into the nitty gritty of a customer’s experience. Every buyer is different. The ultimate role of a great product marketer is to ensure their organization has empathy for these grey areas, and feel empowered to make decisions with authenticity and realism that allows them to operate in good times and bad.

At the end of the day, product marketing sits in a very strategic arm of the organization. Blame comes to them when things don’t go well, respect comes when they do. There's no mystery why the good ones are in high demand. As someone who comes from and gravitates to the wedge of the marketing pie chart that deals with comms, I find good product marketers to be inordinately invaluable.

I raise my glass (err… of coffee) this morning to each of you. Happy Monday.

Thank you to Hally for these insights - you can follow her on Twitter here.

 

This post originally appeared on LinkedIn

Dove Takes Real Beauty Campaign in Search of Self-Esteem Australia

Dove Takes Real Beauty Campaign in Search of Self-Esteem Australia


brandchannel:

Dove partners with Coles Australia to bring self-esteem workshops to girls, illustrating need with ad campaign showing girls' negative search queries

MARKETING STRATEGY: Take advantage of micromoments to communicate with consumers

by iMagiNation2016 @

                    The days of launching an ad campaign with just TV or radio spots and print advertising have gone the way of the rotary dial telephone.  With the plethora of handheld electronic devices available today, smart marketers know they need to take advantage of every moment […]

8 Steps to a Successful First 90 Days as a B2B CMO

by Bob Domenz @ Brandingmag

The role of Chief Marketing Officer, or any senior marketing position, is always a challenging one – and never more so than in the first 90 days. Whether you are a CMO or, as I have been, one of their trusted advisors, you know that preparing for and working through this initial stage is critical. […]

Meet the president: Spencer Baim (Vice Media, UK)

by Gašper @ Marketing magazin

New York, when they see it for the first time, can have a profound effect on people. That was certainly the case for Spencer Baim, who says it was the start of a love affair. He adds: “I arrived here at the age of 22 and never left.” Now chief strategic officer of Vice Media, […]

The post Meet the president: Spencer Baim (Vice Media, UK) appeared first on Marketing magazin.

Facebook, Uber, Evans Cycles: Everything that matters this morning

by Marketing Week Reporters @ Marketing Week

Our round-up of all the marketing news this morning.

The post Facebook, Uber, Evans Cycles: Everything that matters this morning appeared first on Marketing Week.

IAB Macedonia names new leadership

by Gašper @ Marketing magazin

Also, the new Board has been named as well. Besides Eftimovski, it consists of Darko Lazarevski (Kajgana Media), Nikola Ancevski (Ovation), Ira Babić (Brand Union), Damjan Dano (IWM Network), Nenad Ristevski (PublicisONE Mackdonija), Meri Shesho (McCann Skopje), Sashka Nikolova (Media Plan) and Igor Popovski (CrnoBelo Media). The main goal of the Bureau, established in 2012 […]

The post IAB Macedonia names new leadership appeared first on Marketing magazin.

HUB Magazine Names IN Marketing Services #7 on the HUB TOP 20 Report

by ampdev @ Advantage Marketing Partners

IN Marketing Services today announced HUB Magazine, a leading brand experience publication, has ranked the agency #7 on the HUB Top 20 Report.

The post HUB Magazine Names IN Marketing Services #7 on the HUB TOP 20 Report appeared first on Advantage Marketing Partners.

Facebook’s Sheryl Sandberg: Digital is causing the collapse of the marketing funnel

by Sarah Vizard @ Marketing Week

Facebook’s chief operating officer suggests the growing importance of digital and mobile and the speed at which consumers can find information is causing a fundamental change in the way brands communicate.

The post Facebook’s Sheryl Sandberg: Digital is causing the collapse of the marketing funnel appeared first on Marketing Week.

Dove Real Beauty Sketches – best marketing campaign of the century?

Dove Real Beauty Sketches – best marketing campaign of the century?


Formedia | PR - Marketing - Design - Web

Who would have thought that a brand which primarily sells toiletries, could deliver a promotion that arguably wins the title of best viral campaign?   Dove: how to build a brand In 2004, inter...

The Future of Cause Marketing

by Rachel Adrian @ JS Daw & Associates

Cause marketing has changed rapidly in recent years and these changes have the potential to impact their contribution to the... Read more »

The post The Future of Cause Marketing appeared first on JS Daw & Associates.

Next: We won’t retaliate against Amazon, we will learn from them

by Thomas Hobbs @ Marketing Week

Despite Amazon’s own-label fashion brand Find going after its core customers, Next chief executive Lord Wolfson says he won’t slip into 'terrible analogies of war'.

The post Next: We won’t retaliate against Amazon, we will learn from them appeared first on Marketing Week.

Homophobia Allegations From the Daughter of Bulleit Bourbon’s Founder Are Rocking the Beverage Industry

Homophobia Allegations From the Daughter of Bulleit Bourbon’s Founder Are Rocking the Beverage Industry

by Christina Cauterucci @ The XX Factor

In January 2017, Hollis Bulleit announced that she was leaving her job at Diageo, one of the world’s largest alcoholic beverage producers, and owner of Bulleit Bourbon. The daughter of Bulleit Bourbon founder Tom Bulleit, Hollis is well-known in the beverage industry for her longtime service to her family’s company, her elaborate headwear—she recently sold a collection of six of her homemade fascinators to help pay her “legal fees”—and her winning demeanor. Many were surprised by her departure from the brand she’d repped for more than a quarter-century, but few knew why they’d parted ways.

Over the past few days, Hollis has published several lengthy Facebook posts explaining what went down, from her perspective. According to her, the Bulleit family refused to accept her queer identity when she came out 10 years ago, and they rejected her decade-long partnership with a woman named Cher. While the spouses and partners of her siblings were included in family photos and press for the company, Hollis writes, she and Cher were excluded from major events and slowly edged out of the picture. Hollis, who has been publicly out for many years, says she was informed in December that she no longer had a job with Diageo; Diageo claims it offered her a multi-year renewed contract but was unable to agree with Hollis on the terms.

She helped break ground on the company’s new distillery in 2014, but says Cher didn’t get an invite. Neither was asked to attend the grand opening in March, Hollis alleges. “In 2008, I was asked to come home for Christmas; yet Cher was not invited,” Hollis wrote on July 31. “The only holiday that we attended was Thanksgiving in 2016, and then we were promptly uninvited via text from the following core family Christmas.”

Her allegations illuminate the complex responsibilities a corporation that owns a family business faces. In these cases, family troubles are de facto workplace troubles, and family homophobia could amount to employee discrimination based on sexual orientation. “Because family was business and intertwined with a global corporation, I find it odd that I did not benefit from the departments and safeguards that are put into place to either intervene or provide mediation or educational diversity training as would be the expected protocol for employees in this type of situation,” Hollis wrote in one of her posts. For several years, the Human Rights Campaign has given Diageo North America a perfect score on its Corporate Equality Index, a measure of companies’ support for LGBTQ employees and issues.

Hollis declined to answer any questions, but told me that she and Diageo “have come to a 24 hour halt” and any press “could mess up legal proceedings.” A Diageo spokesperson had this to say in an emailed statement:

In advance of Hollis’ contract expiring in 2016, we offered her a multi-year extension. Despite it being an increase versus her previous arrangement, we were unfortunately not able to reach agreement with her on this new contract. Any implication that she was fired, or that failure to agree to terms on this contract was due to her LGBT identity, is simply false. We are very proud of our long track record of work, through many of our brands, to support the LGBT community. We are also appreciative of Hollis’s past efforts on behalf of the brand and the industry.

But as Hollis’ claims and Diageo’s clash in the press, the story of Bulleit family infighting has been rocking the beverage industry. “All that is evil, impersonal and dirty about the business is laid bare right here. It’s a rotten affair Bulleit and it’s gonna hurt your brand,” wrote the owner of a Louisville, Kentucky whiskey bar of one of Hollis’ Facebook posts. A representative of a Santa Cruz bar has said the establishment will no longer buy Bulleit “in solidarity with those individuals whom have been rejected by their families for living their authentic lives,” and will use the proceeds from sales of its remaining Bulleit stock to “benefit the LGBTQIA community of Santa Cruz.” Seattle Cocktail Culture, a bar-finding app, posted that Hollis “has been an incredible advocate for American whiskey & her family’s brand,” so the proprietor is “done with Bulleit; that might not help Hollis but I won't be apart of this gross mistreatment.”

“She was the reason the craft bartending community embraced the brand,” Seattle bartender Elizabeth Dingivan posted on Tuesday, “and given the attempts to erase her legacy and co-opt her work, we are prepared to move on from Bulleit as a brand altogether.”

Now, Hollis worries that she won’t be able to find new work in alcohol brand promotion at age 43 without recommendations from her former employer. And she writes that she was surprised to learn that she can’t trademark her own name and start a new whiskey company under that moniker because Diageo would legally be able to challenge the brand’s name for being too close to Bulleit Bourbon.

Among some in the beverage industry, though, Hollis’ name still means something, even if it has no more connection to the brand she helped build. New Orleans bar owner T. Cole Newton writes that he took the occasion of an annual gathering of bartenders “to respectfully tell Tom Bulleit publicly and in person how much harder it is to support his brand without someone like his daughter Hollis involved.” Diageo and Bulleit Bourbon may have to come up with a better explanation for Hollis’ dissatisfaction if they want to keep the business of such proprietors. For those bartenders and business owners, loyalty to the brand means loyalty to the woman who helped get them hooked.

Morrisons on how staff are inspiring both its marketing and turnaround

by Thomas Hobbs @ Marketing Week

Morrisons' top marketer discusses the brand's ongoing turnaround, the Amazon deal and his expectations for Christmas.

The post Morrisons on how staff are inspiring both its marketing and turnaround appeared first on Marketing Week.

Dove: Body confidence campaigns prove our authenticity

Dove: Body confidence campaigns prove our authenticity


Marketing Week

Dove says it “walks the talk” when it comes to its body confidence campaigns, as it launches a toolkit to tackle body image anxiety among children.

Dove Ads | Digital Marketing & Social Media Campaigns

Dove Ads | Digital Marketing & Social Media Campaigns


Digital Agency Network

Featuring creative Dove ads, inspiring Dove digital marketing campaigns, social media marketing campaigns, Dove commercials and hot news.

Disney shifts focus to put digital content at the heart of its brand partnerships

by Leonie Roderick @ Marketing Week

Disney is launching its own digital ad network as it looks to “monetise content that hasn’t been monetised in the past”.

The post Disney shifts focus to put digital content at the heart of its brand partnerships appeared first on Marketing Week.

Uber brand takes another hit as it loses London licence

by Sarah Vizard @ Marketing Week

Transport for London says Uber is not “fit and proper” to hold a private hire operator licence as it raises concerns over a lack of corporate responsibility.

The post Uber brand takes another hit as it loses London licence appeared first on Marketing Week.

Dove, please for the love of God, stop making videos and just make soap

Dove, please for the love of God, stop making videos and just make soap


The Daily Dot

Dove, please for the love of God, stop making videos and just make soap.

Wonder Woman Was Reportedly Funded by the Koch Brothers. That Shouldn’t Surprise Any of Us.

Wonder Woman Was Reportedly Funded by the Koch Brothers. That Shouldn’t Surprise Any of Us.

by Christina Cauterucci @ The XX Factor

Wonder Woman hit a major milestone on Tuesday, when its North American box-office take topped $400 million. The film is now the highest-grossing film ever made by a female director and the third highest-grossing domestic release in Warner Bros. history.

Woohoo! Feminist #win! Think of all that money flying out of women’s paychecks and into the pockets of female actresses and a female director, keeping it in the sisterhood! And also, think of the way, way, larger sums of money going into the bank accounts of the right-wing billionaires who funded it!

Want to listen to this article out loud? Hear it on Slate Voice.

It turns out that the feminist fave of the summer reportedly counts among its investors not just any rich dudes, but the literal Koch brothers. These are the men we can thank for the Tea Party, the funding of the “education reform” movement and organized opposition to Obamacare, and some of the most concerted efforts against environmental regulations the country has seen. They are some of the wealthiest men in the world, and they use their money to influence policies that protect the rich at the expense of the poor.

The Hollywood Reporter published a piece Wednesday morning describing Charles and David Koch’s “significant stake” worth “tens of millions of dollars” in RatPac-Dune Entertainment, which invested $450 million in 2013 to cover Warner Bros.’ entire slate of up to 75 movies over four years. That includes the “masterpiece of subversive feminism” that argues, according to the Washington Post’s Alyssa Rosenberg, that a world without misogyny “would be liberating and wonderful for men.” Post-Wonder Woman, misogyny is still around, but the success of the film has no doubt been liberating and wonderful for the men who funded it. (A Koch Industries spokeswoman gave THR the vague assurance that the brothers themselves and Koch Industries “do not have any involvement with this investment.”)

Full disclosure: I did not find Wonder Woman to be the tear-jerking feminist masterwork so many of my colleagues and contemporaries claim to have seen. To me, the movie baited women into the theater with some heavy-handed surface-level empowerment schtick, then gave us 180 minutes of jokes about how sexy half-dressed women are when they know how to fight. That normally wouldn’t have bugged me so much—blockbuster films are blockbuster films, and superhero movies are among the most formulaic of blockbuster genres—if critics and lay-viewers and men’s rights activists alike hadn’t made the movie out to be some kind of monumental step for womankind. Of course Wonder Woman wouldn’t star an average-looking bulked-up fighter, because they don’t look hot on movie posters. Of course the titular character would sleep with the first man she meets in her entire life, because otherwise people might think an athlete from an all-woman island was a lesbian.

I don’t think many, if any, of the people extolling Wonder Woman’s feminist bona fides believe that supporting the film meant they were supporting feminist causes in any significant way. Warner Bros. is not a nonprofit, and big profits are how big, splashy movies get made. But it’s just so rich to consider that the money it cost to send these little girls who “might make your heart explode” to see Wonder Woman now support the Koch brothers’ efforts to call climate science into question, making it measurably less likely that those little girls will grow up with a livable Earth to inhabit. The price we pay to see a woman kick ass with killer CGI effects is the continued electoral dominance of Koch-funded politicians who want to force women to give birth against their will. It’s no surprise—it’s how the system is designed. It’s what happens when unimaginable wealth is concentrated in the hands of a few white men looking out for themselves and their buddies. It’s called capitalism.

And under capitalism, in case you haven’t heard, there can be no ethical consumption. Every dollar spent in this messed-up marketplace supports exploitation, a fact that’s become even harder to swallow since the Supreme Court’s Citizens United v. FEC decision allowed corporate entities to all but cast physical ballots for their preferred political candidates. The Koch brothers aren’t the first right-wing puppeteers to invest in a corporation that produces a seemingly feminist product, and Wonder Woman is far from the only girl-power movie to enrich men working hard to make the world a harder place for women to thrive.

In fact, one of the last blockbuster action movies with a woman in the leading role, Mad Max: Fury Road, was also funded by RatPac-Dune, the company that bankrolled Wonder Woman. One of the founders of that company, Steven Mnuchin, was the finance chair of Donald Trump’s campaign, donated $425,000 to the campaign and the Republican party to help him win, and now serves as his Treasury Secretary. In other words, if you bought a ticket to see Imperator Furiosa bust the heads of a bunch of sexual abusers, you may have helped America elect one.

Why Marketing ROI Often Misses the Point

by Lisa Nirell @ EnergizeGrowth

It was a crisp fall day in October 2000. I was preparing for a big presentation to the leadership team in Microsoft’s Redmond, WA headquarters. As an outside consultant working for Siebel Systems, I needed to prove myself quickly, and demonstrate that we were generating a solid marketing ROI for them. This was an exciting […]

The post Why Marketing ROI Often Misses the Point appeared first on EnergizeGrowth.

MARKETING SPOTLIGHT: Unilever uses cause marketing with their “Farewell to the Forest” campaign

by iMagiNation2016 @

                                          You may not be familiar with Unilever, but you probably know a few of their 400 international brands like Dove, Lipton, and Q-tips.  They make everything from soap to toilet paper to peanut butter. […]

5 killer stats to start your week

by Leonie Roderick @ Marketing Week

We arm you with all the stats you need to prepare for the coming week and help you understand the big industry trends.

The post 5 killer stats to start your week appeared first on Marketing Week.

How to Tell a Story With Your Marketing

by admin @ Elevate Promo

Everyone loves a good story. Ever since you were a young child, you could sit captivated by a story. Why? A good story makes you feel something, pulling at your emotions. These emotions could be absolutely anything. A marketing campaign should always strive to tell a story. Whether it’s through a video, a blog post, […]

MIFF’s Emotional Trailer from Australia Wins The Best of Global Digital Marketing Awards in April

by Best Marketing @ Best Marketing

Here’s the Top 3 of April 2016:

  1. Melbourne International Film Festival’s Emotional Trailer by McCann Melbourne
  2. KFC’s How KFC Won with China’s Gamers by Mindshare
  3. Tokopedia’s Beyond the Banner by Iris Worldwide Indonesia
Read More…

Advantage Marketing Partners is named a 2017 PROMO Top Shop–joining the ranks of the Top 100 Promotional Marketing Agencies

by Katelyn Stokes @ Advantage Marketing Partners

IRVINE, CA (November 8, 2016) – Advantage Marketing Partners has been named to the 2017 PROMO Top Shops, a listing of the Top 100 U.S. Promotional Marketing Agencies selected by the editors of Chief Marketer. View Advantage Marketing Partners’ 2017 recognition by Chief Marketer here. Advantage Marketing Partners, the marketing division of Advantage Solutions, is a...

The post Advantage Marketing Partners is named a 2017 PROMO Top Shop–joining the ranks of the Top 100 Promotional Marketing Agencies appeared first on Advantage Marketing Partners.

How Cancer Research UK is preparing for GDPR

by Sarah Vizard @ Marketing Week

In the first of a new series on how marketers are approaching the new EU data regulations, we talk to Cancer Research UK about its preparations and the opportunities around GDPR.

The post How Cancer Research UK is preparing for GDPR appeared first on Marketing Week.

BLITZ and Adobe Push the Boundaries of What’s Possible

by Katelyn Stokes @ Advantage Marketing Partners

Los Angeles, CA (October 27, 2016) – BLITZ Agency, a leading digital marketing agency within the Advantage Marketing Partners’ collective, is currently featured on Adobe.com in recognition of their extraordinary, innovative work for and with Adobe and Adobe software. BLITZ has created multiple, groundbreaking, digital installations for Adobe around the world in cities such as...

The post BLITZ and Adobe Push the Boundaries of What’s Possible appeared first on Advantage Marketing Partners.

Dove’s “choose beautiful” campaign reinforces commitment to long term strategy

Dove’s “choose beautiful” campaign reinforces commitment to long term strategy


Five-Minute Marketing

Whether you love Dove or hate them, think they connect well with their target group, or are pirating a cause to hawk their wares, you can’t argue with the consistency or their messaging. Last week …

Fine Vines: Atlanta CMO Annual Social Highlights

by Lisa Nirell @ EnergizeGrowth

What do you get when you blend fun conversation, carefully selected wine pairings, and Balinese cuisine? A recipe for a highly memorable Atlanta CMO Annual Social! We celebrated our first year with our Marketing Leaders of Atlanta charter members. CMOs from QASymphony, Innovergent, Walker & Dunlop, iHealth Innovations, and others participated. Many joined me in sipping some […]

The post Fine Vines: Atlanta CMO Annual Social Highlights appeared first on EnergizeGrowth.

Dove's New Campaign Challenges the 'Perfect Mom' Stereotype

Dove's New Campaign Challenges the 'Perfect Mom' Stereotype


Parents

The message behind the brand's new campaign is that everyone parents differently, and there's no such thing as a "perfect mom."

6 Great Promotion Ideas for LulaRoe Reps

by admin @ Elevate Promo

Social media opens up amazing new opportunities for multi-level-marketing business models. That’s probably why we’re seeing an unprecedented influx of businesses working off of a similar structure as Mary Kay; ground-level consultants offering premium products while working from out of their own homes. One of the most popular MLM businesses in the last five years […]

3 Ways to Use Recipes in Your Marketing

by Roseanne Luth @ Brandingmag

As any marketer for food brands knows, grocery e-commerce is taking off. It was big news when Amazon recently acquired Whole Foods, a move to compete with Walmart. It marks an important shift in the grocery sector, where grocery retailers can no longer rely on either brick-and-mortar stores or e-commerce, but need both. Grocery shopping […]

Stereotypical TV ads ‘causing resentment’ among consumers

by Leonie Roderick @ Marketing Week

TV advertising still relies too heavily on outdated stereotypes, new research suggests.

The post Stereotypical TV ads ‘causing resentment’ among consumers appeared first on Marketing Week.

IN Marketing Awarded PROMO PRO Award for Dove Men Mission: Care Campaign - Advantage Marketing Partners

IN Marketing Awarded PROMO PRO Award for Dove Men Mission: Care Campaign - Advantage Marketing Partners


Advantage Marketing Partners

NORWALK, CT (2014) – IN Marketing received a Bronze PROMO PRO Award for its Dove Men Mission: Care activation at Walmart in the Best In-Store Retail Campaign category. The PRO Awards recognize outstanding promotion marketing campaigns. The awards, now in their 24th year, are the preeminent benchmark for excellence in innovation and creativity that produce stellar results. The winning campaigns were selected by...

The BPM Internship Experience: Drew Rhodes

by admin @ Baer Performance Marketing – Green Bay, WI

My name is Drew Rhodes, and I was this summer’s Baer Performance Marketing “intern extraordinaire.” I attend St. Norbert College in De Pere. I am pursuing a degree in Business Administration with an emphasis in marketing and economics. I have three semesters left before I graduate. In that time, I will be playing football for […]

The post The BPM Internship Experience: Drew Rhodes appeared first on Baer Performance Marketing - Green Bay, WI.

Bruketa&Žinić OM rebrands to Bruketa&Žinić&Grey

by Gašper @ Marketing magazin

As official press release states, “agency Establishes Itself as a Brand, Product & Retail Design Hub, and a Digital Shopper Hub For the Grey Group Global Network”. The management team from now on  consists of Co-Chairmen and Chief Creative Officers, Nikola Žinić and Davor Bruketa with Siniša Waldinger as Executive Creative Director, Damjan Geber as CEO […]

The post Bruketa&Žinić OM rebrands to Bruketa&Žinić&Grey appeared first on Marketing magazin.

How Halo Remains Relevant Over A Decade After Its Debut

by Benjamin Leong @ Word-of-Mouth and Referral Marketing Blog

How Halo 5’s advertisements smashed into the Top 1% of all iTunes tracks — 14 years after Halo first debuted Ah, Halo. The first Halo game was launched on Xbox in 2001, but the franchise is still going strong 14 years on with the 2015 release of Halo 5. Their branding was so wildly successful that as […]

The post How Halo Remains Relevant Over A Decade After Its Debut appeared first on Word-of-Mouth and Referral Marketing Blog.

How Rolex Maintains Its Status as One of the Most Valuable Brands in the World

by Monique Danao @ Word-of-Mouth and Referral Marketing Blog

Rolex has a lot of history. Its watches and timepieces have been worn by the most influential icons in the world. Its been a constant companion of  world leaders, celebrities and influencers. So, it’s always been associated with status and prestige. But how has the luxury brand maintained its place at the top, for more […]

The post How Rolex Maintains Its Status as One of the Most Valuable Brands in the World appeared first on Word-of-Mouth and Referral Marketing Blog.

What Do Rick Ross and Mike Pence Have in Common? An Inability to Platonically Interact With Distracting Women

What Do Rick Ross and Mike Pence Have in Common? An Inability to Platonically Interact With Distracting Women

by Christina Cauterucci @ The XX Factor

Noted gentleman Rick Ross appeared on a New York radio show Monday morning to promote his new VH1 reality series Signed. In the series, he and two other hip-hop moguls will audition and develop aspiring artists, who will get the chance to sign with one of the three big dogs’ record labels.

“When I’m looking for an artist, I’m really just looking for something I’ve never seen, first and foremost,” Ross told the Breakfast Club radio hosts on Monday. “If it’s something that’s unique, I feel that’s something that’s in demand. After that, I want to see that hunger.”

But what if that unique, in-demand, hungry young artist is a woman? As Breakfast Club host Angela Yee pointed out, Ross’s Maybach Music Group label has no female artists on its current roster and has only ever signed one, singer-songwriter Teedra Moses. Ross shared his well-thought-out reasoning with Yee. “You know, I never did it because I always thought I would end up fucking the female rapper and fucking the business up,” he said.

“That’s awful,” Yee replied.

“I’m so focused on my business. I got to be honest with you,” Ross went on. “You know, she looking good. I’m spending so much money on her photo shoots. I got to fuck her couple times.”

What a conscientious businessman! If you cannot interact with women without having sex with them and losing your focus on moneymaking, the responsible thing to do, Ross says, is avoid contact with women in the first place.

It is exhausting to imagine the life of a man who sees every female colleague and industry contemporary as a predestined sex partner. How do you have any time for artist development, business strategy, and radio-show appearances if you’re constantly having sex, scheming about how to have sex, or being distracted by people who, because they are women, remind you of sex? How do you sit through dinner with a buddy and his sister? How do you handle meetings with female marketing executives and record distribution heads while maintaining a constant erection? How much does your life suck because you can’t have any female friends?

Those are questions many posed to Vice President Mike Pence earlier this year, when it came out that the guy refuses to break bread alone with any women who aren’t his wife. The famously chaste ‘n’ Catholic Pence initially comes off as the anti-Ross: The rapper’s promiscuity is as much a hallmark of his brand as the vice president’s condemnation of almost every type of sexual contact is a hallmark of his. One thinks you should almost never have sex, the other thinks yachtloads of sex is the way life was meant to be lived.

But these two men are a lot alike. Ross has women call him “Daddy”; Pence calls his wife “Mother.” Both are gatekeepers at the top of their respective industries. And both use their warped, semi-Biblical views of women as inevitable temptresses to keep non-men out of their inner circles. To Pence, all women—no matter how random or disinterested—represent potential detriment to his marriage. To Ross, they are poison to his business. Women already face significant structural barriers to advancement in politics and the music industry. Men like Ross and Pence, who explicitly limit their contact with women, codify sexist notions of women as sex objects who divert attention from the important work at hand. (See also: dress codes that force underage girls into bulkier clothing because their bodies are burdensome distractions for innocent, hardworking boys.)

Ross continued his Monday interview by asking Yee several times to reveal her legs to him, implying that he would have to have sex with her if she signed with his label, telling her he wants to see her twerk at an upcoming pool party, and posing for a photo while grabbing her hair and pretending to lick her face. If his goal was to keep distracting women out of the music industry—or broadcast journalism, for that matter—Ross can count this interview as a major win.

The Best of Global Digital Marketing in Colombo, Sri Lanka

by Best Marketing @ Best Marketing

October 2016 In cooperation with Sri Lanka Institute of Marketing (SLIM) More information coming soon!

24 Questions to Clear Innovation Clutter

by Lisa Nirell @ EnergizeGrowth

What contributes to marketing overwhelm (other than the 7,000 products on the martech chart)? Overstuffed calendars. They create marketing innovation clutter, which hampers growth and competitive relevance. How crowded is your calendar? Among our CMO communities, the predominant cause of marketing innovation resistance is self-inflicted overwhelm. It’s insidious. I have found that it’s usually triggered […]

The post 24 Questions to Clear Innovation Clutter appeared first on EnergizeGrowth.

Dove vs. Axe: Hypocrisy or Good Marketing?

Dove vs. Axe: Hypocrisy or Good Marketing?


Beyond Marketing

Have you seen these commercials? Dove Real Beauty Campaign: Evolution The Axe Effect Commercial The Criticism From their research, Dove found that only 2 percent of women describe themselves as &#8…

International round-up: Coca-Cola’s new corporate campaign, Uber sues mobile agency

by Marketing Week Reporters @ Marketing Week

Coca-Cola looks to make its corporate brand about more than just Coke Coca-Cola has launched a new corporate branding campaign in the US that aims to portray it as a “total beverage company” and shift the focus away from its most famous product. The spots, which are airing on US TV, feature a wide range […]

The post International round-up: Coca-Cola’s new corporate campaign, Uber sues mobile agency appeared first on Marketing Week.

Apple, GDPR, Nespresso: 5 things you need to know this week and why

by Sarah Vizard @ Marketing Week

Catch up with all the week's news including the launch of the premium iPhone X, Nespresso's first sustainability campaign and Facebook's new ad controls.

The post Apple, GDPR, Nespresso: 5 things you need to know this week and why appeared first on Marketing Week.

How Dove Empowered Real Women And Achieved Success in 80+ Countries - Word-of-Mouth and Referral Marketing Blog

How Dove Empowered Real Women And Achieved Success in 80+ Countries - Word-of-Mouth and Referral Marketing Blog


Word-of-Mouth and Referral Marketing Blog

Dove is a personal care brand owned by Unilever originating in the United Kingdom, whose products are sold in more than 80 countries and are offered for both women and men. The company was slow to take off with a lack of global identity and a decentralized product. There wasn’t much of a corporate strategy …

Best Cause Marketing Examples | Successful Campaigns

Best Cause Marketing Examples | Successful Campaigns


CauseGood

These best-in-class cause marketing examples are sure provide you the inspiration you need to launch a successful campaign of your own.

Good Campaign of the Week: Saatchi & Saatchi “Open Your Eyes”

by D&AD @ Brandingmag

Gender equality may be a subject that’s on everyone’s minds in 2017, however, a new film directed Jake Dypka through Indy8, invites viewers to actually see a gender divide, through clever use of videography. “Open your eyes”, which debuted at Saatchi & Saatchi New Directors’ Showcase in June, examines stereotypes projected onto young boys and […]

Hack your commute: Don’t buy into brain training

by Michael Barnett @ Marketing Week

Marketing Week’s ‘Hack your commute’ series uncovers inspiring and fulfilling ways to spend your journeys to and from work that will expand your mind and broaden your horizons.

The post Hack your commute: Don’t buy into brain training appeared first on Marketing Week.

Jumpstart Your Business By Joining These 31 Amazing Facebook Groups

by Si Quan Ong @ Word-of-Mouth and Referral Marketing Blog

Do you know where you can find a whole tribe of people who dress like you, walk like you, talk and act like you? Yes, you probably guessed right. Facebook Groups. (And bonus hi-5 if you caught that Slim Shady reference.) Facebook Groups are a perfect platform for you to meet like-minded people who are […]

The post Jumpstart Your Business By Joining These 31 Amazing Facebook Groups appeared first on Word-of-Mouth and Referral Marketing Blog.

Dove takes its 'Real Beauty' marketing drive to India

Dove takes its 'Real Beauty' marketing drive to India


CosmeticsDesign-Asia.com

Skin care brand Dove has enjoyed strong success over the years for its ‘Real Beauty’ marketing, and is now pushing focus on this campaign within India.

John Lewis puts focus on social media with 360 ad trial and new hire

by Thomas Hobbs @ Marketing Week

The retailer is hiring for a new head of brand and social marketing role as it looks to differentiate its retail experience and invest in the brand.

The post John Lewis puts focus on social media with 360 ad trial and new hire appeared first on Marketing Week.

Are You Taking a Casual Approach to Marketing?

by admin @ Elevate Promo

Are you taking a casual approach to your marketing? Maybe your brand has all the standard social media platforms, for example, but you aren’t using those platforms to their full potential in order to engage your followers. Or, maybe you have a customer service policy set in place, only to fall short in really taking […]

On-demand webinar: Are You Set Up for ABM Success? What to Know Before You Go.

by Katie Martell @ THE BLOG -

Yesterday I had the opportunity to present a live webinar with Jon Russo, founder of marketing performance firm B2BFusion.

Jon is often a voice of clarity to me in what has become a complex world of marketing and sales technology. Choosing the right vendor is enough of a challenge, but making systems work to their full potential is another story.

What's more, making tech work together in stacks can be a major challenge preventing organizations from seeing value in their investments. 

I asked Jon to present his worldview working with clients to find success with ABM tools. Watch the free, on-demand recording of our event, below. One-time registration is required (but is soooo worth it, trust me.)

Are You Set Up for ABM Success? What to Know Before You Go.

Account-Based Marketing tools like Engagio, DemandBase, and Terminus are powerful, exciting pieces of technology. But without the right data and decisions in place, it's like putting really nice shutters on a house without a foundation.

B2B companies must be thoughtful about their ABM setup. 

Join Katie Martell, on-demand B2B marketer, and Jon Russo, B2B marketing operations expert and high-tech CMO as they walk through EXACTLY what companies need to get these tools to work. They'll share a real-life example of how to wrangle data and MAP/CRM integrations to get up and running with account-based strategies. 

Everyone's on a journey with ABM, but some are in different places than others. This session is ideal for anyone who's interested in getting started with ABM, who has bought an ABM tool and wants to improve their implementation, or who wants to see more value from their investment in ABM.

Dove Real Beauty Sketches – best marketing campaign of the century?

by Gaby Atkinson @ Formedia | PR - Marketing - Design - Web » Formedia | PR - Marketing - Design - Web |

Who would have thought that a brand which primarily sells toiletries, could deliver a promotion that arguably wins the title of best viral campaign?   Dove: how to build a brand In 2004, international cosmetic brand, Dove, launched its Real Beauty campaign, aiming to empower...

Don't tweet mean things about celebrities on Oscars night — Dove will come after you

Don't tweet mean things about celebrities on Oscars night — Dove will come after you


Business Insider

Dove's #SpeakBeautiful aims to change the way people talk about body image on social media.

Influencer Marketing 101

by admin @ Elevate Promo

Marketing is constantly evolving. It can be hard to keep up with the most effective ways to market you and your products to current and potential customers. One new aspect of marketing is becoming more popular and it looks like it’s here to stay: Influencer Marketing. What is Influencer marketing? Ten years ago, everyone looked […]

The Body Shop on how its new owners are trying to revive its ‘activist spirit’

by Thomas Hobbs @ Marketing Week

The cosmetics retailer admits it strayed too far away from being a purpose-driven business under the previous ownership but is looking to turn that around with a new mobile-driven campaign.

The post The Body Shop on how its new owners are trying to revive its ‘activist spirit’ appeared first on Marketing Week.

Deliciously Ella on her ‘unusual’ approach to marketing

by Michael Barnett @ Marketing Week

Food writer and entrepreneur Ella Mills started Deliciously Ella back in 2012, and it has since grown into a multimillion pound brand. Here she shares the secrets to her success and the role marketing has played.

The post Deliciously Ella on her ‘unusual’ approach to marketing appeared first on Marketing Week.

Is the way you track conversions damaging your campaigns?

by Tina Desai @ Marketing Week

One of the biggest challenges in marketing over recent years has been tracking the value and efficacy of campaigns. Focusing on last-click conversions could be significantly damaging our marketing - but not in the way you think.

The post Is the way you track conversions damaging your campaigns? appeared first on Marketing Week.

Creating a Business Card That Gets Noticed

by admin @ Baer Performance Marketing – Green Bay, WI

Blog post by: Sarah Schrader, Baer Performance Marketing’s Social Media & Creative Specialist You have a stack of business cards you received from people you worked with or met at a networking event, but you most likely won’t keep them all (especially if a card doesn’t stand out or you didn’t make a connection with […]

The post Creating a Business Card That Gets Noticed appeared first on Baer Performance Marketing - Green Bay, WI.

Trump’s Evangelical Adviser Says God’s OK With “Taking Out” Kim Jong-Un

Trump’s Evangelical Adviser Says God’s OK With “Taking Out” Kim Jong-Un

by Ruth Graham @ The XX Factor

What’s the only thing more frightening than an unstable man with the nuclear codes? A unstable man who is being told that God himself has given his blessing to push the big red button.

On Tuesday, President Trump said North Korea would “be met with fire and fury like the world has never seen” if it continued to threaten the United States. Soon afterward, an evangelical adviser to the president released a statement saying that God has given Trump authority to “take out” North Korean leader Kim Jong-un. “When it comes to how we should deal with evil doers, the Bible, in the book of Romans, is very clear,” Robert Jeffress, pastor of a Southern Baptist megachurch in Dallas, said in a statement given to the Christian Broadcasting Network. “God has endowed rulers full power to use whatever means necessary—including war—to stop evil. In the case of North Korea, God has given Trump authority to take out Kim Jong-Un.”

Jeffress, who was one of Trump’s earliest and loudest evangelical supporters during the 2016 campaign, later tweeted praise for the president’s reliability and predictability:

In a follow-up interview with the Washington Post, Jeffress elaborated that he was referring to Romans 13, which includes a passage on how Christians should relate to political authorities. The passage says that government authorities have been installed by God, and a ruler is the “servant of God to execute wrath on the wrongdoer.” In Jeffress’ interpretation, that gives leaders freedom “to do whatever, whether it’s assassination, capital punishment or evil punishment to quell the actions of evildoers like Kim Jong Un.”

Christian media outlets regularly cover the plight of the estimated 300,000 Christians in North Korea, where citizens are required to worship the Kim family and other religious practices are banned. The latest issue of the conservative evangelical magazine World, for example, features a long reported story on efforts by Christian defectors to draw attention to human rights abuses in their home country. (On Wednesday, North Korea released a Canadian pastor who had been sentenced to life imprisonment in 2015 on charges of using religion to overthrow Kim’s government.)

It’s one thing to pay close attention to religious persecution in a totalitarian nation. It’s another thing to give a confident thumbs-up to nuclear war, especially since many Christian groups have long been on the forefront of the anti-nuclear movement. (Catholic groups have arguably been the most consistently outspoken.) But evangelist Billy Graham, an influential spiritual adviser to American presidents starting with Harry Truman, also called the end of the nuclear arms race his “No. 1 social concern” in the early 1980s and set off on a college speaking tour about the need for disarmament.

But times have changed, and now evangelicals such as Jeffress have the president’s ear. Before last year, Jeffress was best known nationally for his occasional pronouncements on topics like the satanic origins of Mormonism, Catholicism, and Islam. Jeffress was a member of Trump’s evangelical advisory board during the campaign and appeared with Trump several times at rallies, reassuring attendees that the thrice-married casino mogul would be a “true friend” to evangelicals as president. He preached at a private ceremony for the Trump family before the inauguration, and he has been a frequent visitor to the White House since then. Last month, his church’s large choir performed an original song titled “Make America Great Again” at the Celebrate Freedom Rally in Washington. Trump apparently loved it.

Jeffress’ statement about North Korea makes clear that he is not claiming to have received a new revelation from God that Trump should go after Kim. These days, that counts as reassuring news. Rather, the pastor is offering a controversial interpretation of a tricky piece of scripture he sees as applicable to the current moment. Still, in order to argue that God has granted political authorities the right to do evil to combat evil, he has to brush away significant other chunks of the New Testament. Romans 12—the chapter just before the one Jeffress cites—explicitly commands readers not to repay evil with evil. Jeffress brushed that off to the Post, saying the command applies only to Christian individuals, not governments. And what about Jesus’ sermon in which he sweepingly upends traditional hierarchies in order to elevate the meek, the merciful, and the peacemakers? “A Christian writer asked me, ‘Don’t you want the president to embody the Sermon on the Mount?’ ” Jeffress told the Post. “I said absolutely not.”

4 Essentials of Startup Branding from The Ad Club’s 2017 Brandathon

4 Essentials of Startup Branding from The Ad Club’s 2017 Brandathon

by Katie Martell @ THE BLOG -

What happens when ten Boston-area startups meet ten of Boston’s best creative agencies?

 

Brandathon, that’s what.

 

The Ad Club President Kathy Kiely admitted in her opening, “we’re not supposed to pick favorites… but this is our favorite event.”

 

And I totally get it.

 

This event checks every box. It’s a pure celebration of the sheer work that goes into brand building, the creativity behind well-loved marketing ideas, and the strategy and research required to deliver a message that is both relevant and remarkable.

 

But, perhaps the most entertaining piece of this evening is the art of the agency pitch.

 

Imagine if Don Draper had access to Photoshop and embedded .gifs in PowerPoint slides. Then, add puns. Brandathon’s audience is given front-row access to see the type of performances that win these agencies global name-brand accounts. A truly remarkable experience.

 

This annual Ad Club event (now in its fourth year) includes 10 marketing teams who work for 72 hours to develop a new brand for 10 of Boston’s most promising startups.

 

It’s a coveted position to be in, as evidenced by the swell of applicants this year. 150 companies applied for ten spots. These startups, many lacking dedicated marketing resources of their own, know the competitive advantage of a strong and well-conceived brand.

 

For example, a 2016 Brandathon startup Tranquilo took the new branding work developed by 36creative all the way to Shark Tank, ending up with a deal from Robert Herjavec, and going on to grow “from 5 figures to 7 figures in less than a year” according to CEO and founder Melissa Gersin.

 

This year, Arnold took the top spot for a hilarious rebrand of Kulisha chicken feed. (Yes, really, chicken feed.) In second place was 36creative for their work with OatShop, and finally, Genuine Interactive secured third place for their meaningful revival of CommonWealth Kitchen.

 

 

 

Other participating startups this year included WA11.ST, HipChip, Janji, Nomsly, Sheprd, and Solstice, receiving new brand design and ideas from creative teams including Forge Worldwide, GPJ Experience Marketing, Racepoint Global, SapientRazorfish, Small Army, and W-9.

 

This was a night of creativity and humor, but also a reminder of startup branding basics:

 

1. Branding goes beyond packaging

 

When you think of branding, you may consider a website, logo, business cards, and of course the packaging a product may come in. But, we were reminded this evening that a brand is truly comprised of all the touchpoints a customer may have with an organization.

 

Agencies tonight presented each startup with ideas to bring their brand recommendations to life far beyond the initial website or package design, well into the lifecycle of a customer. Many entrepreneurs forget to consider that their brand is the sum of an experience a buyer has from before the purchase to after the sale, not only the wrapper to their product.

 

2. Customer-centric branding wins

 

Many startups describe what it is that they do in terms of the products or technology they provide.

 

But, as each brand makeover demonstrated, product-centric branding is only so effective. When a startup is ready to for real growth, their brand must reflect customer-centric ideals.

 

This begins with the audience being served, and working backwards to design an identity and a message that speaks directly to them - in their language, and addressing their problems, first.

 

3. Simple and approachable is best

 

For many of these startups, the biggest change to their original messaging came in the form of simplification.

 

These agencies know through their work with consumer brands worldwide that less is often more, especially when a consumer is faced with a new brand for the first time. Buyers (and all humans for that matter) make a split-second judgement call. That moment of truth is where the power of a good brand comes into play - and where the danger of complex, confusing branding creates problems.

 

Throughout the evening we saw taglines shortened, websites streamlined, and jargon/buzzwords banished. Each agency helped to make their startup clients more approachable, their mission and value clear, and their relevance to the buyer easy to understand.

 

4. Startups need a cohesive brand narrative

 

Many startups will cobble together their initial attempts at branding using an affordably-made logo, accessible Wordpress template, and whatever free stock imagery they can access. (Resourcefulness is the name of the game for early-stage businesses, right?) But for those companies seeking to grow, a cohesive brand narrative is a paramount component of building a business.

 

Each pitch tonight featured a narrative that reflected the brand’s founding story, values, personality, beliefs, and identity. The art of articulating all of this in a set of imagery, colors, and copy is exactly what makes this profession so difficult - and what made each pitch so impressive.

 

---

 

Brandathon 2017 was special - the energy and passion of both brands and agencies were on full display. Nearly every startup here knew the biggest problem they faced in this nascent stage of their businesses was creating awareness, and for each of them, a cohesive brand is an invaluable gift, as it serves as a launch pad for all future growth.

 

Diane Hessan, Brandathon Committee Chairperson summarized it best, sharing in her introduction, "when I founded my own company, the idea that I could have this level of access to the great, creative agencies of Boston was simply incomprehensible.”

 

This was an event that really could have only happened here in Boston, reflecting this city’s unique mix of entrepreneurial strength and world-class marketing fortitude.

See you in 2018.



 

Five tips to earn FREE publicity (#4 is your secret weapon!)

by Mary Charleson @ Five-Minute Marketing

This week our theme is earned media. It’s certainly a topic dear to my heart (filling an entire module in my course “Marketing with Media: Spend less time, get more results”) But the reason I want to share some tips is because several of you have asked about it in sessions this week, and I […]

Critics Aren’t Taking Issue With the Content of Hillary Clinton’s New Book So Much as Its Right to Exist

Critics Aren’t Taking Issue With the Content of Hillary Clinton’s New Book So Much as Its Right to Exist

by Christina Cauterucci @ The XX Factor

There is no one who loves talking about the 2016 election more than Donald Trump, who brings it up in public more than once a week on average. There is no one so keen to linger over the outcome of Election Day, to pick at old grudges, and dress down old opponents than Trump. No one, some prominent Democrats would have you believe, other than Hillary Clinton.

“I love Hillary,” Sen. Al Franken recently told Yahoo News. “I think she has a right to analyze what happened. But we do have to move on.” On the Late Show, Sen. Bernie Sanders reminded Clinton that she “ran against the most unpopular candidate in the history of this country” and still couldn’t eke out a win. “She was upset about it and I understand that,” Sanders said. “But our job is not to go backward. ... I think it’s a little bit silly to keep talking about 2016.”

Given that 2016 saw an unprecedented electoral upset that resulted in the least-qualified president in U.S. history, nine months seems an awfully short grace period for acceptable discourse on the outcome. And Clinton isn’t just talking about the worst setback of her professional life—she’s selling it. What Happened, her highly anticipated 494-page postmortem on her last campaign, hits bookstores on Tuesday, ensuring that the conversation some Democrats don’t want to have will continue for at least as long as Clinton’s book tour.

Early reviews take issue with the book’s right to exist as much as the quality of its contents. “Was this book necessary?” asks Doyle McManus in the lede of his Los Angeles Times review, suggesting that Clinton should have shoved her manuscript into a desk drawer rather than offer it up for public consumption. Doug Schoen, a former Clinton ally, told the failed candidate in a Hill piece that it is “time to exit the stage” and stop doing harm to her political party by simply showing up. “Friends don’t let friends read Hillary Clinton’s new book,” wrote a critic at the Week who refused to even crack it open before making her judgment. “Whatever you want to read this book for, chances are, there’s something else that does it better.”

Conservative media outlets show particular glee in their reporting that Clinton’s book will ravage the Democratic Party and her own future in politics. The world is “sick of hearing from her,” writes Katherine Timpf at the National Review, calling it a feat of “self-indulgent dead-horse-beating” and the product of a “selfish urge to present as many excuses as you can to absolve yourself of any blame for your embarrassing defeat.” In the Washington Times, Ben Wolfgang argues that “the American people simply don’t want to hear from [Clinton],” quoting a poli-sci professor who believes Clinton should have “not written a book and been quiet for another eight months.”

That Washington Times piece calls What Happened a “blame book”—and certainly, most assessments of the tome are preoccupied with the question of blame. The juiciest excerpts so far are those that find Clinton casting shade on Sanders (he emboldened Trump’s attacks and promised every American a free pony), James Comey (he “shivved” her and “badly overstepped his bounds”), the New York Times (it dragged her over her emails but glossed over Trump–Russia connections during the campaign). But the bigger question with which critics are grappling is whether or not Clinton claims enough blame for her own unexpected loss. “Despite seemingly suggesting the fault is hers alone, Clinton also clearly believes that a lot of other people are responsible, too,” writes Bess Levin in her Vanity Fair roundup of “People Clinton Blames for Her Election Loss.” Another Washington Times piece reported that What Happened is “yet another campaign to blame everybody she can for her crushing loss.” Schoen wrote that “the only person [Clinton] does not seem to blame is herself.” Even the Associated Press claimed in a straight news piece about the book that Clinton “has a reputation for avoiding blame for her failures.” It seems that these critics, unsatisfied with Clinton’s concession speech, are holding out for a full-blown apology.

But Clinton could hardly have been more explicit about where the buck stopped in her campaign. “I go back over my own shortcomings and the mistakes we made,” she writes in one oft-quoted excerpt. “I take responsibility for all of them. You can blame the data, blame the message, blame anything you want—but I was the candidate. It was my campaign. Those were my decisions.” There it is: Clinton blaming herself for her loss. If that’s where her critics would have rather she stopped, What Happened would have been a PR statement, not a book.

It's true that the democracy-defying 2016 election merits more than a five-sentence mea culpa from the woman who lost. Clinton as a bad candidate is just one sliver of the rancid pie that caused America to vomit up President Trump. Even the election analyses most critical of Clinton don’t dare place all the blame on her Wall Street speeches, email-management missteps, or comments about putting coal companies out of business. The additional facts she offers as contributing factors to her loss—Sanders’ “attacks caused lasting damage”; sexism helped make her “a lightning rod for fury”—are measured and probably true. They’re nothing readers haven’t encountered before in the thousands of thinkpieces they devoured in the months after the election. Almost nobody thinks Hillary Clinton alone is responsible for the defeat that shocked the entire world.

When Clinton acknowledges that truth, as she does in What Happened, critics portray her as a petty shirker of accountability. Democratic Rep. Jared Huffman of California told Politico that Clinton is forcing the party to endure endless “media cycles about the blame game, and the excuses.” In a recent Morning Consult poll, 39 percent of 2,000 respondents said Hillary Clinton should cease all influence on the Democratic Party. Just 40 percent said it would be OK for her to write books. That the public was asked to weigh in on the seemliness of Clinton’s post-election plans is itself a marker of how personally the country takes her every move, as if she were not a politician but a despised national mascot.

What if, just like much of the rest of the electorate, she’s simply looking to make meaning out of an event that shattered her illusions about the country she calls home? The 2016 election was unlike any other: Nearly a year after the election, conversations with my friends and colleagues still occasionally end up in “what happened?” territory. Ordinary people are still piecing the 2016 narrative together. It’s no surprise that they might want to hear the loser’s perspective, even if members of her party don’t.

Real Beauty? Measuring the Dove Marketing Program's Success

Real Beauty? Measuring the Dove Marketing Program's Success


EnergizeGrowth

More than 10 years after its debut, the Dove Real Beauty program remains a marketing icon and a source of controversy. What did it accomplish?

Apple gambles on premium iPhone X but should its rivals be worried?

by Thomas Hobbs @ Marketing Week

The launch of the $999 iPhone X has been labeled a PR success, but is it really the 'biggest leap' since the original iPhone?

The post Apple gambles on premium iPhone X but should its rivals be worried? appeared first on Marketing Week.

5 Tips for Starting Your Internship off Right

by admin @ Baer Performance Marketing – Green Bay, WI

Applying for an internship? Smart decision! College internships help students develop valuable professional contacts and are a powerful addition to any resume. It will show you have experience in a specific field and that you put in the extra effort to gain this experience by juggling the position with school. With that in mind, there […]

The post 5 Tips for Starting Your Internship off Right appeared first on Baer Performance Marketing - Green Bay, WI.

Dove Campaigns

Dove Campaigns


Dove US

Learn more about Dove campaigns here and watch your favorite videos from Real Beauty Sketches to Choose Beautiful.

The Best of Global Digital Marketing in Taipei, Taiwan

by Best Marketing @ Best Marketing

9th December 2016 

Mothers criticise Baby Dove adverts

Mothers criticise Baby Dove adverts


BBC News

Dozens complain to the watchdog about the campaign which some say is against breastfeeding in public.

Building Your Business Online Through Referrals and Recommendations

by admin @ Baer Performance Marketing – Green Bay, WI

Blog post by: Drew Rhodes, Baer Performance Marketing Intern   Relationships in business mean everything, and today, technology can further build and strengthen those relationships. Consumers are placing an increasing amount of trust in what they read online. First impressions are being made through profile pictures and social media advertising, and after a quick peek […]

The post Building Your Business Online Through Referrals and Recommendations appeared first on Baer Performance Marketing - Green Bay, WI.

Twitter CEO promises overhaul of ‘clunky’ ad offering

by Sarah Vizard @ Marketing Week

Twitter's boss Jack Dorsey admits the platform hasn't done enough to differentiate its ad product or prove to advertisers that it works.

The post Twitter CEO promises overhaul of ‘clunky’ ad offering appeared first on Marketing Week.

Bonus Videos: Overcoming Marketing Innovation Anxiety

by Lisa Nirell @ EnergizeGrowth

What is marketing innovation anxiety? It happens when we keep postponing innovation conversations and initiatives. Unfortunately, in Western cultures, most of us believe that looking busy is a badge of honor, so we default to the familiar—managing our daily problem inbox. My curiosity around marketing innovation anxiety, and the lack of a true commitment to […]

The post Bonus Videos: Overcoming Marketing Innovation Anxiety appeared first on EnergizeGrowth.

Should your brand launch a youth sub-brand?

by Leonie Roderick @ Marketing Week

More companies are launching sub-brands to appeal to a younger demographic, but they would be wise to take a look at the parent brand instead.

The post Should your brand launch a youth sub-brand? appeared first on Marketing Week.

Did 13 of Last Year’s Marketing Industry Predictions Come True? Let’s Find Out

Did 13 of Last Year’s Marketing Industry Predictions Come True? Let’s Find Out

by Katie Martell @ THE BLOG -

Happy New Year. For aud lang syne and all that.

We are well beyond that beautiful limbo of the holiday season, an inevitable opportunity for us as individuals to pause and look back on the previous 12 months.

Maybe there’s a tinge of regret (they are teachable moments), glimmers of brilliance, and hopefully buckets of pride in what we’ve achieved.

In the marketing industry, like all others being changed by technology, this time of year that falls at the end of calendar Q4 and beginning of Q1 is when we make predictions.

Collective groan.

Don’t get me wrong, I love prediction pieces! They have kind of become an industry norm – something every blog and publication tends to run. Many are super helpful expert-POV that help us make sense of the change.

Running a quick Google search will reveal hundreds of articles.

Most often, these predictions are a hugely optimistic look at the months ahead, and a really compelling benchmark - like a time capsule - as to where we are collectively the very moment the calendar year (human construct of time, human construct of time, human construct of time) comes to an end.

In the hype race, customers are left behind.

Now, if you’re situated comfortably within the marketing corner office of a marketing tech vendor (or more likely in a funky open office setting, you know, with the plebians) your predictions likely centralize around whatever it is that you’re selling.

Widget vendor? 2017 is undoubtedly the year of the widget.

If you’re in the media, you’re likely writing or being assigned stories that fall into the greater narrative of the tech industry. (Writing about “AI in marketing” this year? Yeah, you.)

We all know the dangers of hype.

Too often, executives who are making predictions try too hard to… well… sound like they can predict the future. Yes, we should all seek to be thought leaders, on the bleeding edge of our industry, ahead of the game, yadda yadda yadda. But what’s happened in many fields, especially marketing, is a bit of a race that’s getting out of control.

Vendors rush ahead to be innovative (or sound innovative). Our customers can barely keep up. Fast-forward 12 months and it’s time for another set of high-level, pie in the sky predictions that very few practitioners are ready to take advantage of.

Where is the customer in the maturity and adoption of these tactics? Who are you writing for?

They’re still trying to implement 2013’s predictions. Some are stuck in 2009. It’s not their fault, it’s the pace of change that is far more difficult to implement than the time it takes to write a thinkpiece on the future of their industries.

We are really not helping anyone with hundreds of pieces about what’s to come in the year ahead that are grounded in truth only realized by early-adopters, or worse, grounded in fiction.

So, I thought it would be fun to do a brief sanity-check of last year’s predictions. See how right our fortune teller industry luminaries really are.

Note: this is done in jest. I don’t mean to call anyone out, in fact I came across quite a few folks that I know and love and have left all names off my piece.

Let’s get into it: 13 Marketing Industry Predictions from 2016 – Did They Come True?

1.    Digital Marketing will Cease as Marketers Shift to Marketing in a Digital World - Forbes

Forget digital, we’re so digital we’re not even digital anymore.

2.    The Era of Cognitive Commerce has Begun – Forbes

Spoken like a guy who works for a cognitive business technology company, oh wait, he does (IBM).

3.    Real-Time Marketing Analytics will Unite Online and Offline Behavior for Richer Lead Scoring and Nurturing in 2016 – Forbes

I know the predictor behind this one, and he’s a smart cookie. This one is getting closer to the truth, as it hopes phone activities from sales will be included in lead scoring. Also, he works at a company selling insights around phone activity. Moving on.

4.    The arrival of Virtual Reality, combined with a major explosion of streaming and the death of old world distribution models will unleash a new age of what we used to call “TV” – Forbes, and this article too

Oooh a new age. I think ages, by definition, take a few years to shake out, so why don’t we check back on this one in a couple of decades.

5.    Being Human Will Return to Marketing / Getting Back to Basics Will Trump the Sexy, Shiny, New Marketing Vehicle – Forbes

Now these guys are speaking my language. Are these predictions? Or is this a cop out? The jury is out…

6.    The Maturation of Addressable Communications will Advance Across Channels – Forbes

I will take bread with this buzzword soup, yes, thank you. Mmm, delicious.

7.    Intent-based Marketing Has Become a Reality – Forbes

Hello my friend! This predictor is also a very smart marketer who I love and respect. Three guesses what his firm sells.

8.    By the end of 2016, CMOs will no longer present slideware to show their impact on revenue in board meetings– Forbes

Down with PPT!! Right after I finish editing next week's board slides.

9.    In the same Forbes article, there’s one about the importance of data-driven marketing, from a marketing data vendor.

10. Another about sales and marketing alignment from a sales enablement technology vendor. And on it goes.

11. In content marketing, this article predicts live streaming will skyrocket in popularity (I do see a lot more of it from brands. I can’t yet find data on its usage but suppose this is closer to reality.)

12. It also speaks to the rise of personal authority over brand authority – something I harp on with my own clients. I’m behind this one.

13. This one predicts “brand/product/marketing/sales and CS teams will reorganize around innovation and customer experience”—again, let’s check back on that one in a few years. I love the spirit of this, but this one will take a while to shake out. Re-orgs take time…

Looking back, thinking ahead.

Look, while this article is done in the name of fun, I do hope it tempers next year’s slew of prediction pieces back to a pace that both positions your company as an innovative leader in your space, while addressing the real problems faced by your customers.

Otherwise, practitioners are sitting on the train, reading your piece on their phones, thinking “wow. My peers are so much farther along than me.” The truth is, most are not. It’s an illusion.

Speak to where customers are today, while painting a bright future for what they could have tomorrow. This will have more impact than lofty predictions.

In marketing, we can’t afford to be so full of BS about the future of our space. It’s become a joke.

Founders, you don’t need to always fake the illusion that you are somehow light years ahead of the market. No, investors don’t want to hear it. They know the companies that build billion-dollar industries are solving an addressable market problem, at the moment of need, with an eye to what’s to come.  

Next time you write a prediction for the year ahead, do a quick gut check.

Now... where’s the champagne? I’m still celebrating.

Article originally appeared on LinkedIn.

Public Health England wants to make its brand ‘part of the fabric of society’

by Leonie Roderick @ Marketing Week

The government health body is changing its strategy as it looks to take its “tools out of the marketing world and into everyday interactions with the health system”.

The post Public Health England wants to make its brand ‘part of the fabric of society’ appeared first on Marketing Week.

Named #1 Ad Agency by OC Business Journal

by ampdev @ Advantage Marketing Partners

Advantage Marketing Partners tops this year’s list of Ad Agencies in Orange County, as ranked by The Orange County Business Journal. Forty-seven local agencies were named to this year’s list based on annual revenue size, with Advantage Marketing Partners and the #2 agency making up 56% of the annual revenue across all agencies. Additional accolades...

The post Named #1 Ad Agency by OC Business Journal appeared first on Advantage Marketing Partners.

Advantage Marketing Partners Named Top 10 Largest Agency By Ad Age

by ampdev @ Advantage Marketing Partners

IRVINE, CA (May 1, 2017) – Advantage Marketing Partners announced today Ad Age has named the agency collective one of the largest networks worldwide and domestically. Advantage Marketing Partners ranked: #10 Largest U.S. Agency Network  19th Largest Agency Company Worldwide #1 U.S. Promotions Agency Network #1 U.S. Experiential / Event Marketing Agency Network  #3 Largest U.S. Hispanic-American...

The post Advantage Marketing Partners Named Top 10 Largest Agency By Ad Age appeared first on Advantage Marketing Partners.

Coca-Cola Renew: “We Are Coca-Cola—And So Much More”

by Dale Buss @ brandchannel:

#CocaColaRenew US corporate branding campaign celebrates its brands and people

The post Coca-Cola Renew: “We Are Coca-Cola—And So Much More” appeared first on brandchannel:.

Dove’s Ad Blunder Shows the Bar is Set Higher for Marketing to Women

Dove’s Ad Blunder Shows the Bar is Set Higher for Marketing to Women



Let me start with a question. Have you seen Dove’s most recent campaign? Now, Dove is owned by the same parent company, Unilever who sells Axe, male-targeted grooming products with a looooooong history of ads like this:  Don't get me wrong - this ad is hilarious, just hypocriti

The Top 4 Best Viral Video Marketing Campaigns of 2016

The Top 4 Best Viral Video Marketing Campaigns of 2016


Jeffbullas's Blog

Using video in your marketing campaigns is a great way to reach your target audience at scale. Learn from the best viral video marketing campaigns of 2016.

Ed Pilkington: Marketing success requires an appetite for risk

by Ed Pilkington @ Marketing Week

People have different relationships with risk, but most businesses would be better off if they freed staff from the fear of failure and encouraged experimentation.

The post Ed Pilkington: Marketing success requires an appetite for risk appeared first on Marketing Week.

Great Marketing Can Transform the Aftermarket Service Industry; Here's Why

Great Marketing Can Transform the Aftermarket Service Industry; Here's Why

by Katie Martell @ THE BLOG -

I believe great marketing can transform aftermarket service products.

This past week in Chicago, I had the chance to speak at The Service Council’s Smarter Services Symposium (whose eponym pays no respect to anyone with a lisp), a gathering of executives responsible for service products - aftermarket purchases - such as service warranties, contracts, parts, and more. 

My discussion focused on addressing one of the biggest challenges facing service executives - service marketing.

The emerging role of aftermarket services.

This service function is facing a period of immense change (what department isn’t?) 

The days of field service, parts operations, call centers etc. as a cost center which is solely the result of a product sale are nearing their end. Today, there’s a growing idea that there should be revenue driven from a service business. 

This department no doubt faces a perception problem - something we can empathize with in marketing - one that limits it to a “cost center” vs “profit driver.” 

The reality is, this function can drive tremendous strategic value within the organizations it serves. (TSC found this year that 92% of Champion organizations consider service to be a competitive differentiator compared to 42% of the entire community.) 

Sure, NPS will increase and CSAT scores will improve, but I’m talking about cold, hard cash. 

Training, installation, and consulting offer another method by which to exceed customer expectations and differentiate the organization. With many companies now looking for an advantage in competitive markets, aftermarket services can offer an edge - one that is sustainable, high-margin, and low-risk. 

One McKinsey analysis across 30 industries showed that average earnings-before-interest-and-taxes (EBIT) margin for aftermarket services was 25 percent, compared to 10 percent for new equipment.

Summarized succinctly in One HBR article

“Being on par with your rivals in performance, price, and quality gets you into the game; after-sales services can win you the game.” 

 

A massive opportunity to shift perception.

Historically, these after-sales services have been seen as a burden, not an opportunity.

I recently spoke to the fabulous Claudine Bianchi, CMO of ClickSoftware, who markets to service executives. She described this perception challenge, saying, "many executives still don’t look at customer satisfaction in terms of the valuation it can have on a company."

In the aforementioned HBR article, its authors revealed many “perceive after-sales services to be a necessary evil… like taxes.” 

Ouch. 

This problem of reputation is due in part to the legacy of services businesses. Seen as a reactive team, many demonstrate their success on the basis of solving a customer's problem - historically measuring (if at all) impact in terms of customer satisfaction. 

That’s a really limiting way of demonstrating value, when the true potential of this team lies in a term well-adopted by marketers - Customer Lifetime Value. In this case, Service Executives should focus on the aftermarket lifetime value of their customers. 

For some industries (gas turbines, helicopters, data storage) the aftermarket lifetime value of a customer can be 40-75% of the initial sales price of the product. In others, it can be 5x more. See more in this detailed benchmarking study by McKinsey.

Talk about leaving money on the table. 

A fundamental switch from reactive to proactive.

To achieve these kinds of growth potentials, Service Executives need to switch from their reactive nature to a proactive culture. 

This was the crux of my recommendations at TSC's event, and I leveraged their own data to make this point.

  • 58% of champions frequently educate customers on products/services compared to 17% of the entire community. 
  • 91% of champions consider it a priority to increase the coverage of their installed based, compared to only 50% of the community. 

Proactive Services Marketing is an enormous opportunity for services teams to dramatically improve their perception by unlocking the value of their aftermarket services.

ServiceMax (another vendor in this space) found that proactive selling can increase revenues by up to 160% within a year.

 

Does the future of aftermarket services depend on marketing?

Maybe.

I think the way to look at it is that we are in this together. 

Marketing is increasingly responsible for the customer experience, of which post-sale is certainly part. We are seeking differentiation in competitive markets, and are held accountable for more and more revenue. The insights gleaned from the front lines of field service technicians can be a gold mine for improving our customer understanding and intelligence. A feedback loop between our teams can help us to tailor products and messaging accordingly.

Marketing needs the aftermarket services function. 

Services, on the flip side, should consider marketing to be an important ally in the business. We can drive growth with engagement marketing that earns trust and compels buyers to take part in services programs. We can leverage your incredible amount of data coming from IoT and connected devices to better segment and personalize our efforts. We can help build the foundation for a cohesive customer experience by helping to integrate service data with sales and marketing systems so that each touchpoint is… the magic word... consistent. We can help to segment customers by their role in the buying committee, or by their specific need based on their usage or product history. 

Marketing can maximize the potential of services, and in turn, drive more impact in our organizations. This is truly a win win. 

And, while we can be your best ally, we can be your worst enemy. “The best service intentions can be derailed by poor sales and marketing activities.” (TSC).

Now is the time to invest in proactive service marketing.

In an informal poll of the room this week in Chicago, 50% of the audience had a dedicated team of service marketers on staff. The other half, did not. 

One attendee from an electronics company followed up with me after the show, sharing that he was the very first product marketing manager for their services department in the organization’s history. That’s 84 years without one.

The need for marketing services is here - and while many organizations aren’t there quite yet, those that win are waking up to this reality. 

Champion organizations are 2X as likely as others to have dedicated service marketers in place to support commercial business growth - TSC.

---

Thank you to Sumair Datta and Aly Pinder for inviting me to this year's event, and to Claudine Bianchi of ClickSoftware for her insights.

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Every week I send out new ideas, writings, and interesting links on marketing, business, and life. It’s free & curated by me. Get on the list.

Why You Should Automate Happy Birthday Emails For Your Customers

by Raúl Galera @ Word-of-Mouth and Referral Marketing Blog

The following is a guest post from our friends at Leumas Digital. Email automation is the key to driving revenue and traffic to your store. It’s when an email is sent out on an action. It doesn’t require anyone to press send, as a piece of software will send it at the correct time to […]

The post Why You Should Automate Happy Birthday Emails For Your Customers appeared first on Word-of-Mouth and Referral Marketing Blog.

Dove's Marketing Makeover - Baer Performance Marketing - Green Bay, WI

Dove's Marketing Makeover - Baer Performance Marketing - Green Bay, WI


Baer Performance Marketing - Green Bay, WI

In today’s society, commercials and advertisements are prevalent everywhere you look. Whether on the side of a moving bus or on late night television, advertising and the message behind it can resonate with millions of individuals worldwide. A great example of this can be seen in Dove’s “Campaign for Real Beauty” which started in 2004 …

Dove reaffirms commitment to Real Beauty for 60th anniversary

Dove reaffirms commitment to Real Beauty for 60th anniversary


Marketing Interactive

The campaign features 32 real women across ages and nationalities to show a diverse range of beauty.

Listen Well, Speak Up; and 3 more Lessons from Madge

Listen Well, Speak Up; and 3 more Lessons from Madge

by Katie Martell @ THE BLOG -

There really isn’t a word that accurately describes the feeling of walking into a room of over 1000 women.

Part of me was surprised – I mean, I’m so used to conferences being a room filled with mostly men. Another part of me was filled with anticipation - I’d been looking forward to this day for weeks.

It was the 2017 Women’s Leadership Forum, hosted by the Ad Club.

Regardless of how I felt walking in, it’s easy to articulate how I felt walking out:

Emboldened. Activated. Reassured.

One talk among many that day left me feeling particularly energized. It was given by Madge Meyer – a public speaker, author, and former EVP and Chief Innovation Officer at State Street, with a long career at organizations including Merrill Lynch and IBM.

Madge offered concise, yet profound lessons to the room, good and sound advice for both men and women.

1.    Speak Up

Early in Madge’s career, at IBM, she was told by a manager that she’d be no longer invited to his meetings. Why? Her quiet and shy personality.

“You never ask questions or make suggestions. You occupy a seat, and never give me any value.”

Though she was listening, albeit passively, it wasn’t good enough. This is an important takeaway for anyone (talking to you, ladies) who may feel nervous about speaking up in a meeting.

Madge asked her manager for a second chance. She promised to ask at least one question, and make at least one good suggestion every meeting. She was allowed to return.

Studies show (and so does women's collective experience every day) that professional women are actually penalized for voicing their opinions more frequently.

“Male executives who spoke more often than their peers were rewarded with 10 percent higher ratings of competence. When female executives spoke more than their peers, both men and women punished them with 14 percent lower ratings.”

Read more in this NYT article.

The article describes a speaking-up double bind that harms organizations by depriving them of valuable ideas.

While before, Madge would attend passively, she began attending actively – and her success in doing so was predicated on her ability to listen the right way.

2.    How to Listen Well

Madge pointed out that many suffer from selected listening in meetings.

We can all likely relate to this. Who hasn’t interacted with someone who spends entire conversations just waiting for their turn to talk?

For Madge, the difference between passively and actively attending was to cultivate the skill of listening well – focusing on what someone really says, and asking intelligent questions.

She shared the tenets of Ting – the Chinese word for the art of listening, which consists of four elements in its Chinese character; ear, ten eyes, a heart, and a king.

Listen with your ear, but with 100% attention and focus (ten eyes), wholeheartedly, and as if listening to your King.

Wouldn’t that make for different meetings…

3.    Tell People Who You Are

One particular story I enjoyed from early in Madge’s career focused on a series of achievements she made in highly complex technical roles. With degrees in mathematics in chemistry, she worked in… well… literal rocket science.

Despite outstanding work, she found herself passed over for promotion in favor of her male colleagues multiple times. Frustrated, she went to her brother for advice.

What he said to her resonated with me, and the rest of the room, as I saw heads nodding in agreement:

“You’ve got to tell people who you are, otherwise, why would they listen to you?”

Being a Chinese immigrant, she possessed a cultural expectation that her accomplishments would be enough to get her promoted. Her experienced was proving this not necessarily true in America. While she did not want to brag, she realized the importance of outside recognition.

“You must show your value to the business. Doing a good job is not enough.”

Years later, as a manager at State Street, Madge ensured the work her team did was recognized consistently, to the tune of 32 industry awards.  

It's critical to toot your own horn. Be your own advocate.

4.    Never Accept No

Whether it was “you’re no longer invited to this meeting” or “you will never become an EVP” or “the answer is no on this project” – Madge persisted.

In one story shared, Madge had identified a massive cost-savings opportunity for State Street. While it would require some significant change, it would save the organization millions. Her proposal, however, was rejected by a committee who told her – Madge, the answer is no.

Expecting a fight, they were relieved to hear her say “OK” in the meeting, and walk out.

Where she was headed, however, was directly to her manager. She confidently brokered a deal (seriously, love this woman) – to let the results of a test dictate the viability of the proposal. If she couldn’t save the company $10M, they could fire her.

Yeah, she bet her job on it. No pressure. Casual.

Madge ended up saving the company $42M (boom), and earning the trust she so well deserved on her path to EVP.

In this story, she mentioned a piece of advice from her parents:

“When the boat hits the shore, you don’t keep trying to move forward. You turn right or left.”

Never accept no for an answer. Go around, and find a way to make it a yes.

5.    How to Innovate

All of these stories, weaved throughout her experience, built a strong foundation for Madge’s unique understanding of the concept of innovation – something she consults organizations on now. At the end of her talk, Madge shared a kind of alphabet of innovation, at least from A-G.

Innovation is:

Anticipatory, not reactive.

Business focused, not technology-driven.

Creative destruction, not guardianship. It’s very easy to hold on to the old way of doing things. Change is a risk.

Distributive leadership, not command and control. Companies that are top down must consider a culture of innovation, letting all people bring ideas to the surface.

Execution, not just inspiration. Madge recalled a Japanese saying:

If you have a vision with no execution, you have a day dream. If you have execution with no vision, you have a nightmare.

Fast and flexible, not fixed or frozen.

Global mindset nor parochial thinking. Leaders must move past only what they're comfortable with, and reach beyond boundaries.

---

I could not get enough of Madge’s easy humor, or her confident humility.

I realize “confident humility” may be an oxymoron, but what I witnessed was a delicate balance of touting her remarkable success, sharing lessons born of mistakes, all delivered with an empathy that left each of us feeling that her journey was – or could be - our own.

 

For more, listen to Madge’s podcast “Innovation is Business as Usual” and read her book The Innovator’s Path.

Thank you to the Ad Club of Boston for having me at the 9th annual Womens Leadership Forum – Stories told, by women bold.

 

 

Every Saturday morning I send out new ideas, writings, and interesting links on marketing, business, and life. It’s free & curated by me. Get on the list.

Thomas Barta: Marketers must stop being digitally naïve

by Thomas Barta @ Marketing Week

The label 'digital' makes marketers throw all leadership rules overboard. They shouldn’t.

The post Thomas Barta: Marketers must stop being digitally naïve appeared first on Marketing Week.

Facebook responds to growing ‘uneasiness’ over brand safety with new ad controls

by Sarah Vizard @ Marketing Week

The social network is introducing new eligibility standards for publishers and creators that will lay out more clearly the type of content that can be monetised.

The post Facebook responds to growing ‘uneasiness’ over brand safety with new ad controls appeared first on Marketing Week.

Dove's body-shaped bottles backfire

Dove's body-shaped bottles backfire


Campaign Asia

The Unilever brand celebrated body diversity with limited edition packaging, but many consumers were insulted, not inspired, by the "Real Beauty" message.

Marketoonist on PowerPoint pitches

by Tom Fishburne @ Marketing Week

Tom Fishburne is founder of Marketoon Studios. Follow his work at marketoonist.com or on Twitter @tomfishburne See more of the Marketoonist here Tom Fishburne will be speaking at the Festival of Marketing, which is taking place on 4 and 5 October at Tobacco Dock. To find out more information, including how to book tickets, visit […]

The post Marketoonist on PowerPoint pitches appeared first on Marketing Week.

Amazon reveals how it thinks about advertising

by Sarah Vizard @ Marketing Week

The retail giant is rapidly building out its ad business but says marketers should think of it as a way to add value to the customer, not just as a sales tool.

The post Amazon reveals how it thinks about advertising appeared first on Marketing Week.

As Warm As Its Cookie: 5 Questions With DoubleTree’s Stuart Foster

by Dale Buss @ brandchannel:

DoubleTree by Hilton elevates its iconic welcome cookie into a social campaign with #SweetWelcome

The post As Warm As Its Cookie: 5 Questions With DoubleTree’s Stuart Foster appeared first on brandchannel:.

Campaign Trail: Netflix says it's a joke; KFC records road trip cassette; PB&J's breakup bombshell

by @ Marketing Dive - Latest News

How Netflix, KFC and MaraNatha leverage the unexpected to grab attention and make viewers laugh. 

The Importance of Brand Awareness

by admin @ Baer Performance Marketing – Green Bay, WI

Blog post by: Drew Rhodes, Baer Performance Marketing Intern What is brand awareness? Investopedia defines it as the “extent to which consumers are familiar with the distinctive qualities or image of a particular brand of goods or services.” Brand awareness is important when launching new products and services, and it drives consumers’ decisions when differentiating […]

The post The Importance of Brand Awareness appeared first on Baer Performance Marketing - Green Bay, WI.

Digital Marketing Trends To Watch In 2017

by FormediaPR @ Formedia | PR - Marketing - Design - Web » Formedia | PR - Marketing - Design - Web |

It’s been an exciting year in digital marketing, and despite the various ups and downs, the past twelve months have been overwhelmingly positive, with a wealth of new technology shaping the way brands have started to engage with their target audiences. In this fast-paced industry,...

Dove’s Ad Blunder Shows the Bar is Set Higher for Marketing to Women

Dove’s Ad Blunder Shows the Bar is Set Higher for Marketing to Women

by Katie Martell @ THE BLOG -

Let me start with a question. Have you seen Dove’s most recent campaign?

 

Now, Dove is owned by the same parent company, Unilever who sells Axe, male-targeted grooming products with a looooooong history of ads like this:

 

 

Don't get me wrong - this ad is hilarious, just hypocritical coming from the same company promoting the "real beauty" narrative.

Yes, Unilever, tell us again how you lead the fight against unrealistic body standards in the media.

Dove (Unilever)’s body-shaped bottle campaign in the UK (in partnership with Ogilvy London) is yet another example of a company stumbling and crashing head-first as they attempt to traverse the space between women’s body-image in the media, and selling consumer goods.

While the notion that society needs equality between men and women has been around since the 1700s it just happens to be f***ing trendy right now.

I have written before about the exploitation of marketing to womenMore than once.

But the Daily Dot says it best:

“When is a movement not a movement? When it’s a marketing campaign in a movement’s clothing.”

Yeah.

Movements in marketing, done well, are powerful. I just presented on this very topic at Oracle’s Modern Customer Experience in Vegas. But they must strike a tone of authenticity. The most recent ridiculous body shape bottles from Dove miss the mark. I particularly enjoy Jeff Beer of Fast Company’s take on it:

“Dove itself conditioned us against this type of thing. It's too easy. Too shallow. The quality of its past work, means there is no room for half-stepping.

When you raise your audience's expectation, you're simply not allowed to sink back into common gimmickry.”

 

While the marketer in me empathizes with the intention of this latest campaign (I get it, it’s difficult to think of creative ideas to break through the noise,) I can’t help but cringe at the thought of a room full of my peers nodding in agreement at this stunt, saying “you know what - this is a GREAT idea!”

And it’s not just me – the body-shaped bottle nightmare has driven headlines and mockery online:

“I’ve yet to meet the woman honoured and celebrated by plastic bottles on supermarket shelves." – Ruth Mortimer in Marketing Week

“Dove, I have arms, please advise” – Rachel Handler on Twitter

“With this campaign, Dove has moved from celebrating the diversity of the human body to celebrating the diversity of its products’ packaging,” – Clayton Purdom in AV Club

“Have you ever been in the shower, picked up your smooth, perfect soap container and screamed ‘I CAN’T LIVE UP TO THESE STANDARDS!’”? – Aimee Lutkin in Jezebel

Hilarious.

 

Another buzzword nobody needs: Femvertising

Perhaps the worst thing to emerge from all of this is a term that nobody needs - “femvertising” or what Forbes defines as “harnessing feminism in advertising” something Dove has apparently created.

Dove’s “Campaign for Real Beauty” back in 2004 in partnership with Ogilvy & Mather, Edelman Public Relations, and Harbinger Communications was… cute. And it was praised heavily for its message for women – love thyself (then go buy our stuff). The buzz around the campaign drove 30X the exposure than the paid-for media space.

But I have some qualms about this word, “femvertising.” Let’s recap:

·     Feminism = the idea that women should be treated equally to men

·     Advertising = paid announcement meant to sell product

·     Exploitation = taking advantage of someone to benefit from their work

So before we all celebrate the ridiculous concept of “femvertising!” let’s stop and consider the importance of actual feminism, the motivation behind these attempts-at-exploiting feminism, and the very real consequences.

Dove (and every single company for that matter) can do more to support women instead of these dopey, minimizing, lazy, exploitative bottles.

Within the tech space, an industry with devastatingly unequal gender parity set against a narrative of lawsuits, it’s encouraging to read stories like this one, a real SaaS company (client) with two female co-founders who have built a culture of gender equality. They don’t just talk a big game, they bring the concept of equality to life in real business decisions.

Passing the mic back to Ruth Mortimer:

"I like that a brand wants to celebrate women. But here’s a useful guide to doing so. Employ lots of them.

Demand your agencies and suppliers are diverse. Celebrate women for their actual achievements, not just their appearance. Align yourself with causes that benefit women. Continue to show diverse people with diverse figures in your advertising.”

 

If basic decency isn’t enough motivation for companies to support women, women are the ultimate economic accelerator.

Companies with a strong track record of gender diversity are 15% more likely to have higher earnings than their peers. In fact, among all Fortune 500 companies, the ones with the highest representation of women on their boards significantly outperform the others. Read more.

This backlash about Dove shows it’s time to set the bar higher.

 

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I’m going to take this moment to again share pioneering activist Jean Kilbourne’s incredible work to expose the power (and danger) of advertising, since the late 1960s. Take a few minutes to watch her videos. Just do it.

You know what, don’t get up, I’ll embed one right here if you’re skimming this post for the good stuff:

 

 

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Every week I send out new ideas, writings, and interesting links on marketing, business, and life. It’s free & curated by me. Get on the list.

What I Learned By Looking at 734 Playboy Centerfolds in One Sitting

What I Learned By Looking at 734 Playboy Centerfolds in One Sitting

by Christina Cauterucci @ The XX Factor

There’s no wrong way to read Playboy’s new coffee table book of naked ladies. You can breeze through the encyclopedic collection of centerfolds in chunks, stopping when a shiny lower lip or well-groomed clitoral hood catches your interest. You can use the index to find a favorite Playmate, if you’re the kind of person who has a favorite Playmate. You can turn to the year you were born or bat mitzvahed and see what the residents of dudeland were drooling over that month. You can flick the pages like a flipbook, watching faces and skin blur together like a demonic wormhole that really, really wants to have sex with you.

But if you’re going to drop up to $75 on an 8 1/2-pound volume of exposed flesh, I’d recommend taking an hour or so to leaf through the entire thing, page by page. Playboy: The Complete Centerfolds, 1953–2016 offers exactly what it advertises: every single centerfold the magazine has published through February of last year. That is a remarkable number of bodies to trap in one volume. Taken together, they offer a kind of biological survey few humans will experience in their lifetimes. Even the world’s busiest doctors and most-overbooked porn stars don’t see 700-some-odd naked women in a single hour.

If you take this route, as I did on Thursday afternoon in a painstakingly sequestered corner of the Slate office, you will catalog approximately 1,400 nipples of various shades, textures, and surface areas. You will see several hundred labia and, if you have a set, think carefully about your own. You will despair at how the satin robe and garter belt industries have escaped any attempts at meaningful innovation in the past half-century. You will wonder why, in the 2010s, just as Earth was experiencing the hottest temperatures in recorded history, all women suddenly got visibly cold.

This volume is actually something of a reprint. The first edition was published a decade ago; the book that came out on Tuesday includes the most recent 10 years and a new short essay from Elizabeth Wurtzel on the centerfolds of the 2010s. Playboy is marketing it as a kind of chronology of the female body seen through the proverbial male gaze, a way to track how beauty ideals and sexual fantasies have evolved since Hugh Hefner printed the magazine’s first issue.

The most obvious signifier of the passage of time, and the thing every person has asked about when I’ve mentioned this book, is pubic hair. For the first two decades of centerfolds, there was none at all because it was obscured by strategically placed pillows, undergarments, or even roomy-cut khakis. Bits of hair didn’t start peeking out until around 1972, but by the mid-’70s, bushy vulvas were showing up in almost every photo. A decade later, hairstylists started to groom the puffs, though it wasn’t until the mid-’90s that what’s now known as a “landing strip” hit the runway. The relative newness of the thing about 84 percent of women now do to their genitals was a life-affirming revelation for this millennial, who suffered puberty in the aughts, or as Maureen Gibbon’s essay in The Complete Centerfolds dubs it, “the decade of the smoothie.” After enduring the entirely bare, child-like crotches of the 2010s, flip back to July 1977, where one magnificent image of pubic hair straight-up poking out of a butt crack will restore your internal calm.

The maturation of photo-retouching techniques, which begin in the 1980s and ramp up in the ’90s, delivers another major sea change in the book. Earlier photos exhibit a kind of Vaseline-on-the-lens radiance, with softer lighting than the high-def flashbulbs of later years. Before Photoshop made every limb a perfect cylinder with a computer-assisted color gradient, skin had actual texture, betraying goosebumps, peach fuzz, and tiny wrinkles where the legs meet the hips. In fashions, too, the Playboy timeline charts a shift from the natural-ish to the absurd. Peasant dresses and open argyle cardigans gave way to bathing suits fit for Borat and webs of spangled fabric that wouldn’t impede any sex act the average mind could invent. Mascara and rouge gave way to silicone, suntans, and gigantic, heavily-lined lips. The fantasy of the ’50s was that the women on these pages might actually succumb to the average schmuck’s pick-up lines at the sock hop or milkshake counter or wherever white folks performed their mating rituals in those days. The fantasy of the ’90s and ’00s was that these glistening, medicine ball–breasted women existed at all.

But for all the differences that emerge while flipping through generations of nudies, the similarities stand out far more. After looking at 734 photos of naked women, one can’t help but conclude that the human body has some very strict limitations and the human mind lacks any substantial creativity when it comes to sexy poses. There are only so many ways to slightly part a set of lips, only so many ways to mimic the act of putting clothes on or taking them off, getting in or out of a body of water, and stepping onto or off of a surface that looks reasonably prepared to support sexual intercourse. Some themes have always been hot: cowboy stables (chaps, lassos, bolo ties dangling between breasts); sportsing (phallic sticks and bats, mesh jerseys, kneesocks); childhood (glasses of milk, merry-go-rounds, dolls); servile domesticity (aprons, pies, and once, disturbingly, pinking shears).

It’s a pleasure to see this kind of Playboy world-making get more elaborate and less self-conscious as time goes by. There are a few funny scenes in earlier years: One deeply weird 1967 shot shows a woman standing on a primitive Onewheel with her toe resting on a shuttle cock, and one from 1983 has a gal luxuriating in a tanning bed, eye shields and all. But the fantasies get way more specific in the ’90s, with a flight attendant exiting an airplane bathroom, a military jacket with dog tags worn as a belly chain, more nautical dioramas than a landlubber might expect, and a prescient cigar situation in July 1996, just before the Clinton–Lewinsky “it tastes good” moment became public. Around the turn of the millennium, schoolgirls started dominating the pages of Playboy, with some dorm room arrangements so scrupulously imagined, they could be ads for PBteen. The effect is a creeping feeling that any place can be a sexual place, and any activity a woman does—even those performed in the course of her job—can be a sexual activity. Playing golf, taking your order at a diner, exercising on a Stairmaster, applying a lure to a fishing rod, cuddling with a kitten, delivering the nightly news at a TV station—if you look hard enough, with a few years of Playboy centerfolds filed away in your brain, these everyday pursuits are actually a kind of foreplay. That cyclist lady is naked underneath her flannel, you know.

Should you, like me, choose to absorb each and every centerfold in rapid succession, the outfits will eventually cease to matter. So, strangely, will the human forms. If you say a word too many times in a row, it starts to lose its meaning. If you review hundreds of naked women in one sitting, the fact of their nudity will lose its meaning, too. Curves and lumps and flaps of flesh punctuated by the occasional dimple or mole will become indistinguishable shapes in the void. By the 40th minute of scrutiny, the nearly half an acre of human skin you’ve seen will have lost all erotic potential, each body just another disgusting bag of organs and blood. As one Amazon reviewer put it, “What an awesome treasure for men!!!”

7 SFW Examples Of How Pornhub Generates Word-Of-Mouth

by Jon Tan @ Word-of-Mouth and Referral Marketing Blog

Marketers have long embraced the adage “Sex Sells” but only very recently have they had to ponder what “Sells Sex”. The most difficult question here is… how do you get people talking about porn? Despite its gradual ascension from taboo into the mainstream, porn isn’t something most people talk about having lunch with the in-laws […]

The post 7 SFW Examples Of How Pornhub Generates Word-Of-Mouth appeared first on Word-of-Mouth and Referral Marketing Blog.

In Defense of Dove’s “Female-Empowerment” Marketing

In Defense of Dove’s “Female-Empowerment” Marketing


Dame Magazine

The company’s latest #SpeakBeautiful campaign has the haters out in full force. But could their seemingly insincere tactics have a genuine effect?

The Best of Global Digital Marketing in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

by Best Marketing @ Best Marketing

19th July 2016 In cooperation with Adoi Magazine More information coming soon!

The Best of Global Digital Marketing in Istanbul, Turkey

by Best Marketing @ Best Marketing

4th May 2016 In cooperation with IAB Turkey

How marketers are stepping up to take control of media

by Thomas Hobbs @ Marketing Week

Media transparency has become a major issue, but brands including Pernod Ricard, O2 and B&Q are taking steps to ensure they have more control and a better understanding of where their spend is going.

The post How marketers are stepping up to take control of media appeared first on Marketing Week.

Ivanka Just Helped Make It Harder for “Women Who Work” to Expose Wage Discrimination

Ivanka Just Helped Make It Harder for “Women Who Work” to Expose Wage Discrimination

by Christina Cauterucci @ The XX Factor

The Trump administration sent a memo on Tuesday announcing its plan to halt a planned Obama-era rule meant to advance equal pay. Starting in the spring of 2018, businesses with 100 or more employees would have had to add salary information to their existing federal reporting on the race and gender demographics of their workforces. Neomi Rao, who runs the Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs, has told the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission to stop the rule from going into effect, claiming that it would be “enormously burdensome” to companies.

Rao also wrote in her memo to Acting EEOC Chair Victoria Lipnic that the rule may violate the Paperwork Reduction Act, a federal law meant to reduce unnecessary mandatory paperwork. The Office of Management and Budget “is concerned that some aspects of the revised collection of information lack practical utility, are unnecessarily burdensome, and do not adequately address privacy and confidentiality issues,” Rao wrote.

The Department of Labor has been collecting demographic data from employers for half a century to assess possible cases of hiring discrimination. Currently, companies with 100 or more workers report their race and gender stats in 10 job groups. The rule the Trump administration has stayed would have required that they also report those stats across 12 “pay bands.” The Obama administration introduced the rule in January 2016, on the seventh anniversary of the Lily Ledbetter Fair Pay Act. At the time, White House adviser Valerie Jarrett and the then-chair of the EEOC applauded the new rule as a way to beef up the federal government’s enforcement of existing equal-pay laws. When she unveiled the rule, Yang said the data would help the EEOC analyze pay disparities in different industries, launch “larger, more complex investigations” into wage discrimination, and make stronger cases when people report their employers for unequal pay.

Tuesday’s news wasn’t a complete surprise, because Trump thinks wage discrimination isn’t a real issue. Four days ago, he issued a memo declaring Aug. 26, the anniversary of the 19th Amendment, “Women’s Equality Day,” as previous presidents have done. “My Administration is committed to fostering an economy where all women can succeed and thrive,” he wrote, praising efforts to help women entrepreneurs and establish universal paid family leave. But he’s previously said that “you’re gonna make the same if you do as good a job,” and “when you have to categorize men and women into a particular group and a particular pay scale, it gets very—because people do different jobs,” implying that the gender and race wage gaps are attributable to poor performance and self-selection into different careers. He’s also repealed rules that forced federal contractors to be transparent about their wages and stay away from forced-arbitration clauses that make it easier for companies to cover up cases of sexual harassment.

But while Trump’s new blow to equal pay is right in line with the values he espouses, it’s a telling change of tune for Ivanka, who has made equal pay a core part of her campaign to seem like a reasonable, trustworthy, pro-woman foil to her father. One might have expected her to anonymous-source her way out of this debate, leaking that she tried to get Trump to reconsider his plans to declaw the EEOC’s anti-discrimination investigations. Instead, she said she agrees with her dad’s decision. “While I believe the intention was good and agree that pay transparency is important, the proposed policy would not yield the intended results,” she said in a statement. “We look forward to continuing to work with EEOC, OMB, Congress and all relevant stakeholders on robust policies aimed at eliminating the gender wage gap.” Her statement is transparently dumb: There is no way to make an honest case for the position that more data and transparency will not help the EEOC identify possible cases of wage discrimination or prosecute those flagged by employees. If Ivanka wants to close the gender wage gap, letting companies keep their wages secret is a bad way to start.

Ultimately, the Trump calculus here was simple. Businesses know they’ll be more likely to get on the hook for unequal pay if they have to report their pay structures disaggregated by demographics, so that's likely why they don’t want to do it. The Wall Street Journal reports that Lipnic once said of the rule that the “benefits of this are not worth the costs” to businesses. Businesses already have the information they’d need to report, since they already report demographic data—all it would take to organize it by pay would be a bit of futzing with a spreadsheet the first year. It’s not the cost of reporting that’s so unacceptable to businesses that they’ve gotten the Chamber of Commerce to lobby against the rule. It’s the cost of being sued for discrimination. In the power struggle between the victims of that discrimination and the mostly white men who exploit them for profit, Ivanka has publicly chosen her side.

How beauty giant Dove went from empowering to patronising

How beauty giant Dove went from empowering to patronising


the Guardian

The £3bn toiletries brand was one of the first brands to embrace ‘femvertising’, but its body-shaped bottles have been roundly ridiculed. Can it repair the damage?

Report: Snap's hardware lab cuts marketing jobs after leadership change

by @ Mobile Marketer - Latest News

The lab that makes the Spectacles video-camera glasses named Mark Randall as its new head.

Mark Ritson: Google’s lack of transparency should have us all worried

by Mark Ritson @ Marketing Week

Google's corporate mission that suggests openness and transparency is at direct odds with its actions.

The post Mark Ritson: Google’s lack of transparency should have us all worried appeared first on Marketing Week.

10 Years On: Learning From Dove’s Campaign for Real Beauty – JS Daw & Associates

10 Years On: Learning From Dove’s Campaign for Real Beauty – JS Daw & Associates


JS Daw & Associates

By Isobel Chiang They say necessity is the mother of invention (humans required a more efficient mode of locomotion, so... Read more »

Some of the U.S’s Creepiest Anti-Abortion Men Are Running for Office in Alabama

Some of the U.S’s Creepiest Anti-Abortion Men Are Running for Office in Alabama

by Christina Cauterucci @ The XX Factor

When Alabamians go to the polls next fall, they may have more than one extreme anti-choice man to vote for. They are Sam McLure, a nutso adoption lawyer seeking the Republican nomination for attorney general, and fellow Republican Roy Moore, who is currently leading in the polls and wants to unseat Luther Strange, the Trump-backed U.S. Senator appointed to fill Jeff Sessions’ seat.

McLure, a Macklemore-looking dude with a dimpled chin, lists four main issues of concern on his campaign website. The first is “Prosecute Abortionists Who Profit from Killing Children.” The man does not mince words! Rewire has done some excellent reporting on McLure’s history as an anti-abortion activist: He claims to engage in regular “sidewalk counseling” outside abortion clinics, though the director of one of the spaces he claims to harass told Rewire that he’s a “brand new” addition to the crowds outside, just there “to get his name out there because nobody knows who he is.”

The Facebook Live video is McLure’s preferred messaging method. One from the beginning of August is titled “Babies are Murdered Here”; in it, McLure stands in front of pro-choice demonstrators holding a printed-out photo of a doctor who provides abortion care. “This woman…profits from deceiving parents into killing their children,” he says. Another video from September finds McLure pointing at abortion clinics, saying “I want to eradicate places like this.” McLure has posted links on his social media pages to one doctor’s personal information, including photos of what is allegedly her car and license plate, challenging anyone to give him one good reason why he shouldn’t prosecute her for murder. In a September 8 video, McLure says that although “it’s not nice” to dox abortion providers, “it’s not nice to kill babies” either. His repeated posts on abortion have prompted one Facebook commenter to wonder, “does he have any stances on other issues?”

McLure has argued in interviews and Facebook videos that, as attorney general, he could “eradicate legal abortion” by making life “hell on earth” for abortion providers and bringing homicide charges against them. He has proposed removing the abortion exception from the “fetal homicide” section of the Alabama penal code and establishing a state militia to defend any state official who might otherwise be jailed for disobeying federal court orders that protected abortion rights.

“A well-regulated militia is necessary for the protection of a free state,” McLure said at a summer gathering for the Alabama Constitution Party, according to Rewire. “Where is Alabama’s militia? If the governor or attorney general of our state defied the federal government and said ‘We’re going to protect babies from murder,’ and some federal law enforcement officer tried to drag our governor into a federal jail, who will protect our governor?” McLure reiterated that stance to Rewire, calling himself “a proponent of the idea that the states need to exert their sovereignty [and] ignore Roe v. Wade.”

Alabama’s got at least one other political candidate who advocates for ignoring federal laws establishing basic rights. Moore, who joined McLure in a 2012 attempt to get the U.S. Supreme Court to overturn a ruling that shot down Oklahoma’s proposed constitutional amendment on “personhood,” was twice kicked off the Alabama Supreme Court—once because he refused to abide the U.S. Supreme Court’s affirmation of marriage equality.

On Thursday, in a debate against Sen. Luther Strange, Moore enumerated several evils that are plaguing America. “Abortion, sodomy, [and] sexual perversion” are hobbling the nation, Moore, said, in addition to a few other combinations of right-wing buzzwords, like “transgender troops in our bathrooms.” The militant wing of the anti-abortion movement loves this candidate’s commitment to the cause. Matt Trewhella, who once did jail time for blocking the driveway of a doctor who provided abortion care, is listed on Moore’s campaign website as a prominent endorser. In the ‘90s, Trewhella and several other activists signed a statement asserting that “lethal force” is “justifiable” to protect “the lives of unborn children”—in other words, that murdering an abortion provider is an ethical act. Between the company Moore keeps and his proven record of flouting federal law as a justice, it’s not hard to imagine the kind of absurd anti-woman (and, of course, anti-sodomy) shenanigans he’d get into in the Senate.

The Best of Global Digital Marketing in Mumbai, India

by Best Marketing @ Best Marketing

18th October 2016

15 ad campaigns that made marketing history

15 ad campaigns that made marketing history


Typeform blog

Whether it’s down to a heartfelt message, a canny script, or clever branding, 15 marketing professionals share the one campaign they'll never forget.

Social Media Trends to Get On Board With

by admin @ Elevate Promo

The world of marketing and advertising is constantly evolving. This means that your marketing strategies from a few years ago are probably obsolete. This isn’t an entirely bad thing, though. It just means that you need to adjust how you present yourself to the public and try to bring customers to you and your business. […]

“Human sources will always be the bedrock”

by Gašper @ Marketing magazin

  An award winning journalist was recently declared as one of the most influential British journalists. Moreover, Calvert achieved a global recognition with a piece on corruption in FIFA, which eventually led to the fall of senior FIFA officials. Together with his colleague Heidi Blake he described the sensational investigative process in The Ugly Game book. […]

The post “Human sources will always be the bedrock” appeared first on Marketing magazin.

Dov Charney’s New Clothing Line Is Like American Apparel, But Profoundly Unflattering

Dov Charney’s New Clothing Line Is Like American Apparel, But Profoundly Unflattering

by Christina Cauterucci @ The XX Factor

For a while there, the future didn’t look so hot for Dov Charney, the ousted American Apparel founder you’ve probably confused for Terry Richardson more than once. After weathering several years of sexual-harassment lawsuits and assault allegations from former employees, the man who calls himself “one of the most forward-thinking industrialists and entrepreneurs of his generation” found himself booted from his own company, which soon after filed for bankruptcy twice, in 2014. The new leaders refused a $300 million offer to put Charney back in charge before selling off the company’s intellectual property to a Canadian T-shirt maker for just $88 million.

Charney was the living embodiment of the brand he’d helmed for two-and-a-half decades. He wore a uniform of basics—white T-shirts, crewneck sweatshirts, sweatpants, and simple slacks—paired with so-unflattering-they’re-flattering thick-rimmed aviators. He matched his commitment to fair labor practices and progressive politics on issues like immigration with an unredeemably skeevy attitude toward young women’s bodies. Who would he be without the company he’d painstakingly created in his own image? What could he create, unshackled from the suffocating confines of high-waisted shimmery jeggings?

We now have an answer: the same exact damn thing. Charney’s new company, Los Angeles Apparel, is now selling a collection of tops to wholesale printers, and they may as well be hanging off the flashbulb-lit frames of 80-pound teens already. (The current models are decidedly unsexualized, though Charney has promised that “human sexuality is part of the reason that people wear clothes,” so “you’re not going to escape our sexuality from a narrative about a clothing company.”)

The slim-cut tri-blend crewnecks you gifted your boring boyfriend in college; the red-and-white raglan tees you bought when you and your friends were zombie old-timey baseball players for Halloween; the white-zippered hoodies that were as close to a fashion status symbol as hipsters got in the early aughts—they’re all here!

The company admits, or maybe boasts, the garments’ indistinguishability from Charney’s old goods. The “classic originals” Los Angeles Apparel sells “are equivalent to the styles Charney has offered in the past, from a specification, color and textile perspective,” the site reads. It also states that any other “style that was made by Dov in the past” could be available for a custom order.

If you’re looking for something a bit more cutting-edge that could give Los Angeles Apparel a leg up over its American (now Canadian) counterpart, check out the company’s “new innovations” page, where you’ll find—more solid-colored tees and sweatshirts?

These appear to be crafted from thicker and coarser fabrics than American Apparel standards, and built in baggier cuts. This has the effect of making Charney’s female model, who might have been slinking around with her nipples poking out of a sheer tank in years past, look almost comically lost in a gigantic, shapeless cube of undrapeable fabric.

Having pioneered the mass-produced fitted “women’s” tee more than a decade ago, Charney has now taken his powers of creativity in the opposite direction: making soft, flattering essentials less comfortable and more awkward to wear.

On the surface, that wouldn’t seem like a promising solution to American Apparel’s fatal flaw: nobody buying its clothes. Then again, Charney was doing elastic-ankled sweatpants and puffy-abdomened, high-waisted jeans long before anyone could have imagined they’d become long-lasting trends. If he is the marketing genius he claims to be, we can expect to be swallowed up by stiff, boxy T-shirts for years to come.

Fall Marketing Internship Opportunity

by admin @ Baer Performance Marketing – Green Bay, WI

Baer Performance Marketing is a marketing firm representing national, regional, and local businesses. Our company offers a diverse and fast-paced environment for expanding professional skills and career development. Position Description: The marketing internship is a temporary position intended to provide undergraduate and graduate students an opportunity for professional development in the rapidly-evolving marketing industry. Interns […]

The post Fall Marketing Internship Opportunity appeared first on Baer Performance Marketing - Green Bay, WI.

Hillary Clinton’s Book Tour Is a Dose of Much-Needed Therapy for Her Fans

Hillary Clinton’s Book Tour Is a Dose of Much-Needed Therapy for Her Fans

by Christina Cauterucci @ The XX Factor

Hillary Clinton opened her What Happened book tour on Monday night with what sounded like a retort to the critics who’ve said she should have never written the book in the first place. In a bit of self-aware justification, Clinton told her interlocutor—former speechwriter and campaign advisor Lissa Muscatine—that the writing process gave her the “discipline and deadline” she needed to sort through both her own feelings and her shock at America’s election of a malicious wannabe tyrant. It was an act of “catharsis,” Clinton said. “It was my therapy.”

The product of her efforts seemed to have a similar effect on her audience. The bodies filling the seats at Washington, D.C.’s Warner Theatre quaked when Clinton walked onto the stage, giving her an ear-splitting standing ovation that shook the floor of the venue. Every minor attempt at a joke was met with riotous laughter, every dig at Trump with a lengthy round of applause. There were more than a few tears.

You’ve got to be a pretty big Hillary Clinton fan to spend up to $82 to sit in a room and listen to her say things you’ve probably heard her say before. Because it’s D.C., the theater also contained several former campaign staffers. These weren’t casual Clinton voters. They were her diehards, the people for whom the termination of a potential Clinton presidency was nearly as devastating as the bombshell of a Trump one. Their enthusiastic support wasn’t just about making the first female president, but electing this specific candidate, with her formidable resume, unflagging composure, and history of pressing on in the face of sexist attacks. The election and American democracy as we once knew it may be over, but the cult of Hillary Clinton is not.

Anyone who doubted Clinton’s “likability” or capacity to inspire hope in young women during her campaign should look to the crowds who’ll flock to her 15-city book tour to understand the magic some attributed to her candidacy. Monday’s event felt strangely intimate, with audience members eagerly nodding along as if they were at a cozy reunion with a friend they hadn’t seen in years. They erupted in cheers when Clinton spoke about turning to friends and family in the difficult days after the election. They booed and hissed when she mentioned Matt Lauer, whom Clinton calls out in the book for incessantly harping on her emails while letting Trump babble nonsense about ISIS. The audience seemed equally enthralled with Clinton the person as with Clinton the candidate, and genuinely concerned for her well-being.

Underlying their concern for Clinton the woman is a deep sense of identification with her. On Monday, Muscatine gave Clinton several pairs of nouns and had her choose her favorite: coffee or tea (Clinton chose coffee); yoga or Pilates (yoga); shower or bath (“it depends on how much time you have”); and vodka or chardonnay (“again, it depends on how much time you have”). It was silly and banal, but dozens of audience members clapped and hooted after each answer. So eager were these people to identify with Clinton that they screamed in a public place simply because she too prefers coffee over tea, like the majority of other U.S. adults. When it came time for audience questions, which were submitted in advance, several were just messages of thanks. One noted that the writer was drinking wine with Clinton “in solidarity.”

This book and attendant publicity tour will mark an important step in the grieving process for those Clinton fans who see themselves, and perhaps their own thwarted ambitions, in her struggles. For them, grappling with the daily horrors of the Trump administration has probably left little time or mental space to process Clinton’s loss. There is no shortage of policies to protest amid righteous, chanting hordes, but few outlets for feelings about the candidate herself. Seeing her onstage, back in the public eye on her own terms and in visibly good spirits, will give some a sense of closure they need. If Clinton can rebound and crank out a book after the worst setback of her professional life, maybe the rest of us can churn on, too.

Clinton made exactly this point on Monday night. “At the end of the day, everybody has disappointments. Everybody has losses,” she said. “I view this book as much about resilience as about running for president. … I want others, no matter what happens to you in life, to understand that there are ways to get up and keep going. Don’t give up on yourselves.” You know else recently wrote a book about resilience? Sheryl Sandberg, whose co-written book Option B chronicles, among other things, her emotional journey after the death of her husband. Clinton and Sandberg are acquaintances, and Sandberg starred in a prominent anecdote about women in leadership that Clinton shared on Monday. In the story, Clinton repeatedly referred to the Facebook COO’s previous book and business philosophy, Lean In, as “Lean On.”

It was a rather endearing flub-up that Clinton never caught and Muscatine was too nice to correct. But, looking out on a sea of faces eager to process their lingering devastation in the company of hundreds of other Clinton fans, the former candidate might have committed a Freudian slip. As far as advice for recovering from electoral trauma goes, “lean on” isn’t half bad.

Almost three in four global marketers still unaware of full GDPR implications

by Sarah Vizard @ Marketing Week

The new European data laws are set to come into effect in just nine months time but one in four marketers are still only in the planning stage of ensuring compliance.

The post Almost three in four global marketers still unaware of full GDPR implications appeared first on Marketing Week.

Tanya Joseph: Stop treating women as accessories and recognise their purchasing power

by Tanya Joseph @ Marketing Week

Women play minor roles in ad campaigns in a variety of sectors from automotive to utilities, missing their decisive influence in the purchase process.

The post Tanya Joseph: Stop treating women as accessories and recognise their purchasing power appeared first on Marketing Week.

CanOWater on its hopes to take canned water mainstream

by Leonie Roderick @ Marketing Week

The water brand is hoping to solve the world’s plastic problem by 'building a cult of people' who will encourage others to switch from bottles to aluminium cans.

The post CanOWater on its hopes to take canned water mainstream appeared first on Marketing Week.

Dove's Campaign for Real Customers

Dove's Campaign for Real Customers


1to1 Media

Faced with lackluster marketing and slipping sales figures at the hands of Procter & Gamble and other competitors, the brand managers at Unilever's Dove started asking how they could reinvigorate the brand.

John Lewis says Christmas offer must be ‘irresistible’ amid weaker consumer demand

by Thomas Hobbs @ Marketing Week

The retail giant says consumer demand for big-ticket purchases is now ‘more difficult', putting more pressure on the John Lewis Christmas campaign to succeed.

The post John Lewis says Christmas offer must be ‘irresistible’ amid weaker consumer demand appeared first on Marketing Week.

Represent Communications and Get Interactive partner to expand their native advertising output

by Gašper @ Marketing magazin

Borislav Miljanović (pictured), CEO of Represent Communications, describes the partnership as a logical consequence of many years of work in the field of communications and public relations. “We recognised Get Interactive as a reliable partner with many years of experience in native advertising in the Slovenian market, which provides us with technological and expert support, […]

The post Represent Communications and Get Interactive partner to expand their native advertising output appeared first on Marketing magazin.

Mark Ritson: Spreadsheet jockeys are misunderstanding the marketing funnel

by Mark Ritson @ Marketing Week

Too many people are confusing the marketing funnel, thinking it is all about marketers when really it's all about the consumer.

The post Mark Ritson: Spreadsheet jockeys are misunderstanding the marketing funnel appeared first on Marketing Week.

Corona, Innocent and AEG on what it takes to launch a music festival

by Thomas Hobbs @ Marketing Week

As the Summer festival season comes to a close, Marketing Week asks marketers whether it’s worth the risk trying to create the next Glastonbury.

The post Corona, Innocent and AEG on what it takes to launch a music festival appeared first on Marketing Week.

Fifth SoMo Borac receives record number of entries

by Gašper @ Marketing magazin

The most entries have been submitted in SoMo Social (25) while Digital Mix sees 24 entries. 22 projects are competing in SoMo Content. “We are very pleased to receive a large number of entries in all categories,” remarks Ružica Vrdoljak Ličina, co-organizer of SoMo Borac. “We are especially happy about 16 entries in the category […]

The post Fifth SoMo Borac receives record number of entries appeared first on Marketing magazin.

A U.S. Nonprofit Is Funding the Fight to Imprison Women for Abortions in El Salvador

A U.S. Nonprofit Is Funding the Fight to Imprison Women for Abortions in El Salvador

by Christina Cauterucci @ The XX Factor

A U.S. anti-abortion nonprofit is funding the fight against legal abortion in El Salvador, funneling between tens and hundreds of thousands of dollars to an organization that supports the Central American country’s punishing laws. Reproductive-rights activists are currently rallying behind a bill that would allow for abortions in cases of rape, nonviable fetuses, and life-threatening health complications. Since 1998, abortions have been prohibited by law under all circumstances in the country—by most accounts, the world’s strictest abortion ban.

The Guardian reports that Human Life International, a Virginia-based Catholic nonprofit, has financially supported Sí a la Vida, one of the major Salvadoran organizations behind the total abortion ban, since 2000. Between 2000 and 2007, according to the Guardian’s reporting, Human Life International gave Sí a la Vida $47,360; between 2008 and 2014, Human Life International sent $615,432 to “Central American causes,” which likely included Sí a la Vida, as Human Life International has identified the organization as its “representative in El Salvador” and “affiliate” in the country.

Sí a la Vida is still one of the biggest forces behind the opposition to any changes to the country’s abortion laws. Under the current policy, women are routinely jailed for miscarriages, since there’s no way to tell the difference between a natural stillbirth and a medically induced termination. In 2013, the case of a pregnant Salvadoran 22-year-old with a young son, lupus, and kidney failure made international headlines when she couldn’t get an abortion, even though her anencephalic fetus was nonviable. She was eventually given a Cesarean section when she was in critical condition, and the baby, predictably, died soon after. When Salvadoran women are prosecuted for having a miscarriage or getting an illicit abortion, they can be put away for years. Recently, a 19-year-old survivor of rape was convicted of “aggravated homicide” and sentenced to 30 years in prison for a stillbirth.

Human Life International leaders bankroll the advocates who lobby in support of this sadistic policy, but in public, they deny supporting punishment for women who seek abortions. “The woman who aborts usually does not have the knowledge about pre-born life or what an abortion really is,” wrote Human Life International leader Adolfo J. Castañeda in a 2007 piece titled “Women Who Have Abortions Should Get Help, Compassion Not Prison.” “If she is severely penalized by the law, chances are that will make it more difficult for her to come forward to be healed and reconciled.” The Guardian quotes another Human Life International leader as writing that “desperate women being pushed into abortion” should not be imprisoned for their actions.

These patronizing arguments are common among anti-abortion activists, who know that moderate women are less likely to support prosecuting women for things they do to their own bodies. But when abortion is illegal, punishment of women is inevitable. Women in the U.S. are already jailed for home abortion attempts, and abortion is legal in many circumstances in this country. Donald Trump ran up against this weird anti-abortion movement contradiction during his campaign, when he said women should be punished for getting abortions if abortion were outlawed. Mainstream right-to-lifers tugged their collars and tiptoed away from that statement, gently correcting the candidate. Still, 39 percent of Trump voters polled in December said women should be punished for abortions, and some anti-abortion organizations are trying to get abortion outlawed as first-degree murder in certain states. The El Salvador model isn’t too far from what the U.S. could expect if, say Roe v. Wade were overturned, allowing states to ban abortions within their borders.

If that happened, groups like Human Life International, which also supported Uganda’s far-reaching criminalization of gay people, would be well prepared to argue for putting “desperate women” in prison for terminating their pregnancies. “Abortion always destroys a life. There is nothing life-saving about it,” Human Life International President Shenan J. Boquet said in 2013, supporting the continued withholding of abortion care for the 22-year-old Salvadoran with lupus and kidney disease. The penal code he envisions lets women die in pregnancy, but calls them killers if they care for their own health and get an abortion.

Dove teams up with Shonda Rhimes on Real Beauty campaign

Dove teams up with Shonda Rhimes on Real Beauty campaign


latimes.com

Dove Real Beauty Productions will highlight how everyday women think Hollywood should portray real beauty.

Check Out Dove’s New ‘Real Beauty’ Campaign

Check Out Dove’s New ‘Real Beauty’ Campaign


Fortune

It’s confusing a lot of people.

The Best of Global Digital Marketing in Manila, The Philippines

by Best Marketing @ Best Marketing

21st July 2016 In cooperation with Adobo Magazine  

The Best of Global Digital Marketing in Warsaw, Poland

by Best Marketing @ Best Marketing

26th April 2016 In cooperation with NoNoobs.pl

How To Go Viral On LinkedIn: 22 Tips From The LinkedIn Pros

by Si Quan Ong @ Word-of-Mouth and Referral Marketing Blog

The story started simple. It started with a request from Dave: “Yo SQ, let’s try to figure out if we could get traffic from LinkedIn back to the blog.” This one question led me down the rabbit hole of LinkedIn marketing — and in turn figuring out how to go viral, get traffic and build a brand. […]

The post How To Go Viral On LinkedIn: 22 Tips From The LinkedIn Pros appeared first on Word-of-Mouth and Referral Marketing Blog.

8 Reasons to Believe Taylor Swift Was Inside the Box That Two Large Men Carried Out of Her Apartment

8 Reasons to Believe Taylor Swift Was Inside the Box That Two Large Men Carried Out of Her Apartment

by Heather Schwedel @ The XX Factor

On Monday, Splash News, an agency that specializes in celebrity news and photos, released a picture of some men on a New York City street loading a large case into a vehicle. What interest would a celebrity photo agency have in this sidewalk scene? According to a caption that went along with the photo, plenty: The men happened to be Taylor Swift’s security force, they were outside the pop star’s Tribeca apartment, and she was reportedly inside the case.

Per BuzzFeed, the mysterious caption read in full ([sic] to all spelling mistakes):

Taylor Swift has been reportedly being transported in a huge suitcase from her Tribecca apartment into her truck. A fleet of cars including two large cadillacs and three suv's arrive at Tailor Swift's apartment in Tribecca to move a large suitcase from apartment to truck. Almost a dozen of Taylor Swift security guards were present to move this package carefully as Taylor Swift remains to be unseen for a long time.

The agency soon retracted the caption. But Pandora’s box was opened, and the theory was out there: Taylor Swift! In a box! In the annals of memorable celebrity modes of transport, it would be hard to top Lady Gaga’s egg and Ariana Grande’s rumored preference for being carried like a baby, but if Swift was indeed inside that box, then the Trojan Horse would have nothing on her. And knowing Swift, despite the retraction, it’s not totally out of the realm of possibility. Let’s marshal the evidence.

Swift has been trying to keep a low profile lately.

Holing up in a box would be one creative way to avoid the paparazzi’s gaze. On that theme, she’s barely made any public appearances in recent months, and she hasn’t released a new album since 2014’s 1989 (though she did have a song on the 50 Shades Darker soundtrack). The star has spoken before about overexposure, and after last summer’s war with Kanye West and Kim Kardashian and the end of her relationship with Tom Hiddleston, disappearing for a while made a certain amount of sense for her career. But how far would she go to disappear? Would she, say, hide in a large suitcase?

Do not underestimate her will and determination.

This is a woman who has smashed record after record, who collects squad members like trophies, and who elaborately engineered a public image so glossy that it felt like a historic feat of self-mythologizing.

Swift is not too big to fit in a box.

She’s on the tall side at 5-foot-10, I’ll grant you. That’s a lot of height to squeeze into a box. But she has a small frame and appears to be in excellent shape—you’ve seen all those stylish gym clothes she wears around. If she does any Pilates or yoga at all, which she definitely does, she can swing this.

To test out this theory, a Slate staffer (associate art director Lisa Larson-Walker) who is similar in size to Swift curled into the fetal position and we measured her.

We then compared her measurements to the dimensions of some of the cases sold on high-quality protective case manufacturer Pelican’s site, and the numbers check out. Lisa is 17" wide, 19" high, give or take lid compression, and 33–35" long, depending how much her feet are sticking out.

The suitcase itself is huge.

Rather than the type of luggage you can fit in the overhead compartment on a plane, it’s a monster protective case. Here's one plausible example: It's 28.20" x 19.66" x 17.63", so a lithe, contorted pop star could ride in relative comfort.

The company, and surely companies like it, manufactures custom cases, too: This one could totally be lined with foam and outfitted with airholes to make the chart-topping artist traveling inside more comfortable.

The case has wheels but instead of being rolled, it is being carried by two men.

A pair of human shock absorbers.

Look at the orange tape in the picture: possible airhole location No. 1?

Or just a reminder of which side has to go down so they don’t flip over the pop star inside? Or just random orange tape? All plausible!

Wait, though—if Swift’s whole reason for getting in the box was to hide from the public, how did Splash News find out?

Perhaps it was actually a bid for attention and she was only pretending to hide, a nesting doll of PR stunts but in no way too advanced a move for Swift to pull. Again, look who we’re dealing with.

When everything looks smaller

by Gašper @ Marketing magazin

Vitaminka introduced a new product – Magnus Stobi Flips -, enriched with 30% of peanuts, making each crunchy bite tastier than ever. This time, through the platform “so big that everything else looks small,” the company is communicating its message to a wider audience, especially among younger. TV ad features young Macedonian actresses Natasa Petrovic, Eva Skenderovska […]

The post When everything looks smaller appeared first on Marketing magazin.

Best Cause Marketing Examples | Successful Campaigns

Best Cause Marketing Examples | Successful Campaigns


CauseGood

These best-in-class cause marketing examples are sure provide you the inspiration you need to launch a successful campaign of your own.

5 Marketing Ideas for Wedding Photographers

by admin @ Elevate Promo

During a time when anyone with a camera (which is everyone) considers themselves a photographer, it can be hard to set yourself apart as a professional. Additionally, if you’re an independent event photographer, you have a lot of work to do besides the photography itself. One of the hardest things is learning how to market […]

Life’s too short to not change your job

by Gašper @ Marketing magazin

According to the agency, the main idea lies behind an insight that more than 80 percent of Serbians are frustrated with their current job. Job change presents the fourth biggest change in their life. How to encourage the individuals to get their life in order and change their job. The campaign features well known figures from […]

The post Life’s too short to not change your job appeared first on Marketing magazin.

Parents, Don’t Let Your Girls Join the Boy Scouts

Parents, Don’t Let Your Girls Join the Boy Scouts

by Christina Cauterucci @ The XX Factor

The Boy Scouts of America are conducting a “covert campaign” to get girls into their programs, according to a stern letter the Girl Scouts of the USA sent the Boy Scouts board on Monday. The letter, obtained by BuzzFeed, says that the BSA’s plan would "result in fundamentally undercutting [the] Girl Scouts.” A BSA spokeswoman confirmed that the organization has been “exploring the benefits of bringing Scouting to every member of the family—boys and girls,” though no final decisions have been made.

If BSA leaders are considering admitting girls to boost membership numbers, as the Girl Scouts allege, can you blame them? The group is one of the best-known civic organizations in the country, but it only markets to half the population in its target age group. Little girls and parents have accused BSA of engaging in gender discrimination, pushing for the organization to let kids of any gender join a troop and earn merit badges like any other scout. And with the public-relations deficit BSA has racked up with its ban on gay leaders (which they recently reversed after much criticism) and its chillingly warm reception for Donald Trump, the Boy Scouts could use a highly publicized, progressive win.

None of that makes girls in the Boy Scouts a good idea. The organizations were founded on two very different visions of gender in America. While BSA began as a response to turn-of-the-century worries that rugged American boys were becoming urbane weaklings, GSUSA began soon after as a space for girls to explore the adventuresome, outdoorsy sides of themselves that were discouraged by mainstream society. The Boy Scouts were affiliated with a different girls’ organization for a time: the Campfire Girls, which represented a more traditional gender paradigm with an emphasis on domestic handiwork. If the Boy Scouts were founded to tether boys to stringent gender norms, the Girl Scouts were founded to challenge them.

Ever since then, GSUSA has helped girls exercise their power and test their capabilities in a space set apart from the boys by whose skill sets they might otherwise measure their own accomplishments. When girls don’t have to worry about how they’ll look if they perform a task better or worse than a boy, they’re more likely to explore the far reaches of their own potential. They also get opportunities that are harder to find in organizations where boys make up the majority—or even minority—of participants. When girls and young women must occupy all leadership roles, girls and young women learn how to lead.

According to the letter GSUSA sent to BSA leadership, the organization is considering gender-neutralizing some of its programs to appeal to millennial parents, who may see less value in signing their boys up for single-gender activities. In the U.S., much to the chagrin of men’s rights groups, most men-only colleges and civic organizations have started accepting women, while many women-only groups have resisted such integration. Perhaps young parents don’t want their kids associated with a group known for its history of regressive politics, or maybe they don’t think their boys need the roughening-and-toughening of an organized boys’ club that hasn’t much changed since their fathers were scouts in the ’60s. (The Girl Scouts, in contrast, have readily evolved with the times in both curriculum and stances on social issues.)

If boys have a special, specific need today, it’s not for a group that reinforces traditionally masculine behaviors and activities. The biggest benefit kids can get out of a single-gender social group is a chance to experience life outside the confines of ubiquitous gender dynamics. The 21st century doesn’t need Boy Scout troops with girls in them. It needs a Boy Scout curriculum that challenges and expands traditional notions of masculinity, doing for boys what GSUSA has done for girls. Instead of chipping away at the Girl Scouts’ membership, the Boy Scouts should heed its example.

Aviva campaign designed to ‘make Britain’s roads safer’ banned for promoting dangerous driving

by Thomas Hobbs @ Marketing Week

Both Aviva and Renault have been hit with bans after the ASA ruled that both had glamourised dangerous driving with "irresponsible" advertising campaigns.

The post Aviva campaign designed to ‘make Britain’s roads safer’ banned for promoting dangerous driving appeared first on Marketing Week.

6 Tips for E-Commerce Copywriting

by admin @ Baer Performance Marketing – Green Bay, WI

On the surface, writing product descriptions sounds like a simple enough task. However, even the most seasoned copywriter can fall prey to a common mistake: writing a description that only describes a product. Product descriptions are to be thought of as a sales tool. Customers need to know why they should buy the product. A […]

The post 6 Tips for E-Commerce Copywriting appeared first on Baer Performance Marketing - Green Bay, WI.

Dove experiments with weather sensitive billboard in ‘April Showers’ campaign

Dove experiments with weather sensitive billboard in ‘April Showers’ campaign


The Drum

Dove, Unilever's personal care brand, unveiled a first-of-a-kind responsive ad in Times Square in April, which saw a digital billboard react to live changes in the weather.

Dove's latest advert criticised for painting negative picture of public breastfeeding

Dove's latest advert criticised for painting negative picture of public breastfeeding


HOLA

Baby Dove has been criticised for controversial new adverts, which fans of the brand say paints a negative image of breastfeeding in public

France Is Trying to Decide Whether Being a First Lady Should Be a Real Job Or Not

France Is Trying to Decide Whether Being a First Lady Should Be a Real Job Or Not

by Christina Cauterucci @ The XX Factor

French President Emmanuel Macron wants his wife to do more than sit next to him at fancy dinners and endure the leering compliments of fellow heads of state. Brigitte Macron would like a more formal position in government than one merely requiring her to smile at her husband when the photographers come out. The French public is seemingly not so sure.

A Change.org petition that started a few weeks ago has garnered nearly 300,000 signatures from people who don’t want the first lady to get an official public title and office, as the president has proposed. The author of the petition, Thierry Paul Valette, says Macron’s desire to install his unelected wife in an official role is hypocritical in light of his repeated calls to rid politics of corruption. The French legislature was in the process of banning nepotism in parliament at Macron’s encouragement, Valette writes, while the president planned to give Brigitte Macron a real title ("Première Dame,"), a new budget of public funds, and an expanded role in the affairs of the executive branch. CNN reports that the Macron administration “appears to have…abandoned” the plan as vocal opposition mounted.

Macron campaigned in part on a vision of ethical leadership, which some say conflicted with his first-lady proposal. The petition asks that the question giving the first lady’s position a budget and greater influence be put to a public referendum rather than left to Macron’s sole discretion. The public isn’t so hot on Macron at the moment: His approval ratings hover in the mid-30s just three months after his electoral victory, in part because of budget cuts that spurred the resignation of the head of the French armed forces. Detractors accuse Macron of displaying authoritarian and even monarchical behavior, ignoring advisors and avoiding journalists amid calls for greater transparency. During Macron’s campaign, one of his fellow candidates, François Fillon, was accused of embezzling hundreds of thousands of Euros by paying his wife and two children for fictitious jobs over a period of multiple decades. Though Brigitte Macron reportedly would not have accepted a salary for the role she and her husband were trying to create, it looked too close to the intrafamily status-boosting of his one-time opponent.

The spouses of French presidents already get special security, hired assistants, and office space, but they don’t have any official status, significant staff, or defined role in the French constitution. French-Algerian journalist Nabila Ramdani claims that giving Brigitte Macron a title and a go-ahead to do more work would not vastly increase the budget already devoted to the first lady’s needs. Instead, Ramdani believes, the opposition to Macron’s plans rests on the sexist notion that a political wife should know her place, far away from the big kids’ table. “The Brigitte Macron I interviewed during her husband’s electoral campaign was uninterested in making money, or having more flunkies around her,” Ramdani writes. “She was not in the slightest bit pushy or personally ambitious. On the contrary, the retired teacher wanted to be taken seriously as a well-educated and highly experienced public servant.” Opponents of a larger role for Brigitte Macron “want to reduce her to another upstart who should be locked away in a quiet salon while her man sorts out domestic and world affairs.”

It sounds like the first lady role into which Brigitte Macron would have ascended only differed from her current role with a couple of capital letters—she would be First Lady, not first lady. And the extent of her work would have been explicitly “public,” not “political”—more along the lines of a Michelle Obama or Laura Bush, with their speeches and agreeable causes, than a Hillary Clinton, who had a legislative agenda, or an Ivanka Trump, who stands in for the president at major diplomatic meet-ups and serves as a close adviser.

Part of the French public’s objection to an expanded first lady role was undoubtedly symbolic: What would it mean for a president’s family to acquire unearned status from his position? Part may have been confusion: Macron merely asked for a proposal that would lay out a more formal, defined job for his wife, and no one quite knew how her position would change or what she might gain. The U.S. is used to first ladies taking active roles in their husbands’ administrations; in fact, the seeming uninterestedness and deliberate ornamentalism of our current one is a shocking departure from what has become the norm. As journalists monitor the promotion of unqualified family members in our current White House, it may be hard to decipher the differences between an indifferent spouse and a woman who’s been told to keep quiet, or a robust first-ladyship and a wife reaping political benefits she didn’t earn. Debates over the role of a 21st-century president’s wife are worth having. France won’t get past the opening arguments if Brigitte Macron doesn’t get a chance to try something different.

Shock Tactics: PR Genius?

by FormediaPR @ Formedia | PR - Marketing - Design - Web » Formedia | PR - Marketing - Design - Web |

Encouraging Debate Two years ago, Protein World’s Marketing Manager, Richard Staveley, sparked a global social media storm with its “Are you beach ready?” campaign, with people accusing the company of sexism and body shaming. Fast track to today and the marketer has launched a new...

Why Dove's 'Real Beauty' marketing campaign falls flat

Why Dove's 'Real Beauty' marketing campaign falls flat


Pressure Sensitive Products

Dove's latest "Real Beauty" commercial doesn't get the message across as effectively as previous campaigns, according to marketers. 

Advantage Announces Acquisition of Award-Winning Consumer Marketing Agency Upshot

by Katelyn Stokes @ Advantage Marketing Partners

IRVINE, CA – Advantage Solutions (Advantage) announced today its acquisition of Upshot, an industry-leading, consumer marketing agency based in Chicago. The addition of Upshot to Advantage Solutions will create a comprehensive end-to-end brand marketing capability that enables clients to optimize brand activation and the journey to purchase. Terms of the transaction were not disclosed. Upshot will continue operating under...

The post Advantage Announces Acquisition of Award-Winning Consumer Marketing Agency Upshot appeared first on Advantage Marketing Partners.

How to Take a Risk in Business Without Being Risky

by admin @ Baer Performance Marketing – Green Bay, WI

Blog post by: Drew Rhodes, Baer Performance Marketing Intern   In business, you have a product or a service, and your goal is to differentiate yourself from competitors in your market. If your market is crowded, and you, as a business, are repeating the same selling points as your competitors, your business will get lost […]

The post How to Take a Risk in Business Without Being Risky appeared first on Baer Performance Marketing - Green Bay, WI.

Dove

Dove


Unilever global company website

Dove is committed to helping women realise their personal potential for beauty by engaging them with products that deliver real care.

About Dove

About Dove


Dove US

Find out more about our vision to help make beauty a source of confidence, not anxiety, here.

Ad Age Names IN Marketing #1 Largest Promotions and Experiential/ Event Marketing Agency in the U.S.

by Katelyn Stokes @ Advantage Marketing Partners

Ad Age has named the agency the #1 U.S. Promotions Agency and the #1 largest U.S. Experiential/ Event Marketing Agency.

The post Ad Age Names IN Marketing #1 Largest Promotions and Experiential/ Event Marketing Agency in the U.S. appeared first on Advantage Marketing Partners.

Good Campaign of the Week: Under Armour “Unlike Any”

by D&AD @ Brandingmag

No brand quite does empowerment like Under Armour. It makes sense that a brand the sells sportswear would want to partner with sports personalities, but Under Armour seems to get beneath the surface of what makes these sports stars who they are, and this is undoubtedly their USP. In this latest campaign, “Unlike Any” celebrates […]

5 Ways to Improve Internal Communication at Your Business

by admin @ Baer Performance Marketing – Green Bay, WI

  Analyzing marketing and communication from an external perspective is a priority for most business owners. However, it’s just as important to evaluate the success of internal communication. This is because employees are your most loyal brand advocates! And to the surprise of many business owners, employees in 2017 are no longer satisfied with just receiving a […]

The post 5 Ways to Improve Internal Communication at Your Business appeared first on Baer Performance Marketing - Green Bay, WI.

Global Headline Makers: Stephane Wargnier (Petit Bateau, France)

by Gašper @ Marketing magazin

In France, Petit Bateau is one of those revered brands that belongs in the sacrosanct territory of childhood. The children’s clothing and underwear maker was founded in 1893, which means that every living generation has worn it, bought it and seen its advertising. Even its agency, BETC, has worked for the brand for more than […]

The post Global Headline Makers: Stephane Wargnier (Petit Bateau, France) appeared first on Marketing magazin.

Apple, Nike, BT Sport: The top 10 YouTube ads in August

by Leonie Roderick @ Marketing Week

The most popular ads on YouTube last month included Dwayne ‘The Rock’ Johnson teaming up with Apple’s Siri and Nike exploring what goes into an athlete’s smile.

The post Apple, Nike, BT Sport: The top 10 YouTube ads in August appeared first on Marketing Week.

Ted Cruz’s New Chill, Sex-Positive Persona Is All Well and Good. It’s Also Preposterous.

Ted Cruz’s New Chill, Sex-Positive Persona Is All Well and Good. It’s Also Preposterous.

by Ruth Graham @ The XX Factor

Pity Ted Cruz. No one likes the guy. (“I just don’t like the guy”—George W. Bush) He’s spent the last few weeks being called out for his hypocrisy over hurricane aid. And now, just when he’d rather be selling his tax reform plan, he has spent almost an entire week talking about a pornographic tweet.

It is by now the stuff of legend: On Monday evening, Cruz’s official Twitter account clicked “like” on a tweet featuring hardcore porn, causing the tweet from account @SexuallPosts to show up on a section of Cruz’s public profile. Speculation ran wild, including at Slate. Did Cruz himself hit the like button? Did a staffer do it, and under what circumstances? On Tuesday, Cruz called it a “staffing issue,” furthering the story without clarifying it. Concerned watchdogs like CNN’s Chris Cillizza put Cruz on notice, treating the errant finger-twitch like the matter of national security that it was: “Cruz needs to clear this up. Immediately. Possibly sooner.” On Wednesday, he cleared it up—or at least tried to. In an interview with CNN’s Dana Bash, he said a staff member “accidentally hit the wrong button.”

Cruz seems to be in a forgiving mood toward the mystery staffer. He called it an “honest mistake” and said he wouldn’t throw the “fella” under the bus by revealing his name. Then again, Cruz is a forgiving guy: Then-candidate Donald Trump insulted his wife’s appearance and insinuated that his father was involved in the Kennedy assassination, and Cruz still endorsed him.

But the interview was notable for more than just Cruz’s awkward attempts to move past SexuallPosts-gate. When Bash brought up a 2007 case in which Cruz, then Texas solicitor general, defended a state law banning the sale of sex toys, Cruz got huffy. He called the ban a “stupid law” and said he only defended it because it was his job to do so. “Consenting adults should be able to do whatever they want in their bedrooms,” he said. “The media and the left seem obsessed with sex. Let people do what they want!”

Cruz’s newfound persona as a chill, sex-positive free spirit is all well and good. But back in 2007, Cruz showed no sign of thinking that the Texas sales ban on dildos and vibrators was “idiotic,” as he told Bash. His team filed a 76-page brief arguing that Americans have no right “to stimulate one’s genitals for non-medical purposes unrelated to procreation or outside of an interpersonal relationship.” When a court of appeals panel struck down Cruz’s argument in a 2–1 decision in 2008, the judges in the majority noted that the case was very specifically about controlling what consenting adults do in their own bedrooms: “It is about controlling what people do in the privacy of their own homes because the State is morally opposed to a certain type of consensual private intimate conduct.” After his loss, Cruz and the state’s attorney general (now-Gov. Greg Abbott) asked the full court of appeals to hear the case, and Cruz’s office filed another brief suggesting it might take the case—defending what he now calls a “stupid law”—to the Supreme Court.

Meanwhile, Cruz’s approach to LGBTQ issues also does not suggest a mellow disinterest in other people’s bedroom habits. During his 2012 Senate campaign, he criticized his opponent for marching in a pride parade as Dallas mayor, saying it’s “not a statement I agree with.” He spoke publicly during that campaign about his record of “standing and fighting to protect traditional marriage between one man and one woman.” In the run-up to the 2016 election, he told NPR that opposition to same-sex marriage would be “front and center” in his campaign. Except he also he assured a gay-rights supporter at a private fundraiser that he would not make fighting same-sex marriage a top priority. That’s Ted Cruz: Consenting adults can do what they want behind closed doors as long as it’s politically convenient for him.

In A Far Far Away Land: 18 Proven Storytelling Formulas That Will 2x Word-Of-Mouth For Your Brand

by Si Quan Ong @ Word-of-Mouth and Referral Marketing Blog

On a beautiful spring afternoon, ten years ago, two young men graduated from the same college. They were very much alike, these two young men. Both had been better than average students, both were personable and both — as young college graduates are — were filled with ambitious dreams for the future. Recently, these men returned to their college […]

The post In A Far Far Away Land: 18 Proven Storytelling Formulas That Will 2x Word-Of-Mouth For Your Brand appeared first on Word-of-Mouth and Referral Marketing Blog.

Good Campaign of the Week: Dove "Real Beauty Bottles"

Good Campaign of the Week: Dove "Real Beauty Bottles"


Brandingmag

Dove’s body wash gets a revamp with a little help from Ogilvy, by creating bottles that come in all shapes and sizes, just like the women in their ads.

Good Campaign of the Week: Keep Going #LikeAGirl

by D&AD @ Brandingmag

Always have proven once again that they are part of a unique collection of brands that care about young girls as well as selling products with their latest “#LikeAGirl” campaign. The multi-award-winning, original campaign came out three years ago, and it could have been enough to cement the brand as a clever and innovative thinker. […]

John Lewis, Disney & Morrisons: 5 things that mattered this week and why

by Rebecca Aston @ Marketing Week

Catch up on all the important marketing news from the week including Disney's bid for digital ad dollars and John Lewis's focus on social media.

The post John Lewis, Disney & Morrisons: 5 things that mattered this week and why appeared first on Marketing Week.

Your killer media pitch

by Mary Charleson @ Five-Minute Marketing

This week I promised to follow up on the “marketing with media” theme, and offer a template for your killer media pitch. If you want to review last weeks post on writing effective subject lines to get editors attention (frankly the key to ensuring your pitch actually gets opened) you can link to it HERE. […]

Dove's ridiculous new body wash bottles are the apotheosis of its "real beauty" campaigns

Dove's ridiculous new body wash bottles are the apotheosis of its "real beauty" campaigns


Quartz

All soap bottles—I mean, women—are beautiful as they are.

5 Ways to Communicate Better at Work

by admin @ Baer Performance Marketing – Green Bay, WI

Like many fields in today’s workplace, marketing is collaborative. If you’re employed by an agency, you will likely find yourself working very closely with colleagues. This provides an excellent opportunity to learn from others while expanding your skill set, but it’s possible you’ll hit a few bumps in the road. Differences in personality and the […]

The post 5 Ways to Communicate Better at Work appeared first on Baer Performance Marketing - Green Bay, WI.

There Are Lots of Women Running for Governor Right Now, and Some of Them Are Very, Very Bad

There Are Lots of Women Running for Governor Right Now, and Some of Them Are Very, Very Bad

by Christina Cauterucci @ The XX Factor

Much has been made of the gender imbalance in the U.S. Congress, where just 21 percent of senators and 19.3 percent of representatives are women. But the country’s record for governors is even worse: Only six women currently hold their states’ top executive office, and the most female governors the U.S. has ever had at one time is nine.

That gives the current slate of female gubernatorial candidates a decent chance of making history. If she wins her 2018 campaign, Stacey Abrams, the Democratic minority leader of the Georgia General Assembly, would be the state’s first female governor. She would also be the state Democratic Party’s first female gubernatorial candidate and the country’s first black female governor.

Then there are the Republicans. Three women are currently competing with two men for the GOP nomination in the governor’s race in Tennessee, which has had neither a female governor nor a female gubernatorial nominee from a major party. All three of the female candidates have been hardworking opponents of reproductive rights. Beth Harwell has taken up the cause of several abortion restrictions as the speaker of the state’s House of Representatives, including mandatory waiting periods and mandatory pre-abortion counseling. Mae Beavers, a state senator, was the primary sponsor behind a mandatory ultrasound bill and a ban on abortions performed after 20 weeks of pregnancy.

Rep. Diane Black was the latest to enter the Tennessee race this week with a video seemingly crafted to counter the perception of women as too wishy-washy or fragile to properly hold executive leadership offices. In her video, Black uses metaphors of war and violence to describe just how not-fragile she is. She blasts “weak-kneed” members of her own party, claims most politicians are “too meek, or maybe even too weak” to “fight for the right things,” and promises to focus on “beating the liberals instead of caving into them.” “In Tennessee, we’re conservative, and we do things the right way, no matter what Hollywood or Washington thinks about it,” she says in the clip. “We believe in absolute truths: Right is right, wrong is wrong, truth is truth, God is God, and a life is a life.”

Black loves lives-that-are-lives so much, she has made disrupting women’s health care one of her primary goals in Congress. On her website, “Defunding Planned Parenthood” has its own page, in addition to and separate from the page titled “Pro-Life,” which shows the Congresswoman cuddling an infant. She accuses Planned Parenthood of being part of “the big abortion industry’s trafficking of baby body parts for profit.” In 2015 and 2016, she was an active member of the House’s investigative panel formed in the wake of the Center for Medical Progress’ videos that claimed to show fetal tissue trafficking. (They did not, and the producers were later indicted for identity theft and charged with several felonies.) Black has also introduced bills to prevent Planned Parenthood from getting federal family-planning grants and getting reimbursed for services provided to Medicaid patients.

In South Carolina, an equally hardcore right-wing woman is running for governor. Catherine Templeton, who headed up a couple of state agencies under Gov. Nikki Haley, gave a few alarming answers to questions posed at a GOP town hall this week, one of her first major events since announcing her candidacy in the spring. She promised to stand in the way of any efforts to remove monuments of Confederate soldiers, saying she was proud of the Confederacy and doesn’t “care whose feelings it hurts.” Of transgender soldiers serving in the military, Templeton said “If you sign up and join as a man, you serve as a man. If you join as a woman, you serve as a woman,” and, likewise, “If you’re a boy, you go to the boys room. If you’re a girl, you go to the little girls’ room.” And, she added, “if you’re a pervert, we throw you in jail and throw away the keys.” She didn’t clarify what she meant by “pervert.”

The moderator also asked Templeton about abortion rights in the state. “Until we can overturn Roe v. Wade, the best we can do is restrict it as much as possible,” he said. “How far can we take those restrictions? What’s the next step to make it—to protect life?”

Templeton responded with a story about carrying her now-middle-school-aged twins, boasting that she never considered aborting one of the fetuses, even when she developed “a life-threatening illness brought on by pregnancy.” She is “the only girl running” for governor in South Carolina, she said, so the question is “personal” for her. “You’re not going to find anybody that’s more pro-life than I am,” Templeton went on, explaining that she only supports exceptions in cases of incest and a threat to the life of the pregnant woman. One audience member asked Templeton to reassess her support of the incest exception, because a fetus conceived in incest “doesn’t deserve to be killed just because of the sin of the parents.” Templeton nodded. “And that’s why I’m not for the rape exception,” she said. “We agree.”

The same audience member asked the candidate about “homosexuality and transgenders,” claiming that “God says it’s wrong and it should be wrong in the law.” Templeton didn’t challenge the attendee’s assessment of the “sin” of LGBTQ people, but again invoked her love of her children, as if queer and trans South Carolinians pose a threat to their well-being.

Templeton, Black, and their kin aside, there are plenty of worthy female candidates running for governor in 2018. Democrat Gretchen Whitmer, a former Michigan state Senate leader with a history of reproductive-rights activism, has broken fundraising records in her gubernatorial campaign. In May, she’d attracted about three times the number of donors as her Democratic competitor, though he’s since been closing the gap. Kate Brown, who in 2016 won a special two-year term as Oregon’s governor, was as the country’s first openly-LGBTQ person to win a gubernatorial election. (She’s bisexual.) And gender-equity advocates can celebrate the 16,000 women who’ve asked EMILY’s List about running for office since the election. The Democratic Party itself may be cool with funneling money toward politicians who vow to curb abortion rights, but EMILY’s List only supports female candidates who are pro-choice.

Update, August 7, 2017: This post has been amended with updated fundraising information on the Michigan governor’s race.

Dove Marketing Mix (4Ps) | MBA Skool-Study.Learn.Share.

Dove Marketing Mix (4Ps) | MBA Skool-Study.Learn.Share.


MBA Skool-Study.Learn.Share.

Marketing Mix of Dove analyses the brand/company which covers 4Ps (Product, Price, Place, Promotion). Dove marketing mix explains the business & marketing strategies of the brand.

How university partnerships are helping brands attract the best talent

by Charlotte Rogers @ Marketing Week

Businesses partnering with universities to offer value-added opportunities for students are reaping the rewards when it comes to futureproofing the quality of their workforce.

The post How university partnerships are helping brands attract the best talent appeared first on Marketing Week.

Robin Bonn: Don’t miss out as agencies finally toughen-up

by Robin Bonn @ Marketing Week

Smart agencies are taking responsibility; rethinking their lemming-like, pitch-for-anything behaviour. Marketers must press the reset button too, says Robin Bonn, founder of Co:definery.

The post Robin Bonn: Don’t miss out as agencies finally toughen-up appeared first on Marketing Week.

55 agencies with 120 projects enter BalCannes 2017

by Gašper @ Marketing magazin

This year’s BalCannes entries will be judged by separate panels of judges, consisting of marketers (clients), journalists and agency representatives. As every year, the best 25 campaigns will be chosen among submitted entries. Yet for the first time in BalCannes history, top 25 list will be presented by each of three juries on 22 September […]

The post 55 agencies with 120 projects enter BalCannes 2017 appeared first on Marketing magazin.

How L’Oréal Became a Top Global Beauty Brand

by Monique Danao @ Word-of-Mouth and Referral Marketing Blog

L’Oréal is one of the world’s top beauty brands. In fact, Forbes estimates that it’s worth $107.5 billion! How does the brand maintain its seat at the top? In part, through innovations in technology, beauty and advertising. 1. Makeup.com – publishes great articles and social media posts A quick look at L’Oréal’s Makeup.com reveals beauty […]

The post How L’Oréal Became a Top Global Beauty Brand appeared first on Word-of-Mouth and Referral Marketing Blog.

Amazon signs deal for NYC advertising office

by @ Marketing Dive - Latest News

The e-commerce giant has leased space in Five Manhattan West for its advertising division, along with teams for marketing, product design and engineering.

New Video: 3 Causes of Marketing Colony Collapse

by Lisa Nirell @ EnergizeGrowth

You may have heard about Bee Colony Collapse, which has generated great concern among noted scientists. The catalysts for the precipitous decline in bee colonies are unknown, and there is much debate about the cause.. Here in Virginia, hive populations have dropped by two-thirds since 1970. The potential impact on our ecosystem and food supply is devastating. Although […]

The post New Video: 3 Causes of Marketing Colony Collapse appeared first on EnergizeGrowth.

MARCOM CONTENT: How to attract new customers with an inbound content marketing program

by iMagiNation2016 @

                          If you’re new to the world of content marketing to generate in-bound leads, starting from scratch can seem a bit daunting.  But there are some tried and true methods that will get you from nothing.com to mycompany.com in no time.  Here are […]

New: Join ReferralCandy’s Affiliate Program And Get Rewarded!

by Raúl Galera @ Word-of-Mouth and Referral Marketing Blog

We have been talking about the importance of word-of-mouth marketing for years, helping thousands of ecommerce stores across many industries make over $55,000,000 USD in referral sales (and counting!) Finally, we have now decided to start our own program. If you love ReferralCandy as much as we do, here’s a good opportunity to get rewarded […]

The post New: Join ReferralCandy’s Affiliate Program And Get Rewarded! appeared first on Word-of-Mouth and Referral Marketing Blog.

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