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Doves For Sale

Weird Ringneck Dove Problem

by Sylvanas @ Pigeon-Talk

Hey guys, I recently adopted a 2 month old ringneck dove and I love her. She's really tame and has absolutely no fear of anything or anyone. I took her to a vet a few days ago for general checkups and she was in great condition. I've never owned doves before so I don't really know much about...

A Special Dove Story Update….continued

by ashe3729 @ Asheville White Dove Releases

On March 9th of 2013 a funeral service was held for Mareta Morgan at the Green Hills Cemetery in Asheville, NC where a white dove

The post A Special Dove Story Update….continued appeared first on Asheville White Dove Releases.

Doves and Christmas

by ashe3729 @ Asheville White Dove Releases

It’s not hard to notice the symbol of the dove especially at Christmas time. Doves are symbolic of peace, purity, love and the Holy Spirit,

The post Doves and Christmas appeared first on Asheville White Dove Releases.

Spread the word…and we will spread our wings!

by ashe3729 @ Asheville White Dove Releases

The post Spread the word…and we will spread our wings! appeared first on Asheville White Dove Releases.

Diamond Dove

Diamond Dove


PetSmart

null

White Elephant

White Elephant

by Jamelle Bouie @ Slate Articles

Seven months into his presidency, Donald Trump is deeply unpopular. In Gallup’s latest poll of presidential job approval, he’s down to 34 percent, a level unseen by most presidents outside of an economic disaster or foreign policy blunder. In FiveThirtyEight’s adjusted average of all approval polling, he stands at 37 percent. And yet, few Republican lawmakers of consequence are willing to buck him or his agenda, in large part because their voters still support the president by huge margins. What we have clearer evidence of now is why. From polling and the behavior of individual politicians, it’s become harder to deny that people support the president not just for being president, but for his core message of white resentment and grievance—the only area where he has been consistent and unyielding.

You see broad Republican allegiance to Trump in the polling. Nearly 70 percent of Republicans say they agree with Trump on the issues. And 78 percent of Republicans say they approve of the president’s overall job performance. Republicans who have bucked or criticized Trump, like Sen. Jeff Flake of Arizona, have jeopardized their political futures as a result.

You also see the degree to which white racial resentment is a key force among Republican voters. Most Republicans, remember, agreed with President Trump’s response to the violence in Charlottesville, Virginia, where he held both sides—white supremacists and counterdemonstrators—responsible for the chaos that claimed the life of one anti-racist protester. In an analysis of recent polling, my colleague William Saletan observes that, across a number of questions gauging racial animus, Republicans generally (and Trump supporters specifically) are most likely to give answers signaling tolerance for racism and racist ideas. Forty-one percent of Republicans, for example, say that whites face more discrimination than blacks and other nonwhite groups (among strong Trump supporters, it’s 45 percent). Ten percent of Republicans and 19 percent of strong Trump supporters have a favorable impression of white nationalists, while 13 percent of the former (and 17 percent of the latter) say it’s “acceptable” to hold white supremacist views.

And, importantly, you see these ideas expressed not just in polls but on the ground, as well. In 2014, Ed Gillespie ran for Senate as a Virginia Republican in the mold of figures like John Warner and Bob McDonnell—conservative but not a bomb-thrower. The kind of Republican politician who could make ground in Northern Virginia and other Democratic-leaning parts of the state. Gillespie tried to run that campaign in this year’s Republican primary for governor, and he might have won without trouble if not for the presence of Corey Stewart, an otherwise obscure county official who backed Donald Trump in the 2016 presidential election and challenged Gillespie as a Trump-like figure. Vocally standing in defense of the state’s Confederate monuments, Stewart ran as the candidate of white anger and racial resentment, and he almost won, losing by fewer than 5,000 votes.

Gillespie learned his lesson. In an August ad against his Democratic opponent Ralph Northam, he blasts “sanctuary cities.” In the past month, he’s hired a former Trump campaign aide—Jack Morgan, infamous for his warning that the country is on the brink of a second civil war—and has pledged to defend Confederate statues from local efforts to remove them. Donald Trump may have lost Virginia to Hillary Clinton, but Virginia Republicans are committed to the president and expect the same from their candidates.

It’s true that it’s rare for a president to lose anything more than a small minority of his partisan base. But Gillespie’s recent turn shows there is more than simple partisanship at play. There’s nothing about partisanship that forces a figure like Gillespie to go beyond simple Trump support to embracing the most inflammatory, racially reactionary parts of his appeal. In theory, it should be possible to maintain allegiance to Trump without pantomiming the resentment that fuels his presidency.

But this isn’t true in practice. Signaling allegiance to Trump requires embracing white identity politics, because those beliefs reflect the views of many Republican voters.

White identity politics have always been dominant in American life, one of the key forces that shape much of the nation’s political and social landscape. It’s not that Trump is new; it’s that he’s explicit, and in making his open appeal to white identity and its supposed endangerment, he has raised its salience. Before Trump, white resentment was part of Republican politics. In the age of Trump, it increasingly defines it.

In loving memory of my father, Richard Gaunt Oct. 16th, 1924-August 10, 2013

by ashe3729 @ Asheville White Dove Releases

My father was one of my greatest supporters and cheer leaders in my life.  He seemed to maintain a true appreciation for life and for

The post In loving memory of my father, Richard Gaunt Oct. 16th, 1924-August 10, 2013 appeared first on Asheville White Dove Releases.

Baby Boomers are doing things differently…

by ashe3729 @ Asheville White Dove Releases

Times are changing and so are the ways we celebrate life! Here are a few unique ways that some folks have honored their loved ones.

The post Baby Boomers are doing things differently… appeared first on Asheville White Dove Releases.

Why this Alabama woman has a loft full of 100 doves

Why this Alabama woman has a loft full of 100 doves


AL.com

"Doves represent peace, love and tranquility," said Paula Murphy of Elberta.

It’s Time to Talk to North Korea

It’s Time to Talk to North Korea

by Fred Kaplan @ Slate Articles

The complaint about the U.N. Security Council’s new sanctions against North Korea is that they aren’t strict enough to force Kim Jong-un to dismantle his nuclear program. But here’s the thing: Nothing is going to force him to do that.

It’s time to recognize that North Korea is a nuclear power—small and not fully tested but a nuclear power nonetheless—and that, as with other nuclear powers, the most effective ways to deal with it are through deterrence and diplomacy. Any other course is the stuff of delusions.

There are several reasons why Kim would be loath to give up his nukes. First, they are all he has. For a tiny, impoverished country amid several large, rich ones (“a shrimp among whales,” as Kim Il-sung, the country’s founder and Kim Jong-un’s grandfather, put it), nukes can stave off a wide range of threats.

Second, Kim follows the news. He saw what happened to Saddam Hussein and Muammar Qaddafi when they gave up their nuclear programs, whether through force or conciliation: They were invaded or overthrown anyway. Kim is no doubt also aware of what’s happening with the Iranian nuclear deal: The Iranians agreed to dismantle the country’s nuclear program, in exchange for lifting sanctions; the International Atomic Energy Agency has verified that they’re abiding by the deal’s terms, yet President Donald Trump says that he might claim they’re not and reimpose the sanctions anyway. Given all this recent history, no one in Kim’s position would outright surrender his one source of leverage and power.

Finally, economic sanctions have their limits, especially with a dictator who has little concern for the health or wealth of his citizens. Kim, his entourage, and certain party officials enjoy luxuries, while most of his country’s 25 million people live in abject poverty. Two million are believed to have died in a famine in the 1990s. The Kim dynasty did not suffer.

The sanctions levied by the U.N. Security Council on Monday are far-reaching. They ban textile exports from North Korea and the sale of natural gas to North Korea; set a cap on refined petroleum imports, to the point of cutting the country’s current consumption by about 10 percent; and allow inspections of ships suspected of carrying fuel or weapons into North Korean harbors.

These measures fall short of what the Trump administration had pushed for: a ban on refined petroleum imports, the right to board suspected ships with arms, and a freezing of Kim’s personal assets. But Trump’s tougher sanctions were never going to pass, and since the United States conducts no trade with North Korea, we need the approval of those who do conduct trade, especially China. The dilemma here is that China wants to punish North Korea for its atomic antics but not so much that the regime might collapse. If it did collapse, China would face a humanitarian crisis in its scantly populated northeast territories, as millions of North Koreans would stream across the border. A collapse would also mean U.S. air and naval forces would no longer be holed up in northeast Asia and could thus redeploy to the South China Sea and Taiwan Strait, which are China’s most vital areas.

Conceivably, Kim might do or say something so reckless that Chinese leaders recalculate their strategic priorities. But according to U.S. military and intelligence officials who follow China closely, there’s no evidence that any such shift is in the offing.

In other words, given the geostrategic context, sanctions are always going to be halfhearted at best.

The Washington Post’s David Ignatius reported recently that Secretary of State Rex Tillerson has been holding quiet discussions with his counterparts in China and Russia about resuming some sort of talks with North Korea about its nuclear program. German Chancellor Angela Merkel has said that, if these talks do get underway, she wants a seat at the table too.

This makes sense. If North Korea is now a nuclear power, having tested high-yield bombs and missiles with the range to strike our Asian allies and possibly slices of the continental United States, then we need to talk, even if talking doesn’t yield much.

In a fascinating article for the New Yorker, Evan Osnos described a recent trip to Pyongyang, where, among other things, he talked at length with senior officials of the North Korean Foreign Ministry’s Institute for American Studies. What struck me most was how little even these officials understand about American politics, culture, and attitudes. And, of course, this ignorance and misapprehension is reciprocated in the Trump administration, which, besides other shortcomings, has not yet nominated an assistant secretary of state or defense for East Asian and Pacific affairs.

The United States could deploy an impressive array of military forces designed to persuade Kim not to attack us or our allies. In other words, we can mount an effective deterrent. The South Korean government, which otherwise advocates peaceful détente between the two countries, announced on Sept. 4 that it was creating a “decapitation unit”—a special brigade whose sole mission is to kill Kim in the event of war.* The Seoul officials announced this publicly because the very knowledge of this brigade could have a deterrent effect on Kim’s actions.

But wars sometimes erupt through accidents and misunderstandings, and one way to ward off that possibility is diplomacy. Trump and Kim are never going to be friends (and if Trump thinks they might be, he should forget about it at once), but talks have their value—if just to explore what the various sides in the talks want.

Also, even if we can’t force or persuade the North Koreans to get rid of their nuclear arsenal, maybe we can push them to freeze or otherwise limit its size. They are said to have about 20 nuclear weapons (or the making of 20 weapons). Better 20 than 100 or 200, which wouldn’t be impossible if they keep churning them out unabated.

China has suggested North Korea might freeze its nuclear program in exchange for a suspension of U.S.–South Korean military exercises.* This is a bad idea: What the U.S. needs to do, now that North Korea has nuclear weapons, is to shore up its cooperation—military and otherwise—with its allies in the region, especially with South Korea, which the North has long wanted to weaken.

But maybe there are other lures for which the North would agree to freeze its program. There’s no way to find out but to find out. The guaranteed way not to find out—or to accomplish anything that might keep Pyongyang in check—is to pretend that nothing has changed. There’s no magic chokehold to make Kim Jong-un scream “Uncle!” and succumb to all our wishes.

Correction, Sept. 13, 2017: This post originally stated that the South Korean government announced the creation of the “decapitation unit” on Sept. 12. It announced the unit on Sept. 4. It also misstated that North Korea said it would freeze its nuclear program in exchange for a suspension of U.S.–South Korean military exercises. Chinese officials suggested North Korea might do so.

White Dove Release in Western Pennsylvania

White Dove Release in Western Pennsylvania


White Dove Release in Western Pennsylvania

Doves of Love - White Dove Release in Western Pennsylvania. Allegheny, Beaver, Butler County, for weddings, anniversaries, funerals, parties and celebrations.

4 Ringneck doves for sale - NC

4 Ringneck doves for sale - NC


BackYard Chickens

I have 3 young doves and one adult hen for sale. The doves are $10 each, let me know your zip code in advanced and I will get an exact shipping cost...

May 30th, Memorial Day…a remembrance

by ashe3729 @ Asheville White Dove Releases

Another year has passed and we are steadily approaching summer with Spring in full blossom. This time of year we are also anticipating a welcomed

The post May 30th, Memorial Day…a remembrance appeared first on Asheville White Dove Releases.

Groce Funeral Home, Asheville, NC, leader in green burial

by ashe3729 @ Asheville White Dove Releases

As the times change so do our needs for caring for the deceased.         Some local funeral homes like Groce Funeral Home,

The post Groce Funeral Home, Asheville, NC, leader in green burial appeared first on Asheville White Dove Releases.

WHITE DOVES FOR SALE for Weddings | Davao Weddings

WHITE DOVES FOR SALE for Weddings | Davao Weddings


Davao Weddings

WHITE DOVES FOR SALE for Weddings, Fiesta and any occasions! PROMO PRICE: Php700 per pair (FREE Delivery Charge within Davao City, Panabo and Tagum areas

The Angle: New Phone, Who Dis? Edition

The Angle: New Phone, Who Dis? Edition

by Rebecca Onion @ Slate Articles

The next big thing: Apple introduced the new iPhones in a presentation complete with demonstrations of creepy animojis and tone-deaf vows to further monopolize our vanishing public sphere. April Glaser runs down what you'll get in the new models and explains why you'll convince yourself it's OK to pay $1,000 for the highest-end version.

One-man guy: Steve Bannon's Sunday-night 60 Minutes interview showed that the former presidential adviser saw blind loyalty to Trump as a sine qua non of serving him. Will Saletan explains that this is one of many of Bannon's fascist tendencies.

Blame game: Right-wing media is gloating over Evergreen State's drop in enrollment, attributing it to the "Mizzou Effect"—the supposed influence of student activism on a school's fortunes. Dan Engber explains that the connection may not be quite so easy to make.

Default futurist: Margaret Atwood doesn't really believe in predictions. Ed Finn interviews an author whose work has become life.

For fun: How Ted Cruz's account might've liked That Tweet.

I vote for the Lonely Senator,

Rebecca

One People, One Bird, One Wish…

by ashe3729 @ Asheville White Dove Releases

For thousands of years, white doves have been a traditional symbol in wedding ceremonies. To the ancient Egyptians, the dove represented quiet innocence. The Chinese saw

The post One People, One Bird, One Wish… appeared first on Asheville White Dove Releases.

White Dove Release Asheville, NC- Weddings, Memorials

White Dove Release Asheville, NC- Weddings, Memorials


Asheville White Dove Releases

Releasing white doves offers a unique and special experience for weddings, funerals and events. White doves are a highlight in all milestone events.

Dove Canyon Real Estate - Dove Canyon CA Homes For Sale  | Zillow

Dove Canyon Real Estate - Dove Canyon CA Homes For Sale | Zillow


Zillow

Zillow has 6 homes for sale in Dove Canyon CA. View listing photos, review sales history, and use our detailed real estate filters to find the perfect place.

Free local classified ads

Free local classified ads


Gumtree

Find doves for sale ads in our Birds category. Buy and sell almost anything on Gumtree classifieds.

See Doves of Destiny on WeddingWire

See Doves of Destiny on WeddingWire


WeddingWire

Are you looking for a unique way to set your wedding or special event apart from the rest? Add a white dove release! They are the perfect symbol of love and purity. - Symbolize the uniting of two families at your wedding. - Release doves during your...

Doves ads in Birds And Aviaries For Sale in Johannesburg | Junk Mail Classifieds

Doves ads in Birds And Aviaries For Sale in Johannesburg | Junk Mail Classifieds


Junk Mail Classifieds

View our Doves adverts in Birds And Aviaries For Sale in Johannesburg at Junk Mail Classifieds

Robert Mueller, Meet Mark Zuckerberg

Robert Mueller, Meet Mark Zuckerberg

by Jennifer Taub @ Slate Articles

Folks at Facebook need to lean in and lawyer up. Special counsel Robert Mueller’s legal dream team is likely exploring whether the tech company has liability for political ads sold to a Russian firm. It’s time for Facebook to share what it knows.

We learned last week that a Russian company paid Facebook $100,000 to place political ads. The Washington Post reported that this firm also disseminated pro-Kremlin propaganda, while the Daily Beast wrote that the ads may have reached as many as 70 million Americans. Some were circulated before the election and mentioned candidates Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump by name. The purchase of these political ads by the Russian company could be a federal crime, and members of the Trump campaign and Facebook could be implicated.

The candidate ads look like independent expenditures by a foreign national in a U.S. election in violation of the Federal Election Campaign Act. Under FECA, the term “foreign national” includes corporations organized under the laws of a foreign county or with a principal place of business in a foreign country. If done knowingly and willfully, such spending by a foreign national is a crime.

But what about the First Amendment? That should not be a concern in this case. In 2012, after Citizens United v. FEC, the Supreme Court confirmed in Bluman v. FEC that barring foreign nationals from spending in our elections does not violate the First Amendment.

The Department of Justice has successfully prosecuted FECA cases. In 2014, conservative writer Dinesh D’Souza pleaded guilty to charges that he violated FECA by making campaign contributions to a Senate campaign using straw donors. And in 2015, a political consultant was convicted for illegal campaign coordination in violation of FECA and sentenced to 24 months in prison.

Assuming the Russian company is criminally liable for purchasing political ads, what does this have to do with the Trump campaign and Facebook? Let’s focus on the Trump campaign first.

On June 9, 2016, Paul Manafort, Donald Trump Jr., and Jared Kushner met in Trump Tower with, among others, a Kremlin-linked lawyer and a Russian American with an alleged expertise in cyberattacks. Trump Jr. expected to obtain opposition research on Hillary Clinton—as go-between Rob Goldstone told him via email, “This is very high level and sensitive information but is part of Russia and its government's support for Mr. Trump.” Trump Jr. gushed in response, “If it’s what you say I love it.”

That meeting might be part of a criminal conspiracy to violate federal election law. FECA broadly prohibits foreign nationals from contributing any “thing of value” in connection with a federal, state, or local election. Campaign staff also cannot solicit, accept, or receive any “thing of value.” The “high-level” information at issue in the Trump Tower meeting, especially as it was offered in the context of a discussion about the easing of sanctions on Russia, is arguably a “thing of value.”

This we have heard. Now, let’s toss in the Facebook ads.

Let’s say a conspiracy in the form of an agreement to violate FECA was established before or during that Trump Tower meeting. And let’s assume that after the meeting, someone involved in that conspiracy helped make the Facebook ad purchases. Assume that the distribution of political ads was either one of the original goals of the conspiracy or foreseeable. Then paying for (or aiding and abetting or causing) those ads is likely a federal crime. Therefore, all members of the conspiracy (including Trump Jr., Kushner, and Manafort) may be criminally responsible. Importantly, such crimes could be attributable to members who knew nothing about buying the ads. That’s how conspiracy works.

There are still many blank spaces. Did anyone in the campaign help decide which ads to run and where to target them geographically? Even if there was no conspiracy at Trump Tower, this assistance could also be a felony.

So, what about Facebook?

Generally speaking, political ads on Facebook should have disclaimers indicating who paid for them. It’s not likely that the lack of disclaimers in and of itself will give rise to a criminal offense. But it’s important nevertheless because given that legal requirement, employees of Facebook who sold the ads either knew or should have known that a foreign national paid for them.

In 2006, the Federal Election Commission issued a rule stating that “communications placed for a fee on another person's website” are “public communications” subject to disclaimer requirements. In 2011, Facebook requested an advisory opinion from the FEC, arguing that including disclaimers from political committees on ads that qualified as “small items” was “impracticable.”

Because an affirmative vote of four members is required, and only three of the six agreed with Facebook’s assessment, the FEC concluded without issuing an opinion on the matter. As FEC Commissioner Ellen Weintraub explained, “The fact that three commissioners may have announced that they may not be prepared to enforce the law does not negate the law that’s on the books.”

So, back to the potential crime scene. Facebook could be criminally liable for violating FECA. This would be the case if it was found to have knowingly and willfully aided, abetted, counseled, commanded, induced or procured, or willfully caused the purchase by the Russian company of political ads.

Facebook has recently claimed that no one on its sales team communicated with individuals who purchased the political ads. This may not absolve the firm of responsibility as conscious avoidance can be a theory for establishing liability. Ultimately, it will be up to Robert Mueller to answer these murky questions. In the meantime, it would be wise for Facebook to tell the special counsel everything it knows about how the ad purchases were made and who made them.

Trash Dove: Gifts & Merchandise | Redbubble

Trash Dove: Gifts & Merchandise | Redbubble


Redbubble

High quality Trash Dove inspired T-Shirts, Posters, Mugs and more by independent artists and des...

Doves | Birds for Sale - Gumtree

Doves | Birds for Sale - Gumtree


Gumtree.com

Find a doves on Gumtree, the #1 site for Birds for Sale classifieds ads in the UK.

Doves for Sale

Doves for Sale


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Bird and Parrot classifieds. Browse through available doves for sale by aviaries, breeders and bird rescues.

White Dove

White Dove


Animal World

Pet care information about White Dove

Weird Ringneck Dove Problem

by Sylvanas @ Pigeon-Talk

Hey guys, I recently adopted a 2 month old ringneck dove and I love her. She's really tame and has absolutely no fear of anything or anyone. I took her to a vet a few days ago for general checkups and she was in great condition. I've never owned doves before so I don't really know much about...

Trump Is Playing Two-Dimensional Chess

Trump Is Playing Two-Dimensional Chess

by Reihan Salam @ Slate Articles

Donald Trump is feeling desperate. The president is at long last reckoning with the fact that he is profoundly unpopular, which has proven a tough pill to swallow for a man with a yearning desire to win the approval of the hosts of various cable news programs. To the dismay of immigration hardliners, he seems to have concluded that the surest way to resuscitate his presidency is to broker a deal with congressional Democrats on protecting the Dreamers, or some smaller or larger subset of unauthorized immigrants. As is typical of Trump, he is walking into an obvious trap. A short while from now—my guess is that it’ll be about a week—he will need to make another move to keep everyone in America from hating him. The good news is that I know exactly what he has to do.

To make an obvious point, there is a big difference between Trump putting forward a narrowly tailored solution for those who are currently eligible for DACA versus throwing his support behind a more expansive measure, like the latest iteration of the DREAM Act, sponsored by Sens. Richard Durbin and Lindsey Graham. I can promise that if the president backs a more narrowly tailored solution, his intimations that it would be horribly cruel not to protect young Dreamers from deportation will be thrown back in his face. Yet if Trump makes too many concessions, he risks antagonizing some of his core supporters.

Trump has said he wants protections for the Dreamers to be part of a package deal that will include increased spending on immigration enforcement, but not spending for his long-promised border wall. Fair enough. This is a deal at least some restrictionists might find acceptable, provided the immigration enforcement measures are meaningful. Scholars at the restrictionist Center for Immigration Studies often emphasize the importance of tightening workplace enforcement, to help ensure that firms are not hiring unauthorized immigrant workers. Is there any prospect that congressional Democrats would accept such concessions? My guess is that although they might accept token spending increases, they’d balk at a serious workplace enforcement effort. So too would Republican lawmakers solicitous of the interests of unscrupulous low-wage employers.

You might think Trump could just walk if he doesn’t get a good enough deal. The president, though, has staked his reputation on his supposed dealmaking prowess. If he fails to secure a deal, and if Morning Joe loses patience with him, he is liable to bug out.

At this point, I find it highly unlikely Trump will be able to cut a deal that will satisfy immigration hawks. It’s possible he’s concluded that they’ll stick with him regardless of how much he betrays them, out of tribal loyalty if nothing else. The trouble is that opinion on immigration is asymmetrical. As a general rule, immigration hawks care more about the issue than immigration doves. Even if the president shifts hard to the left on immigration, it’s unlikely immigration doves will suddenly decide the man who accused Mexican-born immigrants of being murderers and rapists is in fact a chill dude. It’s Trump’s hateful language about immigration from the campaign that they’ll remember, not that he caved on the issue as president. Immigration hawks, meanwhile, will be hopping mad if the president sells them out. Although they’re unlikely to abandon him completely—they’ll still prefer Trump over Elizabeth Warren or Kamala Harris, who will no doubt take far more dovish positions on immigration—they’ll be less inclined to forgive future transgressions.

That brings me to Trump’s next move. Right now, Republican lawmakers are wrangling over all manner of tax policy questions: how low the corporate tax rate should go, whether pass-throughs should get even more favorable treatment than they do under the current tax code, how exactly to rejigger the marginal tax rate schedule, and more. One flank of the GOP wants 1986-style revenue-neutral tax reform, which will inevitably mean angering tons of people who will lose out as their deductions and credits are trimmed, consolidated, or eliminated outright. Another favors a George W. Bush–style temporary tax cut, which will involve a lot less pain, but that will also be less likely to spur the kind of long-term behavioral changes on the part of investors and employers that could boost long-run economic growth. On substantive grounds, reform is the better way to go. But passing a serious tax reform measure is also next to impossible, not least because the Trump White House is utterly incapable of knocking heads together to make it happen.

Trump’s path of least resistance, then, will be to champion a temporary tax cut aimed at the ultrawealthy, which will jibe with the sensibilities of his top economic advisers. But if he really wants to be loved, and to change the perception of his presidency for the better, he should instead back a progressive payroll tax cut aimed at low- and middle-income earners and an increase in the earned-income tax credit for childless workers. He should also push for a massive expansion of the child credit, one that would make it refundable against payroll taxes, which are far more burdensome than income taxes for most working- and middle-class parents, as Ramesh Ponnuru of National Review has noted. And as an added bonus, Ivanka Trump has emerged as the No. 1 champion of the idea inside the White House.

Taken together, these seemingly small tax tweaks would undoubtedly cause the deficit to increase. While it’s not hard to imagine how these tax cuts could be offset by well-targeted hikes elsewhere, let’s be serious: Trump isn’t going to want to raise taxes. What he cares about most is goosing his approval ratings, and this delectable little prix fixe of budget-busting tax cuts should do wonders in that department.

Trump Can’t Score a Win

Trump Can’t Score a Win

by Jamelle Bouie @ Slate Articles

Donald Trump was destined to have a difficult first year as president. He wasn’t just a minority president, selected by quirk of the electoral process; he was a political novice with no experience of public office and a uniquely divisive figure, who stoked white racial resentment to fuel his ascendancy. And while he had the advantage of a Republican Congress (with a decisive majority in the House of Representatives), he was ill-equipped to use it, entering office with few plans or proposals outside of executive actions.

But every president has challenges to overcome. Trump’s promise was that he could bring his business acumen to bear on America’s problems, substituting raw deal-making talent for knowledge and experience.

Far from accomplishment, however, what we’ve seen from Trump and Congress is failure and dysfunction. For comparison’s sake, at this point in his presidency, Barack Obama had signed a major stimulus package and was barreling ahead on health care reform. George W. Bush had signed his first round of tax cuts and was shepherding education reform through Congress. And Bill Clinton had worked successfully with Congress to raise taxes on the wealthiest Americans and expand the Earned Income Tax Credit.

President Trump, by contrast, has nothing. Obamacare repeal is a bust, his infrastructure plan doesn’t actually exist, and his push for comprehensive “tax reform”—meaning a series of upper-income tax cuts—has yet to translate to an actual plan or proposal. That might be manageable if it were the only item on the agenda, giving Trump and Congress time to work on a package acceptable to all sides within the Republican Party. As it stands, the president’s tax ambitions are competing with three contentious and must-pass efforts: relief for Hurricane Harvey, a bill to fund the government through the end of the year, and a bill to lift the debt ceiling and allow the government to pay its obligations. Trump has issued little guidance for Republican lawmakers on these issues, deferring to Congress—and as we saw with health care—opening the door to confusion and infighting. He is an ignorant president, unaware of his ignorance and unable to address it. And so he refuses to put in the time to understand an issue and do the hard work of hashing out solutions with his policy aides, or sitting down with Paul Ryan and Mitch McConnell to hammer out a strategy.

Further weighing down his legislative priorities are Trump’s own scandals and controversies. The FBI’s Russia investigation continues to loom in the background of his presidency. His statements in Charlottesville—first blaming “many sides” for the violence that shook the small Virginia city and then defending the white supremacists who provoked it—harmed his job approval rating, and prompted real criticism from fellow Republicans. His most recent action fits this mold. In a distinctly unpopular move, Trump plans to end the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, making hundreds of thousands of unauthorized immigrants—all brought to the United States as children—vulnerable to deportation on account of their legal status, or lack thereof. This too has brought condemnation from within his party. “President Trump’s decision to eliminate DACA is the wrong approach to immigration policy at a time when both sides of the aisle need to come together to reform our broken immigration system and secure the border,” said Arizona Sen. John McCain in a statement.

A tense legislative fight over these immigrants—sometimes called “Dreamers” on account of the stillborn DREAM Act, which would grant them a path to permanent legal residency—could split congressional Republicans and further shrink the space for Trump’s agenda on taxes and the border wall. It’s not just that a handful of Republicans, like McCain, support a solution for these unauthorized immigrants; it’s that the White House is being antagonistic toward Congress in a way that could hurt its own priorities. “If Congress doesn’t want to do the job they were elected to do, maybe they should get out of the way and let someone else do it,” said Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders at Tuesday’s press briefing. (Although, if Democrats and Republicans managed to pass a permanent solution for Dreamers—which, barring some trade, would represent a deep compromise—it would ironically give Trump the legislative win he needs.)

Despite the likelihood that they will scramble his legislative efforts for the rest of the year, Trump’s actions on DACA do get to a fact of his presidency. For as much as he lacks legislative accomplishments—thus harming the Republican Party and its ideological priorities—he has hardly been stymied at every turn. At present, he is using the executive branch to reward corporate allies and further feed the racial resentment that powered his presidential bid. His Department of Education and Environmental Protection Agency, for instance, have been turned wholesale over to industry interests, with political appointees using their influence to reward for-profit colleges and fossil fuel producers. And in addition to his actions against Hispanic immigrants and Muslim Americans, Trump has used the power of the White House and the Justice Department to attack affirmative action and defend the worst abuses of American law enforcement, going as far as to pardon a serial violator of the constitutional rights of prisoners.

Donald Trump has been a strikingly ineffective president vis à vis Congress, and with just more than 60 days left in the legislative calendar, there’s a strong chance the self-proclaimed dealmaker will finish the year with no substantive policy deals made. But his failures to be productive don’t preclude him from being destructive. And as we’ve just witnessed with DACA, Trump will not hesitate to take that path.

Cherub Garden Statue with Doves ON SALE at Wing and a Prayer!

Cherub Garden Statue with Doves ON SALE at Wing and a Prayer!


Wing and A Prayer Angelic Creations, Inc. Lake Zurich, IL USA, All rights reserved.

This original Wing and a Prayer cheerful Cherub Garden Statue with Doves is lost in thought! Angel Lover? We have great selection for you to choose from!

Remembering those who serve….

by ashe3729 @ Asheville White Dove Releases

  This Memorial Day, there will many ceremonies to honor those who have served in the armed forces. One such ceremony is just outside Asheville,

The post Remembering those who serve…. appeared first on Asheville White Dove Releases.

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The Secret History of America’s Oldest Tofu Shop

The Secret History of America’s Oldest Tofu Shop

by Heather Arndt Anderson @ Slate Articles

Each week, Roads & Kingdoms and Slate publish a new dispatch from around the globe. For more foreign correspondence mixed with food, war, travel, and photography, visit its online magazine or follow @roadskingdoms on Twitter.

In the prehistoric days before everyone got all orthorexic, soy and gluten were staple proteins for vegetarians. During my own decadelong foray into vegetarianism, I was thankful for the wide variety of meat analogues, a good century in the making (thanks, Seventh-day Adventists!), but my biggest revelation was learning to cook with tofu. It could be mashed into pancake batter, scrambled with vegetables and twisted into tortillas, and of course, tossed into a stir fry.

Back then, I knew that my town, Portland, Oregon, was the birthplace of the Gardenburger, but I had no idea that I’d also grown up in the same city as the longest-standing tofu shop in the United States. I hadn’t realized that local hippie ready-to-eat food companies like Higher Taste and King Harvest had been using this venerable tofu in their respective Golden Slice sandwich and Grinning “Chicken” Tofu Curry (the now-defunct pita pocket satisfyingly overflowed with savory cubes of curried tofu, topped with shredded carrots and a solitary black olive).

For Ota Tofu Company, the process of making tofu hasn’t changed significantly in more than a century. The beans are rinsed and ground to pulp before cooking and flushing the soy milk from the slurry through a cloth bag. Today, the nigari salt is purchased from a supply company instead of made from evaporated seawater, but it still turns creamy soy milk into chubby curds. Instead of cobblestones set upon planks, stainless steel hydraulics gently press the water from the tofu; the process still converts the loose coagulum into cottony, semi-solid bricks, and these delicate bricks are still carefully cut and packaged by hand.

* * *

Standing at about 5-foot-2, Eileen Ota is strictly business, wearing an apron and white rubber boots, a kerchief to hold back her bobbed, salt-speckled hair, and wire-framed glasses perched on her nose. The phone rings off the hook. A Vietnamese restaurateur comes in, wheels his hand truck past me, and another worker loads it with buckets of tofu. I try to stay out of the way.

Ota hands me a paper hairnet and tells me that I need to ask permission before photographing anyone. I put it on and with my nicest manners, head into the tofu shop’s work space.

Back in the tiny, fluorescent-lit factory, the women massaging the curds into the cheesecloth-lined boxes are shyly smiling and ducking my camera, but reluctantly allow me to include their gloved hands in a few shots. Ota’s elderly husband, Ko, allows me to snap a few from behind his station at the soybean cooker.

I’m taken with the efficiency of the small operation. Everyone has a job to do, and they do it well. After more than a century, the kinks have been ironed out. The machines in the factory can crank out 500 pounds of tofu an hour, but much of the work still requires the touch of human hands.

* * *

Between 1890 and 1910, Portland’s Japanese population grew from just 20 to nearly 1,500 people. In addition to Nihonmachi (Japantown) just north of the city’s urban center, a second, suburban community emerged in the Montavilla area of East Portland. At first they were mostly men, settling in the fertile foothills of Mount Tabor to farm berries and vegetables. Later women began to arrive to the city, taking out ads in the local paper seeking domestic work in private family residences. In 1905, the local YWCA began offering Saturday evening cooking classes to Japanese women, giving inexperienced nikkei a leg up in American cookery.

With a more gender-balanced population in the mid-aughts, people married and started families, and Nihonmachi went from a seedy district of drifting laborers (and the caterers to men’s vice) to a blossoming neighborhood. Sukiyaki hot pot restaurants (a Japanese analogue to the then-trendy chow mein parlors run by Chinese cooks), bath houses, grocery stores, and a fish market opened in service to the growing Japanese community, and Saizo Ohta (the original Anglicized spelling of the family’s name) arrived from Okayama with his two older brothers.

Much mystery surrounds the origins of the company. One of the elder Ohta brothers opened the tofu shop in partnership with a Mr. Nagaro in 1911, whose given name and place of origin are unknown. It’s not even clear if the Ohtas had been tofu-makers back in Okayama, or if they’d merely seized an opportunity to fill a need in their new city. The brother (whose first name is also not known) then returned to Japan, leaving his half of the business to Saizo. Originally called Asahi Tofu, the tofu-ten, as a tofu shop is known in Japan, was first located on NW Third and Davis, sharing an address with a Japanese laundry. When Saizo and his wife, Shina, took over the business, they moved it around the corner to a new location, and the name of the business was changed from Asahi (meaning “morning sun”) to the family name. No one knows what happened to mysterious Mr. Nagaro.

While Sukiyaki was slowly gaining popularity throughout the U.S., Japanese cuisine was still largely misunderstood and unappreciated. Portland directories in the 1920s and ’30s listed the tofu shop as a bakery, the “soy bean cakes” evidently having been confused for pastry by the directory’s publishers. However, one gushing restaurant review published in the Oregonian in 1932 got it right, noting that the Tokio Sukiyaki House, located a block away from the Ohtas’ shop, included ingredients such as bamboo shoots and celery sprouts imported from faraway lands, “while the soy bean cake is made locally.”

Although their Chinese neighbors had always formed a good portion of the Ohtas’ customer base, the Japanese invasion of Manchuria in 1931 brought growing tensions between the Chinese and Japanese communities to a head. Japanese business owners tried to keep their heads down, but Chinese customers stopped coming in. From their tiny shop, the Ohtas carried on, making silky tofu, puffy and golden-fried aburaage, and gelatinous, bruise-hued blocks of voodoo lily paste called konnyaku. Then, Pearl Harbor changed everything.

* * *

Anti-Asian racism wasn’t new, but Pearl Harbor changed everything. In 1942, President Franklin D. Roosevelt issued Executive Order 9066, allowing people with Japanese, German, or Italian ancestry to be incarcerated in concentration camps. Those with Japanese ancestry—nearly 70,000 American citizens—were forcibly evacuated to the assembly center (located at a decommissioned cattle stockyard) for detention before being shipped off to an Idaho concentration camp called the Minidoka Relocation Center. With only 48 hours’ notice in some cases, Japanese businesses were liquidated and property sold off for whatever amount they could get. Whatever property hadn’t been sold was confiscated. Nihonmachi slowly converted to Portland’s second Chinatown as Chinese residents and business owners took advantage of the newly vacated properties, but there were no longer any tofu-makers in town.

Life in Minidoka was demoralizing, with families forced into barracks within barbed wire enclosures, living in cubicles divided by a thin sheet. They were fed Army rations that attempted to erase their Japanese identities, supplemented with hot dogs and Spam. If they were cooperative and proved their loyalty, adults and teens might earn the privilege of working in potato and sugar beet fields to break up the monotony of their daily lives. Nonetheless, people carried on, trying to make the most of things by writing newspapers, creating schools for their children, and growing gardens.

* * *

On Jan. 2, 1945, the War Department declared that the Japanese at last were free to leave the camps, but about a third of Japanese-American Oregonians never returned to their former hometowns. Of those that did return to the state, most tried to return to farming but were met with racist resentment.

Saizo Ohta died at Minidoka in 1943, leaving Shina to take over the shop and run it herself after the war ended. Mercifully, the building’s landlord had been sympathetic during the war and had saved the tofu equipment and the shop space (where the Ohtas also lived), and Shina reopened the shop as Soybean Cake Company. Though Japantown had been transformed into New Chinatown, there was still a customer base in the neighborhood who bought tofu.

Saizo and Shina’s daughter, Matsuno, had been in Japan receiving her education for several years when the war broke out, and she stayed put until well after the war ended. She returned to Portland in 1955 with her husband and their three children (during which time the spelling of their name was updated to Ota). Two years later, Shina suffered a stroke, leaving the care of the shop to her son-in-law and her grandson, Koichi (usually called Ko).

Over time, things began to settle back down somewhat for Portland’s nikkei. Japanese grocery stores like Anzen reopened soon after the war, and restaurants like Bush Garden slowly resurfaced. By 1970, a community cookbook produced by the ladies of my great-aunt Ruby’s (mostly white) church included a few recipes provided by Harriet Uchiyama, a Chinese American whose Japanese husband had spent a chunk of his childhood at Minidoka. Her recipe for “roast chicken,” while benignly named, is teriyaki in disguise, flavored with hoisin and soy sauce (a marriage of Chinese and Japanese flavors), brown sugar, honey, and garlic. Japanese food was finally coming out of hiding.

* * *

In the 1970s, anti-Japanese sentiments faded as Americans became enrapt with health foods. Like granola and sprouts, tofu was on trend. Now it wasn’t just Japanese restaurants and markets that bought the Otas’ wares. Health food stores, hippie co-ops, and vegetarian-friendly cafés (like King Harvest) were popping up all over town. Even mainstream stores like Safeway began carrying tofu on their shelves.

It was about this time that Ko, then owner-operator of the shop, married Eileen (a Japanese American Portland native), and a few years later they moved the shop across the river to their current location on SE Eighth and Stark, with a few modernizations in place. Though he has slowed down somewhat, Ko still works the soybean grinder and cooker.

Over the past few years, a couple of Vietnamese tofu shops have opened in Portland, selling firmer tofu with different flavors. In Japan, the method of making nigari-style tofu like Ota’s has largely fallen out of fashion, mostly relegated to mom-and-pop tofu-ten in neighborhoods and Japan’s countryside, but its flavor is considered the finest, with a subtle sweetness coming through. Tofu this good can be eaten plain, or drizzled simply with soy sauce and a sprinkle of sliced scallions.

Though she is a font of patience and kindness, Eileen and I lamented the youthful rejection of labor-intensive traditional foods. Younger generations prefer convenience, and are less interested in outdated techniques, both in America and Japan. It’s the older immigrants who’ve been settled here for decades that prefer traditional ways and foods, whereas today’s immigrants bring their modernity with them.

As Ota’s new Korean, Chinese, and Vietnamese customers acclimate to American foodways, they tend to come in less frequently. But for immigrants, language and food are like time capsules; by maintaining traditional recipes and techniques as the city rapidly changes around them, Ota Tofu honors this. For white Portland natives like me, Ota keeps me linked to my city’s history.

Anzen was Ota Tofu’s longest-standing customer until it closed in 2014 (after 109 years in business). Today, a distributor in eastern Washington is the shop’s longest-standing account—around since Ko’s parents’ day—thanks to Andy’s Market in College Place, catering to the students at Seventh-day Adventist–affiliated Walla Walla University. Most of Ota’s business comes from wholesale accounts held by local restaurants and stores, but it still graciously sells its tofu to people like me, regular folks who wander in off the street with a few bucks in their pocket. If you bring a bucket, the pressed-out soybean meal called okara is free (it’s great mixed with ground pork and fried into patties or meatballs, to eat with ramen). Ota Tofu Company does this as a service to the community. Anyone who has tasted tofu made only hours ago knows what a service this is.

Doves, Finches, Softbills

Doves, Finches, Softbills


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Doves…Why do we regard them as symbols of peace?

by ashe3729 @ Asheville White Dove Releases

Doves mate for life, are incredibly loyal to each other and work together to build their nest and raise their young. This fact makes them an excellent

The post Doves…Why do we regard them as symbols of peace? appeared first on Asheville White Dove Releases.

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